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Here's the story. I created an interface, IVehicle. I explicitly implemented the interface in my class, Vehicle.cs.

Here is my interface:

Interface IVehicle
{
        int getWheel();
}

here is my class:

class Vehicle: IVehicle
{

     public int IVehicle.getWheel()
     {
         return wheel;
     }

     public void printWheel()
     {
         Console.WriteLine(getWheel());
     }
}

Notice that "getWheel()" is explicitly implemented. Now, when I try to call that method within my Vehicle class, I receive an error indicating that getWheel() does not exist in the current context. Can someone help me understand what I am doing wrong?

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@tyrone302: welcome to SO. Here are some tips. Take the time to read stackoverflow.com/faq. You don't need to put C# in the title, considering it's in a tag. Please don't include "hello" and "thank you" and such into the question: this is a Question and Answer site, not a discussion forum. Those things may be polite during a discussion, but they're not part of your question. Thanks. –  John Saunders Mar 26 '10 at 2:01
    
AS a java person, I am wondering why this convoluted thing exists ? Why would anyone want the above to exist, what advantage does it gain ? –  mP. Mar 26 '10 at 2:11
    
Specifying a visibility modifier on an explicitely implemented member is a syntax error. The member is always accessible once your object has been casted to your interface type. –  Trillian Mar 26 '10 at 2:14
1  
@mP If you are implementing multiple interfaces with a common member, this allows you to supply different definitions of it per interface. Also it adds to clean up intellisense, because the explicit members aren't visible or usable unless you cast to the proper interface. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Dec 21 '10 at 18:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

When you explicitly implement the interface, you first have to cast the object to the interface, then you can call the method. In other words, the method is only available when the method is invoked on the object as the interface type, not as the concrete type.

class Vehicle: IVehicle {

     public int IVehicle.getWheel()
     {
         return wheel;
     }

     public void printWheel()
     {
         Console.WriteLine( ((IVehicle)this).getWheel() );
     }
}

See this reference at MSDN for more information. Here's the relevant snippet:

It is not possible to access an explicit interface member implementation through its fully qualified name in a method invocation, property access, or indexer access. An explicit interface member implementation can only be accessed through an interface instance, and is in that case referenced simply by its member name.

For what it's worth -- this probably isn't a particularly good use of explicit interface implementation. Typically, you want to use explicit implementation when you have a class that has a full interface for typical operations but also implements an interface that may supersede some of those operations. The canonical example is a File class that implements IDisposable. It would have a Close() method but be required to implement Dispose(). When treating as a File you would use Open/Close. When opened in a using statement, however, it will treat it as an IDisposable and call Dispose. In this case Dispose simply calls Close. You wouldn't necessarily want to expose Dispose as part of the File implementation since the same behavior is available from Close.

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Thanks. I only did it to prove to myself that I could do it. To this point, the book I am using didn't give any reason indicating the need to explicitly implement the interface. –  tyrone302 Mar 26 '10 at 18:26

According to MSDN:

It is possible to implement an interface member explicitly—creating a class member that is only called through the interface, and is specific to that interface.

And in the C# language specifications:

It is not possible to access an explicit interface member implementation through its fully qualified name in a method invocation, property access, or indexer access. An explicit interface member implementation can only be accessed through an interface instance, and is in that case referenced simply by its member name.

To access this member you can first cast the class to the interface, and then access it.

share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? –  Yuriy Faktorovich Mar 26 '10 at 2:06
    
You are right actually +1 –  Tarik Mar 26 '10 at 2:09

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