Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm building my project with maven so according to maven way, config should be in src/main/conf , how can I say to my spring application context that that is where jdbc.properties is found? Here is example bean :

<bean id="propertyConfigurer" class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
<property name="location" value="jdbc.properties" />
</bean>

Spring assumens that this configuration is inside src/main/webapp/WEB-INF, I hope I've been clear if not I'll rephrase my question thank you

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm building my project with maven so according to maven way, config should be in src/main/conf

Actually, configuration data should generally go in src/main/resources, that way it will be on the classpath and you can reference your property file like:

<property name="location" value="classpath:jdbc.properties" />
share|improve this answer
    
@Kevin actually configuration should be in src/main/config and resources should be in src/main/resources javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-12-2005/jw-1205-maven.html?page=1 –  ant Mar 26 '10 at 15:05
    
@c0mrade arguably configuration files like these are "resources" –  matt b Mar 26 '10 at 15:22
    
@matt b yes arguably, you say it should go to resources I think it should go into config, after all resources are probably already full of something –  ant Mar 26 '10 at 15:32
    
This doesn't work as well .. not if I even put the properties file in src/main/resources .. –  Gandalf StormCrow Mar 26 '10 at 15:46
    
Kevin's answer is exactly what my set-up is for multiple projects. I have a runtime.properties file in src/main/resources and a propertyConfigurer bean. The only difference is that mine uses the 'locations' property: <bean id="propertyConfigurer" class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer"> <property name="locations"> <list> <value>classpath:runtime.properties</value> </list> </property> </bean> –  elduff Mar 26 '10 at 15:54
add comment

I think it is not quite clear as to what a "config file" means. I am thinking it is the config files used by the other maven plugins (such as surefire plugins, assembly plugins etc).

Surely in the 10+ web app projects that I have worked the bean files, jdbc.properties files have all been under src/main/resources

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this

<bean id="propertyConfigurer" class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
<property name="location" value="src/main/config/jdbc.properties" />
</bean>
share|improve this answer
    
This only works if the final, built project puts jdbc.properties under src/main/config (which would be unlikely and irregular) –  matt b Mar 26 '10 at 15:21
    
@matt b what about this article? javaworld.com/javaworld/jw-12-2005/jw-1205-maven.html?page=1 –  ant Mar 26 '10 at 15:27
    
This doesn't work .. –  Gandalf StormCrow Mar 26 '10 at 15:46
    
@c0mrade, what about that article? You are correct that the stated convention is for "configuration files" to go in src/main/config. What I am referring to is the fact that when you package the application, the config files are not packaged in a folder named src/main/config in the packaged file (jar/war/etc.). Therefore your answer only works when you run the application within the source code, or when src/main/config is in the classpath (which it is not by default). The correct prefix is to use classpath: or another location. –  matt b Mar 26 '10 at 17:05
    
Also if you want to refer people to what the convention is, better to refer to maven.apache.org/guides/introduction/… than a javaworld article from 2005. –  matt b Mar 26 '10 at 17:08
show 3 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.