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I am trying to diagnose a weird performance problem that I think is related to a failure of GCC to inline some function calls in C++, though I am not sure which function calls. Is there a flag to GCC to list all line numbers where inlining was performed?

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marked as duplicate by luk32, Rapptz, Mark Garcia, Reto Koradi, Arion Aug 9 at 6:21

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The answer to your question is here: C++: How will i know whether inline function is actually replaced?. The question was slightly, different, but the answers are very enlightening. –  FoggyDay Aug 9 at 1:14

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The answer to your question is here:

C++: How will i know whether inline function is actually replaced?.

The question was slightly different from yours, but the responses are spot-on - and definitely enlightening. I encourage you to read them.

In answer to your question, however:-Winline will generate a warning if the compiler chooses not to inline:

https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.6.3/gcc/Warning-Options.html

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That answer does not quite answer my question. Checking the assembly is tedious, because I am not sure which call site is the problem. I have a performance regression that depends when I use separate compilation as opposed to compiling all .cpp's at once into a shared library. This strongly suggests an inlining issue to me, but doesn't tell me where. The option -Winline is somewhat limited, as the compiler can (and very often does) inline functions that are not declared inline, but -Winline does not report whether non-explicitly inlined functions are inlined. –  John Jumper Aug 9 at 1:27
    
@JohnJumper Maybe check here for more hints about assembly stackoverflow.com/questions/1289881/… If it is tedious why not automate it?? Generate assembly and check if the line you want is inlined?? –  Brandin Aug 9 at 6:15

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