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I am working on a C# generic function. When error, if the generic type can be new-able, return new T(), otherwise return default(T).

The code like this:

private T Func<T>()
{
    try
    {
        // try to do something...
    }
    catch (Exception exception)
    {
        if (T is new-able) // <---------- How to do this?
        {
            return new T();
        }
        else
        {
            return default(T);
        }
    }
}

I know it needs where T : new() for those using new T(). This question is, how to judge this on runtime?

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7  
Although achievable using reflection, this indicates a rather smelly convention for callers of that method IMHO. Can you describe a bit better what exactly is that you're trying to do? –  Groo Aug 8 '14 at 6:53
1  
Unless I'm mistaken can you not just use return Activator.CreateInstance(T)? –  Sayse Aug 8 '14 at 6:53
    
@Sayse No, that will throw exception if no parameterless constructor defined. –  Sriram Sakthivel Aug 8 '14 at 6:54
    
@SriramSakthivel - Judging by the OP's example, I presumed that would be fine, but thanks –  Sayse Aug 8 '14 at 6:55
4  
This seems like a really bad design. Even then, your code doesn't seem to implement your design goals: you seem to want to absolutely never let any thrown exception be visible outside of your function. But what if new T() throws? –  hvd Aug 8 '14 at 7:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You just need to check whether the type has a parameterless constructor. You do it by callingType.GetConstructor method with empty types as parameter.

var constructorInfo = typeof(T).GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes);
if(constructorInfo != null)
{
   //here you go
   object instance = constructorInfo.Invoke(null);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! In here you go section, how can I use constructorInfo to new instance? –  Junle Li Aug 8 '14 at 6:55
    
@LiJunLe Updated my answer, You'll have to call constructorInfo.Invoke –  Sriram Sakthivel Aug 8 '14 at 6:58
    
Get it! Thanks! –  Junle Li Aug 8 '14 at 6:58

If I remember correctly, Activator.CreateInstance<T> will return an object constructed with the parameterless constructor if T is a class or a default(T) if T is a struct.

You can use the technique in Sriram's answer to first make sure a parameterless constructor exists for T.

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4  
If no parameterless constructor, it will throw exception. Isn't it? –  Sriram Sakthivel Aug 8 '14 at 6:53
    
@SriramSakthivel I think so. I've edited to mention that. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Aug 8 '14 at 6:54
    
in that case you can still catch the exception and return default(T)... not perfectly performant but otherwise ok. –  BatteryBackupUnit Aug 8 '14 at 6:59
    
@BatteryBackupUnit - Exceptions should be there to catch the exceptional, not for program flow –  Sayse Aug 8 '14 at 7:01
    
@Sayse well i agree in general but not necessarily for this specific example. I think it's ok to define such rules in your team / company, but postulating this as a "hard rule" without explaining it in detail is basically falling back to a (kind of fanatic) behavior which was somewhat obsolete since the age of enlightment. As for the topic at hand stackoverflow.com/questions/729379/… contains quite some information. –  BatteryBackupUnit Aug 8 '14 at 8:55

You could something like checking for a default constructor and execute new T() if one is found. To do this you could use something like:

var constructor = typeof(T).GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes);
if(constructor != null)
{
    return (T)constructor.Invoke(null);
}
else
{
    return default(T);
}
share|improve this answer
    
new T(); won't compile. Because there is no new() constraint defined. –  Sriram Sakthivel Aug 8 '14 at 6:59
    
oh yes...you're right. Did not realize that. There would be no need to check for the default constructor if the constraint would be in place –  MarcoLaser Aug 8 '14 at 7:01
    
Thanks for your suggestion, but I cannot use new T() here. Because that must declare where T : new() which I should avoid. –  Junle Li Aug 8 '14 at 7:01
    
I have updated my answer according to @SriramSakthivel –  MarcoLaser Aug 8 '14 at 7:05

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