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I'm doing an analysis where I would like to change the printing of data from horizontal to vertical. For instance, when I do the following, here is the type of output I currently see:

> with(mtcars,sapply(split(mpg,cyl),mean))
       4        6        8 
26.66364 19.74286 15.10000 

I would like the output to be organized like this:

4    26.66364
6    19.74286
8    15.10000

Is there a way to achieve this?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use stack,

> with(mtcars, stack(sapply(split(mpg, cyl), mean)))
#    values ind
#1 26.66364   4
#2 19.74286   6
#3 15.10000   8

But aggregate would probably be much nicer for this problem

> aggregate(mpg ~ cyl, mtcars, mean)
#  cyl      mpg
#1   4 26.66364
#2   6 19.74286
#3   8 15.10000

Also, tapply might be a better fit than sapply, if you go that route.

> stack(with(mtcars, tapply(mpg, cyl, mean)))
#    values ind
#1 26.66364   4
#2 19.74286   6
#3 15.10000   8

With sapply, you're going to get a vector if the return values are only on one row, so you may want to use a different function for the calculations.

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Try:

as.matrix( with(mtcars,sapply(split(mpg,cyl),mean)) )
  [,1]
4 26.7
6 19.7
8 15.1

By default matrix objects will be single column matrices. You could use:

as.data.frame( with(mtcars,sapply(split(mpg,cyl),mean)) )

But the name of the column will be ugly, IMO.

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That did the trick, except for the first row [,1], which I will tolerate. Thanks! –  PearsonArtPhoto Aug 9 '14 at 23:23
    
Another way to do this, with a bit less typing, is two transposes: t(t(...)). –  Hong Ooi Aug 10 '14 at 0:37
    
Too may upshifts for me. –  BondedDust Aug 10 '14 at 6:06

data.table can also be used for vertical output:

mtcarsdt = data.table(mtcars)

mtcarsdt[,mean(mpg),by=cyl]
   cyl       V1
1:   6 19.74286
2:   4 26.66364
3:   8 15.10000
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Some output functions have the option flip, e.g. stargazer (for summary statistics). That may help you, too.

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