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This is really annoying. I'm using the label as part of a list item user control, where the user can click it to select the list item and double-click it to rename it. However, if you had a name in the clipboard, double-clicking the label will replace it with the text of the label!

I've also check the other labels in the application, and they will also copy to the clipboard on a doubleclick. I have not written any clipboard code in this program, and I am using the standard .NET labels.

Is there any way to disable this functionality?

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2  
Just a guess -- have you tried handling the MouseDoubleClick event and doing nothing? –  Austin Salonen Mar 25 '10 at 21:45
    
I can reproduce this on my Vista machine, but not on two my XP machines. –  eschneider Mar 25 '10 at 22:08
2  
Austin - that doesn't work, unfortunately. The text is copied to the clipboard before the event is fired. –  Richard Watson Dec 28 '10 at 21:26
    
I'm using the DevExpress label control and it does not seem to have this behaviour. I was unaware that the original label had that functionality. –  Pierre-Alain Vigeant Dec 28 '10 at 21:46
3  
This was a "feature" introduced by a Windows Shell programmer during the Windows Vista timeframe. He checked in the change with no explanation. The .NET Framework team didn't notice until it was pointed out to them in the Win7 timeframe, and by the time they learned of it, they were scared of changing the framework to disable the unwanted behavior. –  EricLaw Jun 11 '13 at 16:02

5 Answers 5

I was able to do it using a combination of the other answers given. Try creating this derived class and replace any labels you wish to disable the clipboard functionality with it:

Public Class LabelWithOptionalCopyTextOnDoubleClick
    Inherits Label

    Private Const WM_LBUTTONDCLICK As Integer = &H203

    Private clipboardText As String

    <DefaultValue(False)> _
    <Description("Overrides default behavior of Label to copy label text to clipboard on double click")> _
    Public Property CopyTextOnDoubleClick As Boolean

    Protected Overrides Sub OnDoubleClick(e As System.EventArgs)
        If Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(clipboardText) Then Clipboard.SetData(DataFormats.Text, clipboardText)
        clipboardText = Nothing
        MyBase.OnDoubleClick(e)
    End Sub

    Protected Overrides Sub WndProc(ByRef m As System.Windows.Forms.Message)
        If Not CopyTextOnDoubleClick Then
            If m.Msg = WM_LBUTTONDCLICK Then
                Dim d As IDataObject = Clipboard.GetDataObject() 
                If d.GetDataPresent(DataFormats.Text) Then
                    clipboardText = d.GetData(DataFormats.Text)
                End If
            End If
        End If

        MyBase.WndProc(m)
    End Sub

End Class
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This worked for me, thank you. I feel like this answer should be marked as the correct one now since it preserves the content that was already on the clipboard. –  Cuthbert May 21 '13 at 18:11
    
Of course, this only preserves the text. If the clipboard contains anything in those formats tricky to handle in managed code, you're out of luck. I think the best way to save and restore all contents would be pair of unmanaged functions. –  Medinoc Dec 5 '13 at 16:38

I have found this post. The last poster seems to have been given a solution by Microsoft, albeit not a perfect solution.

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2  
The solution presented in that post seems to clear out the clipboard, which is more of a sidestep. But a little preferable to the earlier behavior, in my opinion. –  DavidCarroll Mar 25 '10 at 23:19
    
+1 for the post that helped me with my solution –  TKTS Jul 27 '11 at 21:29

TKTS solution converted to C#

For beginners: (add new class, build, go to designer and from toolbox drag and drop position named 'LabelWithOptionalCopyTextOnDoubleClick')

using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System;

public class LabelWithOptionalCopyTextOnDoubleClick : Label
{
    private const int WM_LBUTTONDCLICK = 0x203;
    private string clipboardText;

    [DefaultValue(false)]
    [Description("Overrides default behavior of Label to copy label text to clipboard on double click")]
    public bool CopyTextOnDoubleClick { get; set; }

    protected override void OnDoubleClick(EventArgs e)
    {
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(clipboardText))
            Clipboard.SetData(DataFormats.Text, clipboardText);
        clipboardText = null;
        base.OnDoubleClick(e);
    }

    protected override void WndProc(ref Message m)
    {
        if (!CopyTextOnDoubleClick)
        {
            if (m.Msg == WM_LBUTTONDCLICK)
            {
                IDataObject d = Clipboard.GetDataObject();
                if (d.GetDataPresent(DataFormats.Text))
                    clipboardText = (string)d.GetData(DataFormats.Text);
            }
        }
        base.WndProc(ref m);
    }

}
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My solution (terribly ugly, but it seems to work) was to copy clipboard text to a local variable on single-click, and restore it on double-click if the clipboard differs from the local variable. Obviously the precursor to a double-click is the first single-click, which is why it works.

I'm going to star this question because I'd love a cleaner method!

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When internal text value is empty then double clicking on label not trying to copy text value to clipboard. This method more cleaner than other alternatives I think:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

public class LabelNoCopy : Label
{
    private string text;

    public override string Text
    {
        get
        {
            return text;
        }
        set
        {
            if (value == null)
            {
                value = "";
            }

            if (text != value)
            {
                text = value;
                Refresh();
                OnTextChanged(EventArgs.Empty);
            }
        }
    }
}
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