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I wish to make sure that my data has a constraint the following check (constraint?) in place

  • This table can only have one BorderColour per hub/category. (eg. #FFAABB)
  • But it can have multiple nulls. (all the other rows are nulls, for this field)

Table Schema

ArticleId INT PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL IDENTITY
HubId TINYINT NOT NULL
CategoryId INT NOT NULL
Title NVARCHAR(100) NOT NULL
Content NVARCHAR(MAX) NOT NULL
BorderColour VARCHAR(7) -- Can be nullable.

I'm gussing I would have to make a check constraint? But i'm not sure how, etc.

sample data.

1, 1, 1, 'test', 'blah...', '#FFAACC'
1, 1, 1, 'test2', 'sfsd', NULL
1, 1, 2, 'Test3', 'sdfsd dsf s', NULL
1, 1, 2, 'Test4', 'sfsdsss', '#AABBCC'

now .. if i add the following line, i should get some sql error....

INSERT INTO tblArticle VALUES (1, 2, 'aaa', 'bbb', '#ABABAB')

any ideas?

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You will get an error already, you didn't specify a value for CategoryID. –  JohnFx Mar 26 '10 at 0:32
    
True, i forgot to put the keyword IDENTITY onto in the schema, in this post. (I just manually typed up that schema .. not cut/paste from SSMS). fixed :) –  Pure.Krome Mar 26 '10 at 0:35
    
you still need to fix the INSERT statement to either specify the column names or add a DEFAULT for the first column. –  JohnFx Mar 26 '10 at 3:49
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Another option that is available is available if you are running SQL2008. This version of SQL has a feature called filtered indexes.

Using this feature you can create a unique index that includes all rows except those where BorderColour is null.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[UniqueExceptNulls](
    [HubId] [tinyint] NOT NULL,
    [CategoryId] [int] NOT NULL,
    [BorderColour] [varchar](7) NULL,
)

GO

CREATE UNIQUE NONCLUSTERED  INDEX UI_UniqueExceptNulls
ON [UniqueExceptNulls] (HubID,CategoryID)
WHERE BorderColour IS NOT NULL

This approach is cleaner than the approach in my other answer because it doesn't require creating extra computed columns. It also doesn't require you to have a unique column in the table, although you should have that anyway.

Finally, it will also be much faster than the UDF/Check Constraint solutions.

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I think you want to have only HubID and CategoryID in your filtered index. There can only be one BorderColour for each combination, so each combination should appear only once. I wish my work installation had SQL Server 2008, I'd be much more up to date on these cool new features. –  Cade Roux Mar 26 '10 at 3:39
    
Actually you want all three fields in the index. You need BorderColour to make sure you don't get duplicates across the three fields. The WHERE condition removes the rows with NULL bordercolor from the index and the uniqueness check. –  JohnFx Mar 26 '10 at 3:47
    
Win, win and Win. Cheers. much cleaner and confirmed that it's working. Cheers mate :) –  Pure.Krome Mar 26 '10 at 4:32
    
Note that this is a constraint workaround because the NULL behavior in SQL Server is non-standard and there is a connect item on that: connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/299229/… –  Cade Roux Mar 26 '10 at 4:39
    
@JohnFx, I just finally have time to test this and you definitely need to remove BorderColour, or the following will succeed, which will violate the requirements: INSERT INTO dbo.UniqueExceptNulls VALUES ( 0, 0, 'a' ) INSERT INTO dbo.UniqueExceptNulls VALUES ( 0, 0, 'b' ) –  Cade Roux Mar 26 '10 at 20:04
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CHECK constraints are ordinarily applied to a single row, however, you can cheat using a UDF:

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.CheckSingleBorderColorPerHubCategory
(
    @HubID tinyint,
    @CategoryID int
)
RETURNS BIT
AS BEGIN
    RETURN CASE
        WHEN EXISTS
        (
            SELECT HubID, CategoryID, COUNT(*) AS BorderColorCount
            FROM Articles
            WHERE HubID = @HubID
                AND CategoryID = @CategoryID
                AND BorderColor IS NOT NULL
            GROUP BY HubID, CategoryID
            HAVING COUNT(*) > 1
        ) THEN 1
        ELSE 0
    END
END

Then create the constraint and reference the UDF:

ALTER TABLE Articles
ADD CONSTRAINT CK_Articles_SingleBorderColorPerHubCategory
CHECK (dbo.CheckSingleBorderColorPerHubCategory(HubID, CategoryID) = 1)
share|improve this answer
    
That approach could be a major performance killer, depending on how many inserts you are doing. –  JohnFx Mar 26 '10 at 0:38
    
@JohnFx: You're right, actually it's possible to optimize this, about to edit. –  Aaronaught Mar 26 '10 at 0:39
    
No offense. It looks like it would work. I'm just saying that check constraints based on UDF's with queries in them can get ugly with big inserts/updates. –  JohnFx Mar 26 '10 at 0:42
    
@JohnFx: With the WHERE added in there it should be fine as long as those columns are indexed. –  Aaronaught Mar 26 '10 at 0:43
    
Better, but I still think a Unique Index/constraint solution (see my other answers) is going to be more performant. –  JohnFx Mar 26 '10 at 3:33
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You can also do a trigger with something like this (this is actually overkill - you can make it cleaner by assuming the database is already in a valid state - i.e. UNION instead of UNION all etc):

IF EXISTS (
    SELECT COUNT(BorderColour)
    FROM (
             SELECT INSERTED.HubId, INSERTED.CategoryId, INSERTED.BorderColour
             UNION ALL
             SELECT HubId, CategoryId, BorderColour
             FROM tblArticle
             WHERE EXISTS (
                 SELECT *
                 FROM INSERTED
                 WHERE tblArticle.HubId = INSERTED.HubId
                       AND tblArticle.CategoryId = INSERTED.CategoryId
             )
    ) AS X
    GROUP BY HubId, CategoryId
    HAVING COUNT(BorderColour) > 1
)
RAISEERROR
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I usually do - although you generally have a ROLLBACK in there in addition to the RAISERROR unless it's an INSTEAD OF trigger. –  Aaronaught Mar 26 '10 at 0:45
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If you have a unique column in your table, then you can accomplish this by creating a unique constraint on a computer column.

The following sample created a table that behaved as you described in your requirements and should perform better than a UDF based check constraint. You might also be able to improve the performance further by making the computed column persisted.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[UQTest](
    [Id] INT IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [HubId] TINYINT NOT NULL,
    [CategoryId] INT NOT NULL,
    [BorderColour] varchar(7) NULL,
    [BorderColourUNQ]  AS (CASE WHEN [BorderColour] IS NULL 
                               THEN cast([ID] as varchar(50))
                               ELSE cast([HuBID] as varchar(3)) + '_' + 
                                    cast([CategoryID] as varchar(20)) END
                           ),
 CONSTRAINT [UQTest_Unique] 
 UNIQUE  ([BorderColourUNQ])
) 

The one possibly undesirable facet of the above implementation is that it allows a category/hub to have both a Null AND a color defined. If this is a problem, let me know and I'll tweak my answer to address that.

PS: Sorry about my previous (incorrect) answer. I didn't read the question closely enough.

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