Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
R=10;
LPCSTR cs;
string s;
stringstream ss;
ss<<R;
s = ss.str();
cout << cs <<endl;

Will give me the console output 10, like it should be.

Now I wanted to put this into a function:

const char * doubleToLPSTR(double x){
string s;
stringstream ss;
ss << x;
s = ss.str();
return s.c_str();

}

But

R = 10;
LPCSTR cs;
string s;
cs = doubleToLPSTR(R);
cout << cs << endl;

Returns does not work.... Why???

Thank you for your help, like this?

const char * doubleToLPSTR(double x){

const int size = 20;
char *cs = new char[size];

string s;
stringstream ss;
ss << x;
s = ss.str();
const char * tempAr = s.c_str();


for (int i = 0; i < size; i++){

    cs[i] = tempAr[i];

}

return cs;
}
share|improve this question
    
What type is R? Do you want to use it as a parameter to a function? what exactly are you trying to accomplish, and what is the problem? – TommyA Aug 8 '14 at 11:31
    
possible duplicate of Double to Const Char* – duDE Aug 8 '14 at 11:31
    
Maybe the function you are looking for is std::to_string. – nwp Aug 8 '14 at 11:31
    
I have read your post and I really dont know what you are trying to accomplish. You dont know how to pass const char* to function or what? – Dakorn Aug 8 '14 at 11:35
1  
up vote 2 down vote accepted

why don't you return a string from the function instead of char*? like:

const string doubleToStr(double x){
  stringstream ss;
  ss << x;
  return ss.str();
}

R = 10;
string s;
s = doubleToStr(R);
cout << s << endl;

and if you really need a char*, you can use 's.c_str()' after the code above

share|improve this answer
    
I think it is not right answer for his question. He want to get const char* as return type so he is expecting such solution. – Dakorn Aug 8 '14 at 11:47
    
jap I want a const char * back – newandlost Aug 8 '14 at 11:56
    
if you really want a const char*, then you can allocate the memory for it in the converter function and free it from the caller (and that's C, not C++) – glezmen Aug 8 '14 at 11:59
    
@newandlost: There's no (sensible) way to do that. Just return a string, and let the caller use c_str() if they really need a pointer for some reason. (The alternatives are a static array, which will be unexpectedly overwritten on the next call, or a dynamic array, which is bound to lead to memory leaks. Don't do that if you value your sanity.) – Mike Seymour Aug 8 '14 at 12:16
    
You shouldn't make the return type const; that prevents move semantics when you assign it to s. – Mike Seymour Aug 8 '14 at 12:18

Variable string s is a local variable in function doubleToLPSTR.

During runtime, once you're "out of" this function, this variable is destroyed.

So with return s.c_str(), you are essentially invoking undefined behavior.

The outcome of any attempt to access the returned address would be inconsistent.

share|improve this answer

By the looks of it, the return value doesn't really need to be a char* - you are just outputting the return value after all - which means that you could use a string. (That is, of course there is a reason it needs to be a char* that you have omitted for brevity?)

Rather than having to convert the double to a string yourself then you can use the String class which has a method "std::to_string()" which can convert all numeric types, including double.

More information on that can be found here.

But the basic usage in your case would be...

R = 10;
std::cout << std::to_string(R) <<std::endl;
share|improve this answer
    
ja, because in the end its for a WIN32 function accepting LPCSTR – newandlost Aug 8 '14 at 11:57
const char * doubleToLPSTR(double x){

const int size = 20;
char *cs = new char[size];

string s;
stringstream ss;
ss << x;
s = ss.str();
const char * tempAr = s.c_str();


for (int i = 0; i < size; i++){

    cs[i] = tempAr[i];

}

return cs;
}

And then in the program:

R = 10;
const char *cs = doubleToLPSTR(R);
cout << cs << endl;

And I needed it because i nee a LPCSTR in

CreateWindow("STATIC", cs, WS_VISIBLE | WS_CHILD | SS_RIGHT, xSC, top, bS, hEaS,
    hwnd, NULL, hInstance, NULL);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.