Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a little bit confused about how to unit test a constructor, particularly since it returns no value.

Let's assume I have this class:

class MyClass {

    /** @var array */
    public $registered_items;

    /**
     * Register all of the items upon instantiation
     *
     * @param  array  $myArrayOfItems  an array of objects
     */
    public function __construct($myArrayOfItems) {
        foreach($myArrayOfItems as $myItem) {
            $this->registerItem($myItem);
        }
    }

    /**
     * Register a single item
     *
     * @param  object  $item  a single item with properties 'slug' and 'data'
     */
    private function registerItem($item) {
        $this->registered_items[$item->slug] = $item->data; 
    }

}

Obviously this is a bit contrived and incredibly simple, but it's for the sake of the question. =)

So yeah, how would I go about writing a unit test for the constructor here?

Bonus question: am I right in thinking that no unit test for registerItem() would be needed in a case such as this?

EDIT

How about if I re-factored to remove the logic from the constructor. How would I test registerItem() in this case?

class MyClass {

    /** @var array */
    public $registered_items;

    public function __construct() {
        // Nothing at the moment
    }

    /**
     * Register all of the items
     *
     * @param  array  $myArrayOfItems  an array of objects
     */
    public function registerItem($myArrayOfItems) {
        foreach($myArrayOfItems as $item) {
            $this->registered_items[$item->slug] = $item->data;
        }

    }

}
share|improve this question
    
A class constructor instantiates an object, so you can test that an object of the right type has been successfully created; but it is generally considered bad practise to have any significant code in the constructor –  Mark Baker Aug 8 '14 at 22:14
    
Thanks Mark! How about if I re-factored as shown above? –  Pete Aug 8 '14 at 22:24
    
You'd still test object instantiation the same way, testing for the successful creation of an object of the right type; but it's probably also worth making your registerItem() method public (so it can be tested) and creating a public method to retrieve registered items, so you can also test those elements of your code –  Mark Baker Aug 8 '14 at 22:29
    
Ah yes, I meant to make registerItems() public in that refactor. Typo, haha. –  Pete Aug 8 '14 at 22:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For First Code

public function testConstruct{
    $arrayOfItems = your array;

    $myClass = new MyClass($arrayOfItems);

    foreach($arrayOfItems as $myItem) {
       $expected_registered_items[$item->slug] = $item->data;
    }

    $this->assertEquals($expected_registered_items, $myClass->registered_items);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is it considered bad practice to look at $myClass->registered_items since it's not technically part of the method I'm testing? –  Pete Aug 8 '14 at 22:33
    
Also, in the refactored code it was meant to be public :-| . I've corrected it. –  Pete Aug 8 '14 at 22:35
    
In your case it is only way to test this code –  Ferid Movsumov Aug 8 '14 at 22:35
    
I will suggest same way for refactored code too. –  Ferid Movsumov Aug 8 '14 at 22:37
    
Great, thanks for the input! –  Pete Aug 9 '14 at 1:02

Add a method to look up a registered item.

class MyClass {
    ...

    /**
     * Returns a registered item
     *
     * @param string $slug unique slug of the item to retrieve
     * @return object the matching registered item or null
     */
    public function getRegisteredItem($slug) {
        return isset($this->registered_items[$slug]) ? $this->registered_items[$slug] : null;
    }
}

Then check that each item passed to the constructor in the test has been registered.

class MyClassTest {
    public function testConstructorRegistersItems() {
        $item = new Item('slug');
        $fixture = new MyClass(array($item));
        assertThat($fixture->getRegisteredItem('slug'), identicalTo($item));
    }
}

Note: I'm using the Hamcrest assertions, but PHPUnit should have an equivalent.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.