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var list = new List<int>();
for(int i=0;i<10;i++) list.Add(i); 
for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
{
     ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
         new WaitCallback(x => {
             Console.WriteLine(x);  
         }), list[i]);
} 

And i want to know when all threadpools threads finished their work. How i can to do that?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You'll need to track this yourself.

One option for this is to use a counter and a reset event:

int toProcess = 10;
using(ManualResetEvent resetEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false))
{
    var list = new List<int>();
    for(int i=0;i<10;i++) list.Add(i); 
    for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
    {
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
           new WaitCallback(x => {
              Console.WriteLine(x);  
              // Safely decrement the counter
              if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref toProcess)==0)
                 resetEvent.Set();

           }),list[i]);
    } 

    resetEvent.WaitOne();
}
// When the code reaches here, the 10 threads will be done
Console.WriteLine("Done");
share|improve this answer
    
lol. I think 'done' is better name that 'mre' though –  Remus Rusanu Mar 25 '10 at 23:38
    
@Remus: that better? –  Reed Copsey Mar 25 '10 at 23:48
    
Of course, it makes all the difference ;) –  Remus Rusanu Mar 25 '10 at 23:49
    
Don't forget to dispose the reset event - unmanaged resource. –  Aaronaught Mar 25 '10 at 23:49
2  
@Neir0: Since many threads will be potentially doing it at the same time, you need to protect that decrement. There are two options - use Interlocked, or use some form of locking. If you just use --toProcess, and two threads try to do it at the exact same time, you won't ever reach zero. –  Reed Copsey Mar 26 '10 at 0:40

I am not sure if ThreadPool exposes such functionality but you can use wait handles and by the way iterating twice seems unnecessary:

var events = new ManualResetEvent[10];
var list = new List<int>();
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    list.Add(i);
    events[i] = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    int j = i;
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(x => {
        Console.WriteLine(x);
        events[j].Set();
    }, list[i]);
}
WaitHandle.WaitAll(events);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - same solution as I posted; only you were quicker and presented slightly more elegant code. –  Fredrik Mörk Mar 25 '10 at 23:42
    
OK, you were faster than I, too. –  Timores Mar 25 '10 at 23:45
7  
Just a warning with this... WaitHandle.WaitAll will fail if you have more than 64 items in an STA thread... –  Reed Copsey Mar 25 '10 at 23:47
    
@Reed, good point. –  Darin Dimitrov Mar 25 '10 at 23:53
1  
Why create 10 events when you only need 1? –  ChaosPandion Mar 25 '10 at 23:57

In .NET Framework 4+ use the handy System.Threading.CountdownEvent class:

const int threadCount = 10;
var list = new List<int>(threadCount);
for (var i = 0; i < threadCount; i++) list.Add(i);

using (var countdownEvent = new CountdownEvent(threadCount))
{
    for (var i = 0; i < threadCount; i++)
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
            x =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine(x);
                countdownEvent.Signal();
            }, list[i]);

    countdownEvent.Wait();
}
Console.WriteLine("done");
share|improve this answer

The thread pool does not tell you when the thread has finished executing, so the work item must do it itself. I changed the code like this:

    var list = new List<int>();
    ManualResetEvent[] handles = new ManualResetEvent[10];
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        list.Add(i);
        handles[i] = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
         new WaitCallback(x =>
         {
             Console.WriteLine(x);
             handles[(int) x].Set();
         }), list[i]);
    }

    WaitHandle.WaitAll(handles);
share|improve this answer

This is how I would do it.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var items = new[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 };
        using (var countdown = new Countdown(items.Length))
        {
            foreach (var item in items)
            {
                ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(o =>
                {
                    Thread.SpinWait(100000000);
                    Console.WriteLine("Thread Done!");
                    countdown.Signal();
                });
            }
            countdown.Wait();
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Job Done!");
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    public class Countdown : IDisposable
    {
        private readonly ManualResetEvent done;
        private readonly int total;
        private volatile int current;

        public Countdown(int total)
        {
            this.total = total;
            current = total;
            done = new ManualResetEvent(false);
        }

        public void Signal()
        {
            lock (done)
            {
                if (current > 0 && --current == 0)
                    done.Set();
            }
        }

        public void Wait()
        {
            done.WaitOne();
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            done.Dispose();
        }
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
This would be more performant using Interlocked.Decrement instead of a lock. See my answer for the relevant code. –  Reed Copsey Mar 26 '10 at 0:00
    
Calling done.Dispose() in Countdown is incorrect, gives "inaccessible due to its protection level". It should be done.Close() as Close and Dispose are equivalent. –  AceJordin Nov 18 '11 at 17:43

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