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I am trying to build a little javascript class for geocoding addresses trough Google Maps API. I am learning Javascript and AJAX and I still can't figure out how can I initialize class variables trough a callback:

    // Here is the Location class, it takes an address and 
    // initialize a GClientGeocoder. this.coord[] is where we'll store lat/lng
    function Location(address) {
        this.geo = new GClientGeocoder();
        this.address = address;
        this.coord = [];                        
    }

    // This is the geoCode function, it geocodes object.address and 
    // need a callback to handle the response from Google
    Location.prototype.geoCode = function(geoCallback) { 
        this.geo.getLocations(this.address, geoCallback); 
    }

    // Here we go: the callback. 
    // I made it a member of the class so it would be able 
    // to handle class variable like coord[]. Obviously it don't work.
    Location.prototype.geoCallback = function(result) {
        this.coord[0] = result.Placemark[0].Point.coordinates[1];
        this.coord[1] = result.Placemark[0].Point.coordinates[0];
        window.alert("Callback lat: " + this.coord[0] + "; lon: " + this.coord[1]);
    }

    // Main
    function initialize() {
        var Place =  new Location("Tokyo, Japan");
        Place.geoCode(Place.geoCallback);
        window.alert("Main lat: " + Place.coord[0] + " lon: " + Place.coord[1]);
    }

    google.setOnLoadCallback(initialize);

Thank you for helping me out!

EDIT

Thanks TJ for your reply. I read your example and your post — things are getting much clearer. But I still have an issue. Have a look:

function bind(context, func) {
    return function() {
        return func.apply(context, arguments);
    }
}
function Location(address) {
    this.geo = new GClientGeocoder();
    this.address = address;
    this.coord = [];                        
}

Location.prototype.geoCode = function(callback) { 
    this.geo.getLocations(this.address, callback); 
}

Location.prototype.geoCallback = function(result) {
    this.coord[0] = result.Placemark[0].Point.coordinates[1];
    this.coord[1] = result.Placemark[0].Point.coordinates[0];
    // This alert is working properly, printing the right coordinates
    window.alert("I am in geoCallback() lat: " + this.coord[0] + "; lon: " + this.coord[1]);
}

function initialize() {
    var Place =  new Location("Tokyo, Japan");
    Place.geoCode(bind(Place, Place.geoCallback));
    window.alert("I am in initialize() lat: " + Place.coord[0] + "; lon: " + Place.coord[1]);
}

Why the alert in initialize() pops before the alert in geoCallback(), printing an undefined/undefined?

share|improve this question
    
The alert in initialize() pops before the alert in geoCallback() because getLocations is asynchronous (AJAX stands for Asynchronous Javascript...). –  Alsciende Mar 26 '10 at 13:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you need to do is ensure that this is set correctly in the callback. This is sometimes called "binding". Prototype provides Function#bind for this, but it's easy enough to do if you don't use Prototype — define a function that will do the binding for you:

function bind(context, func) {
    return function() {
        return func.apply(context, arguments);
    }
}

and then use it in your initialize call:

function initialize() {
    var Place =  new Location("Tokyo, Japan");
    Place.geoCode(bind(Place, Place.geoCallback)); // <= Change is here
    window.alert("Main lat: " + Place.coord[0] + " lon: " + Place.coord[1]);
}

(Although I think I'd suggest refactoring a bit so that the caller of geoCode doesn't have to provide the callback at that level.)

What bind above does is create a closure (a function) that, when called, will turn around and call the function you gave with this set to the context you gave, passing on any arguments that were given. (This is done above via Function#apply, which is a standard part of JavaScript.) You'd normally want to define bind at a fairly high level (page level or within your scoping function if you use one [which is a good idea]) to avoid having the generated functions closing over more data than necessary.

Here's a post in my anemic blog about this in a bit more detail.


Regarding your edit: That's actually a completely different question. By default, Ajax calls are asynchronous (which is why Google wants you to provide a callback function). So your code requests the data via getLocations, but that request is processed asynchronously and your code continues. The very next thing your code does is display the values you don't have yet. At some later time, the request will complete and the values will be updated, but by then your code has finished. You'd want to move the alert (more generically, move your code processing the result) into a callback.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your clarifyng reply and link! But I still have an issue with AJAX, I edited the question. –  Gianluca Mar 26 '10 at 13:40
    
@Gianluca: Your edited question is actually a completely different question, it would probably be better to ask a separate question than to edit this one. –  T.J. Crowder Mar 26 '10 at 13:47
    
@Gianluca: ...but I went ahead and posted the answer to that into the above as well. –  T.J. Crowder Mar 26 '10 at 13:54

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