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Given an object(=instance) that is used by multiple threads the following approach is the most common (as far as I know):

the shared resource:

class Resource():
    def return_some_value(self):
      return self.somevalue

global (or parent context):

lock = Lock()
res = Resource()

within an accessing thread:

lock.acquire()
res.return_some_value()
lock.release()

Obviously the accessing thread is responsible to lock and unlock the shared resource.

Lets presume the shared resource is more complex and some methods/properties are read-only while others are not. The Threads using the resource now have to know which is which and lock accordingly. That is obviously error-prone and I sometimes have trouble choosing where to put the Lock object.

Now my question: Is it possible to shift the responsibility to correctly lock to the shared resource itself? Does it even make sense? Something like:

class Resource():
    def __init__(self):
        self.lock = Lock()
    def return_some_value(self):
        self.lock.acquire()
        return self.somevalue
        self.lock.release() # obviously this won't work
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, doing that makes perfect sense. You can also use a Lock as a context manager to ensure it's always released:

class Resource():
    def __init__(self):
        self.lock = Lock()

    def return_some_value(self):
        with self.lock:  # Lock gets acquired
            return self.somevalue  # Lock gets released

The owner of a Lock is based on the thread that acquired it. So many different callers can call into your Resource object from different threads, and the lock will behave appropriately.

This wouldn't work well if you need to call multiple methods on Resource which require you to hang onto the lock the entire time. In that case, you may want to consider making the resource itself lockable:

class Resource():
    def __init__(self):
        self.lock = Lock()

    def __enter__(self):
        self.lock.acquire()

    def __exit__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.lock.release()

    def return_some_value(self):
        return self.somevalue

    def some_method(self):
        # stuff

    def some_other_method(self):
        # stuff

r = Resource()
with r:
    r.some_method()
    r.some_other_method()
    val = r.return_some_value()
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I was not sure if the lock would be released after the return statement. But apparently that is always the case with a with-statement (and also with try-finally). I did not know that. –  PeterE Aug 9 '14 at 16:08
    
@Peter Yep, as stated in the docs‌​: "When a return, break or continue statement is executed in the try suite of a try...finally statement, the finally clause is also executed ‘on the way out.’" –  dano Aug 9 '14 at 16:10
    
In regard to the second part of your answer: If the methods are independent from one an other, both variants would work equally well, wouldn't they? –  PeterE Aug 9 '14 at 16:12
    
Also: Do I have to lock read-only properties/methods? –  PeterE Aug 9 '14 at 16:13
    
@Peter I would say that if each method is independent, the first option is better, since the client doesn't need to worry about locking things at all. If a property/method is read-only for all threads, there's no need to lock them. The only exception to that is if the read-only method is using some resource that can't be shared (like a method that reads from a file object, or uses an iterator, that's stored in the instance, for example). Though I suppose you could argue that's not really "read-only". –  dano Aug 9 '14 at 16:18

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