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I am fairly new to Haskell and am working on an assignment simulating checkers currently. I am having a bit of difficulty determining the proper method of conditionally checking an expression and updating the values of a tuple. I have a function called getPos that will return the Char at a specific location on the board to determine its state.

    onemove :: (Int,[Char],[[Char]],(Int,Int)) -> (Int,[Char],[[Char]])

    onemove     (a,b,c,(d,e)) 
       | e <= 0 =(a-30,b,c)
       | e > 50 =(a-30,b,c)
       | (((posTo == 'r') || (posTo == 'i')) &&((posFrom == 'w')||(posFrom == 'k'))) == 'true'  =(a-20,b,c)
       | (((posTo == 'w')||(posTo == 'k')) && ((posFrom == 'r') || (posFrom == 'i')))== 'true' =(a-20,b,c)
       | otherwise = (1000,b,c)
       where posFrom = getPos (d, c)
             posTo =  getPos (e,c)

Is it correct to use a function to define a variable within my where clause? I receive the following error on my last line:

    parse error on input `='
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I don't even reach that point. I get a parse error on input `|' on the first guard (what you call 'conditional' is actually called a 'guard', 'guarded statement', or anything along those lines). Indentation matters in Haskell; all those pipe characters and the where need to move at least one column to the right. –  Rhymoid Aug 9 at 15:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your immediate problem is mostly just caused by indentation. Guards need to be indented w.r.t the definition they're associated with.

onemove :: (Int,[Char],[[Char]],(Int,Int)) -> (Int,[Char],[[Char]])
onemove     (a,b,c,(d,e)) 
  | e <= 0 =(a-30,b,c)
  | e > 50 =(a-30,b,c)
  | (((posTo == 'r') || (posTo == 'i')) &&((posFrom == 'w')||(posFrom == 'k'))) =(a-20,b,c)
  | (((posTo == 'w')||(posTo == 'k')) && ((posFrom == 'r') || (posFrom == 'i'))) =(a-20,b,c)
  | otherwise = (1000,b,c)
  where posFrom = getPos (d, c)
        posTo =  getPos (e,c)

Notice I also removed the == 'true' in your original code. That was wrong for three separate reasons.

  1. Single quotes denote a Char. Double quotes for String.
  2. You can't compare a Boolean value to a String just because that String happens to say "true". You would have to say == True.
  3. There's no reason to ever write bool == True, because that's exactly the same as just writing bool.

Also, a, b, c, and (d,e) should probably all be separate arguments, not a single tuple. You lose all the advantages of currying that way.

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1  
It seems that (a,b,c) together acts as some sort of environment, so they probably belong together. But OP should really consider using data for that. (I'm starting to think that even tuples may be harmful when learning Haskell.) –  Rhymoid Aug 9 at 15:34
    
I appreciate the help! I think the indentation problem came in as I was copying into stackOverflow. As @Rhymoid mentioned, the tuple is a set environment so I am unable to adjust the data structure. With the follow declaration for getPos: getPos :: Int -> [[Char]] -> Char, what is the cause of a Couldn't match expected type 'Int' error? Thanks guys –  Dev Aug 9 at 15:42
    
Well, as you just wrote, getPos expects and Int and a [[Char]] but you handed it an (Int,[[Char]]). You want getPos d c not getPos (d,c). –  Mark Whitfield Aug 9 at 15:46
    
That was my issue. Thanks mark! you've cleared up a few questions I've been scratching my head over. –  Dev Aug 9 at 16:00

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