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What are the key differences between IEnumerable Count() and Length?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 39 down vote accepted

By calling Count on IEnumerable<T> I'm assuming you're referring to the extension method Count on System.Linq.Enumerable. Length is not a method on IEnumerable<T> but rather a property on array types in .Net such as int[].

The difference is performance. TheLength property is guaranteed to be a O(1) operation. The complexity of the Count extension method differs based on runtime type of the object. It will attempt to cast to several types which support O(1) length lookup like ICollection<T> via a Count property. If none are available then it will enumerate all items and count them which has a complexity of O(N).

For example

int[] list = CreateSomeList();
Console.WriteLine(list.Length);  // O(1)
IEnumerable<int> e1 = list;
Console.WriteLine(e1.Count()); // O(1) 
IEnumerable<int> e2 = list.Where(x => x <> 42);
Console.WriteLine(e2.Count()); // O(N)

The value e2 is implemented as a C# iterator which does not support O(1) counting and hence the method Count must enumerate the entire collection to determine how long it is.

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List<T> doesn't have a Length property - it has a Count property. Arrays have a Length though. Count is specified in ICollection and ICollection<T> (which IList<T> extends). –  Jon Skeet Mar 26 '10 at 7:15
    
@Jon, doh. Going to blame lack of sleep here. Will update –  JaredPar Mar 26 '10 at 7:18
3  
And if your IEnumerable<T> is infinitely-long, Count() will never return... –  Roger Lipscombe Mar 26 '10 at 8:05
    
@JonSkeet and @Jared - In the context of parsing a short string[] array with say 5-10 elements... would you suggest Array.Length for performance then? –  one.beat.consumer Apr 18 '12 at 19:20
1  
@one.beat.consumer: It would still be O(1) with Count() as the array will implement ICollection<T> - but it's less efficient than using Length directly. If you already know it's an array, I'd use Length not for efficiency, but because I'd view it as more idiomatic. Likewise I'd use the Count property for anything which had a compile-time type of ICollection<T>. I'd call Count() when the compile-time expression is of type IEnumerable<T>, even if I know it's really an array behind the scenes. –  Jon Skeet Apr 18 '12 at 19:25

Little addition to Jon Skeet's comment.

There are source code of Count() extension method:

.NET 3:

public static int Count<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }
    ICollection<TSource> is2 = source as ICollection<TSource>;
    if (is2 != null)
    {
        return is2.Count;
    }
    int num = 0;
    using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            num++;
        }
    }
    return num;
}

.NET 4:

public static int Count<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }
    ICollection<TSource> is2 = source as ICollection<TSource>;
    if (is2 != null)
    {
        return is2.Count;
    }
    ICollection is3 = source as ICollection;
    if (is3 != null)
    {
        return is3.Count;
    }
    int num = 0;
    using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            num++;
        }
    }
    return num;
}
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4  
Note that in .NET 4 there's another block to check for the non-generic ICollection type too. (As that also has a Count property.) –  Jon Skeet Mar 26 '10 at 7:37
    
@Jon Skeet: thank you –  bniwredyc Mar 26 '10 at 7:58
    
Does anyone know what to use to get the Error class that this method uses? I can't seem to find it anywhere on MSDN, except for the JScript documentation. –  Moshe Katz Jun 10 '12 at 20:50
  • Length is a fixed property, e.g. of a single dimensional array or string. So there's never a count operation necessary (multi-dimensional arrays have a size of all dimensions multiplied). O(1) operation here means that retrieval time is always the same, no matter how many elements there are. A linear search would (opposed to this) be O(n).

  • The Count property on ICollections (List and List<T>, for example) can change, so it has either to be updated on Add/Remove operations, or when Count is requested after the Collection has changed. Depends on the implementation of the object.

  • The Count() method of LINQ basically iterates EVERY TIME it is called (except when the object is an ICollection type, then the ICollection.Count property is requested).

Note that IEnumerables are often not already defined object collections (like lists, arrays, hashtables etc.), but link to background operations, which generate results whenever they are requested (called deferred execution).

Typically, you have an SQL like LINQ statement like this (the typical application of deferred execution):

IEnumerable<Person> deptLeaders = 
   from p in persons
   join d in departments
      on p.ID equals d.LeaderID
   orderby p.LastName, p.FirstName
   select p;

Then, there's code like this:

if (deptLeaders.Count() > 0)
{
   ReportNumberOfDeptLeaders(deptLeaders.Count());
   if (deptLeaders.Count() > 20)
      WarnTooManyDepartmentLeaders(deptLeaders.Count());
}

So, when a warning for too many Department Leaders is issued, .NET goes FOUR TIMES through the persons, checks them against the department leaders, sorts them by name and then counts the result objects.

And this is only when persons and departments are preset value collections, not queries themselves.

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I might add that .Count() > 0 is the same thing as .Any(). –  mrjedmao Jan 9 '12 at 23:03
    
@sfjedi: I think it's not the same. Any() stops when an item has been found, while Count() iterates through all. So when having an IEnumerable, possible for deferred execution, Any() should be preferred for empty check. –  Erik Hart Feb 9 '12 at 16:15
    
Wouldn't .Any() be more efficient than .Count() > 0 then? BTW, Resharper always complains about .Count() > 0. This is why I bring it up with confidence. –  mrjedmao Feb 9 '12 at 17:47

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