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I am currently using Behave (BDD for Python) and have been digging in the source code to understand how the @given, @when and @then decorators are being declared.

The farthest I've gone is to look at step_registry.py where I found the function setup_step_decorators(context=None, registry=registry) which appears to be doing the job.

However, I don't quite understand how these decorators are created since they don't appear to be explicitly declared in the source code in the form of a def when(...):. I am under the impression that they are declared based on a list of strings (for step_type in ('given', 'when', 'then', 'step'):) that is then processed by a call to make_decorator().

Can someone walk me through the code and explain where/how these decorators are being declared?

Here is where you can get access to the source code of Behave.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, let's start at the outside:

if context is None:
    context = globals()
for step_type in ('given', 'when', 'then', 'step'):
    step_decorator = registry.make_decorator(step_type)
    context[step_type.title()] = context[step_type] = step_decorator

I think it's the last line that confuses you.

Every module's global namespace is just a dictionary. The function globals() returns that dictionary. If you modify that dictionary, you create new module globals. For example:

>>> globals()['a'] = 2
>>> a
2

In this case, by default, context = globals(). So, for, say, the first step_type, you're effectively doing this:

>>> globals()['given'] = step_decorator
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They are injected into globals() around line 90 (at that point context is globals() because context is None):

# -- Create the decorators
def setup_step_decorators(context=None, registry=registry):
    if context is None:
        context = globals()
    for step_type in ('given', 'when', 'then', 'step'):
        step_decorator = registry.make_decorator(step_type)
        context[step_type.title()] = context[step_type] = step_decorator

You can do this yourself too (globals() works just like a regular dictionary):

>>> a
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
NameError: name 'a' is not defined
>>> globals()['a'] = 5
>>> a
5
share|improve this answer
    
Almost the exact same example as me at the exact same time. But of course the right number to use in such an example is 2, not 5. :) –  abarnert Aug 9 '14 at 0:59
    
@abarnert I noticed that, weird that we both thought of 'a' there. Probably 42 is the best (or maybe 3) –  Jeff Tratner Aug 9 '14 at 1:01
    
Awesome. Thanks a lot guys, that was exactly what I was looking for. I tend to agree that the example is much easier to understand with 42 :) –  Ben Aug 9 '14 at 15:47

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