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I wanted to run script ./startMegaTrolling.sh 100000000000000000000000 in bash:

#!/bin/bash
if [ "$#" -ne 0 ];then 
    let "LAST = $1 - 1"
    for i in `seq 0 $LAST`
    do
        php trolling.php --processNumber=$1 &     #here
    done
fi

But how to get pid of all launched processes by this method? I tried put the >> pids.txt #here, but it does not work. I want to have got second script to kill all launched processes.

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1  
You might want to read more about Bash job control. Oh, and you're not creating threads but processes. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 8 at 11:42
    
Did you try this ps -ef|grep startMegaTrolling.sh –  prashant thakre Aug 8 at 11:43
    
Sorry, missspelling, I mean processes, not threads –  user3383675 Aug 8 at 11:45

3 Answers 3

Use $! to access the pid of the most recently launched background process. Thus:

#!/bin/bash
# ^- shebang is mandatory since we use bash-only features
if (( $# )); then
  for (( i=$1; i>0; i-- )); do
    php trolling.php --threadNumber="$1" &
    echo "$!" >>pids.txt
  done
fi
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You can collect the process ids as you start the processes, then kill them all later.

#!/bin/bash
if [ "$#" -ne 0 ];then 
    LAST=$(( $1 - 1 ))   # let is a bit antiquated
    for i in `seq 0 $LAST`
    do
        php trolling.php --threadNumber=$1 &
        pids="$pids $!"
    done
fi

# Later on
kill $pids

Technically, an array is a better than a space-separated string for collecting a series of items, but since a process ID is guaranteed to be a simple integer, it works fine here.


For full POSIX compliance (which isn't required by the question, based on the bash tag), you can't use either seq or a C-style for loop, and will have to use a while loop instead.

if [ "$#" -ne 0 ]; then
    LAST=$(( $1 - 1 ))
    i=0
    while [ "$i" -ne "$LAST" ]; do
        php trolling.php --threadNumber="$1" &
        pids="$pids $!"
        i=$((i+1))
    done
fi
share|improve this answer
    
If there isn't an external requirement to keep the list on disk (which, rereading, there isn't), this is certainly more efficient / better practice. I'm keeping my own answer around only because of this one's dependency on the non-standard seq. –  Charles Duffy Aug 8 at 11:50
    
Agreed. I guess the fact that you can always write a while loop kept POSIX from adopting a standard implementation for seq (or some other functionally similar command)? –  chepner Aug 8 at 12:40

You can try something like this:

pid: ps aux | grep <NAME_OF_YOUR_APP> | awk '{print $2}'

then:

kill -9 $pid  > /dev/null 2>&1 &
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1  
Don't use kill -9; that's a last resort for buggy programs. –  chepner Aug 8 at 11:47
    
...also, no reason to grep the process table for your own direct children; you find out their PID when you launch them. –  Charles Duffy Aug 8 at 11:47
    
if you want to kill processes immediately after creating them in the same script chepner has the best answer. My answer here was if you want to use a different stop script called for example from a /etc/init.d/ script –  dtrihinas Aug 8 at 11:51
    
My preferred way to do this with a separate shutdown script is with a lockfile and fuser -k to kill only the processes that have the lockfile open. That way you have a stronger assurance of only hitting your real targets than what grepping ps gives you -- you don't want to also kill vim <NAME_OF_YOUR_APP>, after all. –  Charles Duffy Aug 8 at 11:55

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