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I'm working on a Node.js app. This app will be hosted as a Web Site in Windows Azure. My code is hosted as a GIT respository in Visual Studio Online. I authorized my Windows Azure to deploy from Visual Studio Online.

When I check code into my repository, I was expecting a deployment to occur. However, I'm not seeing any deployments. When I visit the deployments tab in the Azure portal, I see a screen that says:

The team project is linked.
Visual Studio Online will build and deploy your project to Windows Azure on your next check-in.

However, I check code in, but I never get a deployment. The code successfully runs on my local machine. Is there somewhere I can see the log files? If so, where? At this point, I don't know if there are errors or if I'm doing something wrong. I just know that my code isn't deploying to Azure.

Thank you!

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Did you remember to push your commit to Visual Studio Online (VSO)? If so, go to the build page for your application in VSO and see if it is still queued. If there was an error, you will be able to see the logs there too. –  Rick Rainey Aug 11 at 15:22
    
I believe this is due to VSO looking for a sln file. Have you been developing your application with the node tools within Visual Studio? –  SyntaxC4 Aug 12 at 16:43
    
No. I've been developing in Sublime. Just want to deploy to Azure. –  xam developer Aug 12 at 18:12
    
Does VSO require a .sln file? –  xam developer Aug 13 at 12:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Have you updated your Azure website configuration in the portal?

take a look here for some steps how to set it up http://www.hanselman.com/blog/MovingAWebsiteToAzureWhileAddingContinuousDeploymentFromGit.aspx

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