Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why is it that the following code:

class swi  
{
    public static void main(String[] args)  
    {  
        int a=98;
        switch(a)
        {
            default:{ System.out.println("default");continue;}
            case 'b':{ System.out.println(a); continue;}
            case 'a':{ System.out.println(a);}
        }
        System.out.println("Switch Completed");
    }
}

Gives the error:

continue outside of loop

share|improve this question
2  
The word "doubt" isn't used that way in English, I think you mean "question". Either way, the title could be more descriptive. –  Michael Aaron Safyan Mar 26 '10 at 7:48
1  
use a better title next time! –  raj Mar 26 '10 at 7:49
1  
@TJ, as a native English speaker, trust me, it sounds very weird. You can have doubts about things, you can doubt that something is the case, etc., if you doubt something it means you don't believe it is the case, or if you are doubtful about something, you have doubts that it is true or works, but you don't use doubt to mean that you don't know or are asking a question. –  Michael Aaron Safyan Mar 26 '10 at 7:56
5  
@Michael, @TJ: I think the "doubt" thing is somehow Indian. It's very common here, do a plain search for "doubt" and you'll see it pop up loads of times. –  unwind Mar 26 '10 at 8:15
1  
@Springrbua: Right, only if you use break. If you don't, it's basically a goto, because you jump to the matching case, but then when you reach the end of that case you continue with the logic for the next, even though that case doesn't match, and so on until you fall out the bottom of the switch. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 25 '14 at 13:45

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Falling through is the standard behavior for a switch statement and so, consequently, using continue in a switch statement does not make sense. The continue statement is only used in for/while/do..while loops.

Based on my understanding of your intentions, you probably want to write:

System.out.println("default");
if ( (a == 'a') || (a == 'b') ){
    System.out.println(a);
}

I would also suggest that you place the default condition at the very end.

EDIT: It is not entirely true that continue statements cannot be used inside switch statements. A (ideally labeled) continue statement is entirely valid. For example:

public class Main {
public static void main(String[] args) {
    loop:
    for (int i=0; i<10; i++) {
        switch (i) {
        case 1:
        case 3:
        case 5:
        case 7:
        case 9:
            continue loop;
        }

        System.out.println(i);
    }
}
}

This will produce the following output: 0 2 4 6 8

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, @autonomoustech, you should provide a separate answer or use a comment for such a substantial edit to an answer. –  Michael Aaron Safyan Mar 25 '14 at 4:55

The continue-Statement may be used in loops and not in switch. What you probably want is a break.

share|improve this answer

continue inside switch??!!! only break can be kept inside switch.!

ur code should be,

class swi22  
{
     public static void main(String[] args)  
     {  
         int a=98;
         switch(a)
         {
             default:{ System.out.println("default");break;}
             case 'b':{ System.out.println(a); break;}
             case 'a':{ System.out.println(a);}
          }
          System.out.println("Switch Completed");
     }
}
share|improve this answer

Because you have a continue outside of a loop. continue is for jumping back to the beginning of a loop, but you don't have any loop in that code. What you want for breaking out of a switch case block is the keyword break (see below).

There's also no need to put every case block within braces (unless you want locally-scoped variables within them).

So somethinga bit like this would be more standard:

class swi22
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int a=98;
        switch(a)
        {
            default:
                System.out.println("default");
                break;
            case 'b':
                System.out.println(a);
                break;
            case 'a':
                System.out.println(a);
                break;
        }
        System.out.println("Switch Completed");
    }
}

There's also a school of thought that says the default condition should always be at the end. This is not a requirement, just a fairly widely-used convention.

share|improve this answer

Shouldn't you use break instead of continue?

share|improve this answer

You are using continue where you should be using break

share|improve this answer

continue simply moves directly to the next iteration of the loop.

break is used to break out of loops and switches.

Use break; instead of continue;

Continue:

for(x = 0; x < 10; x++)
{
   if(x == 3)
     continue;
   else       
     DoIterativeWork();       
}

Switch:

switch(a)
{
 default:{ System.out.println("default"); break;}
 case 'b':{ System.out.println(a); break;}
 case 'a':{ System.out.println(a);}
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.