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I have problems using setof/3, some results are missing.

The context:

I load a xml-file using SWI-Prolog load_xml() to get a recursive list element (see testelement in the example). Then I want to look up specific elements in this list (in the xml tree).
Using findall/3 combined with sort/2, it works fine. But if I use setof/3, I miss one result. I suppose that setof/3 has problems due to the recursive call in askElement/3 to get/keep the elements? Knows anyone another solution to get the elements out of the recursive list?

My test code:

testElement([element('recipeml',[version=0.5], 
    [element('recipe',[],
        [element('head',[],
            [element('title',[],['Spaghetti Bolognese']
            )]
        ),
        element('ing-div',[type=titled], 
            [element('title',[],['sauce']),
             element('ingredients',[],
                [element('ing',[],
                    [element('item',[],['hackfleisch']),
                     element('item',[],['fleischtomaten']),
                     element('item',[],['zwiebeln']),
                     element('item',[],['sellerie']
                    )]
                )]
            )]
        )]
    ),
    element('recipe',[],
        [element('head',[],
            [element('title',[],['Erbsensuppe']
            )]
        ),
        element('ing-div',[type=titled], 
            [element('title',[],['elementar']),
             element('ingredients',[],
                [element('ing',[],
                    [element('item',[],['sahne']),
                     element('item',[],['erbsen']),
                     element('item',[],['gemüsebrühe']
                    )]
                )]
            )]
        )]
    )] 
)]).

askElement(Name, Child, Parent) :-
    (
        member( element(Name,_,Child),Parent)
    ;
        member( element(_,_,NewParent),Parent),
        [_|_] = NewParent,
        askElement(Name, Child, NewParent)
    ).

allRecipes_findall(RecipeName) :-
    testElement(Knot),
    findall(TmpR,(askElement('head',HKnot,Knot),askElement('title',TmpR,HKnot)),Bag),
    sort(Bag, RecipeName).

allRecipes_setof(RecipeName) :-
    testElement(Knot),
    setof(TmpR,(askElement('head',HKnot,Knot),askElement('title',TmpR,HKnot)),RecipeName).

My Output:

3 ?- allRecipes_findall(X).
X = [['Erbsensuppe'], ['Spaghetti Bolognese']].

4 ?- allRecipes_setof(X).
X = [['Erbsensuppe']] 

I expected that in both case I get

X = [['Erbsensuppe'], ['Spaghetti Bolognese']].

What's wrong?

Many thanks in advance!

PS: Every comment/review of my (first try of) Prolog code is very welcome :}

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The standard setof/3 predicate gives you a solution per each different instantiation of the free variables in the goal. Using your code as-is gives:

?- allRecipes_findall(X).
X = [['Erbsensuppe'], ['Spaghetti Bolognese']].

?- allRecipes_setof(X).
X = [['Erbsensuppe']] ;
X = [['Spaghetti Bolognese']].

That's the expected result. You can, however, make setof/3 ignore the free variables by existentially quantifying them using the ^/2 operator:

allRecipes_setof(RecipeName) :-
    testElement(Knot),
    setof(TmpR,HKnot^(askElement('head',HKnot,Knot),askElement('title',TmpR,HKnot)),RecipeName).

With this change you'll get the same result as with the findall/3 predicate:

?- allRecipes_setof(X).
X = [['Erbsensuppe'], ['Spaghetti Bolognese']].

Regarding comments on your programming style, use underscores instead of CamelCase in atoms for code readability. E.g. ask_element instead of askElement. For variables, on the other hand, CamelCase is often used.

share|improve this answer
    
Great :-) In my larger program I did a cut (!) so I was not aware Prolog would have more than 1 solution. And in my simple example I just forgot to type a ";". Great, thanks, that helps. And the ^/2 operator, to be honest, is new to me...as the whole prolog stuff... The way I run through the testElement is more or less ok/efficient? –  kiw Aug 8 at 9:22
1  
I suggest you use a different representation in the third argument of the element/3 term in order to easily distinguish between child and non-child elements instead of using a list in both cases. This would allow you to improve the definition of the askElement/3 predicate. Note that [_|_] also unifies with e.g. ['Spaghetti Bolognese'] so you're not making the two cases exclusive. –  Paulo Moura Aug 8 at 9:33
    
Thanks again :-) With your first suggestion, I am not sure what you mean. Should I give the element 'title' in the path 'recipe-head-title' a unique name to distinguish it from 'recipe-ingdiv-title', so I do not need to call askElement twice? I can't do this as I want to use a given xml-format. Or do you mean something else? Thanks for the remark concerning '[|]', I will change it to 'is_list'. –  kiw Aug 8 at 9:47
1  
I mean using a representation such as element(..., ..., child(Child)) for leaf nodes and element(..., ..., descendants([Descendant1, ...])) or simply element(..., ..., [Descendant1, ...]) for nodes with descendants. I.e. make the third argument of element/3 term use different functors. –  Paulo Moura Aug 8 at 11:05
1  
oh, uups. Now I got it. Good idea :-) Then I only have to look for a child when looking for an element. I will think about it. As I got the testElement from load_xml in SWI-Prolog, I will probably transform it in your suggested representation once before further use. Thanks again :) –  kiw Aug 8 at 11:26

Paulo already give plenty of advice about your current code. I'm here only to suggest to take advantage of library(xpath) when you need to handle XML. It does require a bit of exercise, but then you are rewarded with much functionality... for your example:

?- [library(xpath)].
true.

?- testElement(E), xpath(E, //head//title(text), T).
...
T = 'Spaghetti Bolognese' ;
...
T = 'Erbsensuppe' ;
false.
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! (filler text due to speechlessness) –  mat Aug 8 at 13:13
    
use_module(library(xpath)) –  false Aug 9 at 12:58
    
Thanks again. It works in both versions: :- use_module(library(xpath)). or :- [library(xpath)]. –  kiw Aug 11 at 7:00

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