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public static MySingleton getInstance() {
 if (_instance==null) {
   synchronized (MySingleton.class) {
      _instance = new MySingleton();
   }
 }
 return _instance;
} 

1.is there a flaw with the above implementation of the getInstance method? 2.What is the difference between the two implementations.?

public static synchronized MySingleton getInstance() { 
 if (_instance==null) {
  _instance = new MySingleton();
 }

 return _instance;
} 

I have seen a lot of answers on the singleton pattern in stackoverflow but the question I have posted is to know mainly difference of 'synchronize' at method and block level in this particular case.

share|improve this question
    
    
There's an intrincate problem with a variation of your first code (a variation that double-check the nullity, first outside the synchronized and next inside the sync). It has to do with how the compiler and the JVM does things. If you are VERY interested you can look for "double checked initilization java problem". –  helios Mar 26 '10 at 9:01
    
You may be interested in this famous paper on "double-checked locking" which basically comes to the conclusion that it's broken: aristeia.com/Papers/DDJ_Jul_Aug_2004_revised.pdf –  Michael Aaron Safyan Mar 26 '10 at 9:19
    
You might also be interested in: cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html –  Michael Aaron Safyan Mar 26 '10 at 9:20
    
@Michael DCL is safe as of the Java 5 memory model, so long as you get it right. –  Pascal Thivent Sep 4 '10 at 3:05

6 Answers 6

up vote 22 down vote accepted

1.is there a flaw with the above implementation of the getInstance method?

It does not work. You can end up with several instances of your Singleton.

2.What is the difference between the two implementations.?

The second one works, but requires synchronization, which could slow down the system when you have a lot of accesses to the method from different threads.

The most straightforward correct implementation:

public class MySingleton{
    private static final MySingleton _instance = new MySingleton();
    private MySingleton(){}
    public static MySingleton getInstance() { 
        return _instance;
    }
}

Shorter and better (safely serializable):

public enum MySingleton{
    INSTANCE;

    // methods go here
}

Lazy initialization of singletons is a topic that gets attention way out of proportion with its actual practical usefulness (IMO arguing about the intricacies of double-checked locking, to which your example is the first step, is nothing but a pissing contest).

In 99% of all cases, you don't need lazy initialization at all, or the "init when class is first referred" of Java is good enough. In the remaining 1% of cases, this is the best solution:

public enum MySingleton{
    private MySingleton(){}
    private static class Holder {
         static final MySingleton instance = new MySingleton();
    }
    static MySingleton getInstance() { return Holder.instance; }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
enums aren't lazily-initialized, though –  skaffman Mar 26 '10 at 8:40
1  
Looks like you forgot both the type and the static keyword on the _instance member. Also, what's the purpose of synchronizing the getInstance method, if you're not doing a lazy-init? (Agreed that one rarely needs lazy init; but in those cases where one does...) –  T.J. Crowder Mar 26 '10 at 8:48
1  
@skaffman, @T.J.: got the enum approach confused with the holder class, corrected now –  Michael Borgwardt Mar 26 '10 at 8:53
1  
@Michael: That "best solution" involving the enum looks like serious enum abuse. –  T.J. Crowder Mar 26 '10 at 9:06
1  
@R.A.J: Hm, after checking some references, it looks like I was wrong when it comes to multithreaded code and there is actually special treatment for final variables that was introduced in 2004 with JSR 133. I'll add the final - and thanks for pointing it out. –  Michael Borgwardt Dec 20 '13 at 9:38

1.is there a flaw with the above implementation of the getInstance method?

Yes, the synchronized keyword should wrap the if statement as well. If it's not then two or more threads could potentially get through to the creation code.

2.What is the difference between the two implementations.?

The second implementation is correct and from my point of view easier to understand.

Using synchronized at the method level for a static method synchronizes on the class, i.e. what you've done in sample 1. Using synchronized at the method level for an instance method synchronizes on the object instance.

share|improve this answer
    
@OP: In this area, you'll find something called the "double-checked locking pattern". That's where you check, find the null, then synchronize, then check again (in case things have changed in the meantime), then create. It works in many languages, but does not work in Java unless you use a volatile field for the instance, which is 'way over the top. You're best off with your second implementation, especially with recent JVMs that handle entering syncrhonized blocks very efficiently indeed. More reading here: ibm.com/developerworks/library/j-jtp02244.html –  T.J. Crowder Mar 26 '10 at 8:46
    
@OP re my comment above, I should have been more clear: It works in many environments, but not the JVM (unless you use a volatile field or its equivalent -- if any -- in the language you're using). Clarifying because these days, Java is just one of many languages that compiles down to Java bytecode and runs on the JVM (and similarly -- though more rarely -- there are some Java compilers that compile to machine code and don't use a JVM). –  T.J. Crowder Mar 26 '10 at 9:02

The first is flawed in two ways. As others mentioned here, multiple threads could get through

if (_instance==null) {

They would wait for each other, until the object is completely constructed, but they would do the instantiation and replace the reference in the variable.

The second flaw is a little more complicated. One thread could get into the constructor new MySingleton() and then the JVM switches to another thread. Another thread may check the variable for null, but that may contain a reference to a partially constructed object. So the other thread works on the partially constructed Singleton, that's also not good. So the first variant should be avoided.

The second variant should work fine. Don't care too much about efficiency, until you identify this clearly as blocker. Modern JVMs can optimize away unneeded synchronizations, so in real production-code this construct may never hurt performance.

share|improve this answer

The various approaches to lazy-load singletons are discussed by Bob Lee in Lazy Loading Singletons and the "right" approach is the Initialization on Demand Holder (IODH) idiom which requires very little code and has zero synchronization overhead.

static class SingletonHolder {
  static Singleton instance = new Singleton();    
}

public static Singleton getInstance() {
  return SingletonHolder.instance;
}

Bob Lee also explain when he wants to lazy load a singleton (during tests and development). Honestly, I'm not convinced there is a huge benefit.

share|improve this answer

The second one is thread safe, but it has the overhead of synchronized on every call, no matter if the instance is constructed or not. The first option has one major flaw that it doesn't have a check for if (_instance == null) in the synchronized block to prevent creating two instances.

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I would suggest the following implementation

public class MySingleTon
{

  private static MySingleton obj;

  //private Constructor
  private MySingleTon()
  {
  }


  public static MySingleTon getInstance()
  {
     if(obj==null)
     {
        synchronized(MySingleTon.class)
        {
         if(obj == null)
         {
             obj = new MySingleTon();
         }
        }
     }
     return obj;    
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is still double-checked locking and therefore is still incorrect. –  matt b Mar 26 '10 at 11:06

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