Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a mapreduce project where I cannot guarantee beforehand that my mapper will always be given a usable keyvalue pair. I tried surrounding the relevant code with a try catch block like so

public void map(LongWritable Key, Text values, Context context)
                throws IOException, InterruptedException {

            try {
                    //Attempt process

                    context.write(HKey, HValue);

                }
            } catch (Exception e) {
                //was given invalid value, drop it and move on
                context.nextKeyValue();
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
}

Memory profiling this on a large dataset reveals that MapOutputBuffers are taking up most of my memory, giving me an eventual out of memory error. Is there a better way to structure my Mapper so I dont have this issue? I'd rather not have to allocate extra memory as a stopgap.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think that printing stack trace is useless, I am using this code:

// Define enumeration    
    public static enum LOCAL_COUNTER_MAP {
                INVALID 
            }   


        public void map(LongWritable Key, Text values, Context context)
                            throws IOException, InterruptedException {

                        try {
                                //Attempt process

                                context.write(HKey, HValue);

                            }
                        } catch (Exception e) {
                        // ignore value
                          context.getCounter(LOCAL_COUNTER_MAP.INVALID).increment(1);
                          return;
                        }
            }

In your job result you will than see how many of mappers had invalid keyvalue pair.

Good luck :)

share|improve this answer
    
The printing stack trace isnt really the issue, although thats a really good way to handle that. I'm gonna do it to stop my log files from ballooning. Anyway the issue is that even when I skipped over bad values using a return statement I ran into a gc overhead limit. –  chenab Aug 8 at 20:41
    
Ok, so the problem is that the process spent more than 98% in garbage collection and the less than 2% of heap is recovered. So try to increase heap size, look at this post, think it can help - Out of memory error –  Radek Tomšej Aug 9 at 9:03
    
Well it seems to be working now, its strange, I thought I set that in the hadoop-env file. I do wonder if there is some other memory issue I can fix but this is more then enough for now. Thank you. –  chenab Aug 11 at 14:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.