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Trying to understand this one line of code:

int solution_mask |= 1 << (1+ solution.charAt(i) - 'A');

lets say that solution.charAt(i) is 122. So 122-65 = 57.

1+ 57 = 58

How does 1 get shifted 58 bits to the left in solution_mask, i.e. how does solution_mask variable store the value 58?

Here's the complete code for context:

 public static int[][] find(String guess, String soln) {

 int[][] res={0,0};
 int solution_mask = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 4; ++i) {
 solution_mask |= 1 << (1 + solution.charAt(i) - ‘A’);
 }
 for (int i = 0; i < 4; ++i) {
 if (guess.charAt(i) == solution.charAt(i)) {
 res[0]++;
 } else if ((solution_mask &
 (1 << (1 + guess.charAt(i) - ‘A’))) >= 1) {
 res[1]++;
 }
 }
 return res;
 }
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1  
Perhaps solution is expected to contain only upper case letters. –  Eran Aug 11 at 14:23
2  
Your line of code doesn't compile. –  mikea Aug 11 at 14:24
1  
@mikea Presumably the line was solution_mask |= 1 << (1+ solution.charAt(i) - 'A'); and the OP added the int to indicate the type, not realising it would be invalid. –  Duncan Aug 11 at 14:30
    
folks, i meant to indicate the type of solution_mask, this line clearly isn't meant to compile. you would have to set up other things for it like String solution,etc. –  stretchr Aug 12 at 0:12

2 Answers 2

In Java shifts are modded by 32 (or 64, for longs) before they're applied.

See this answer

That means 1 << 58 is equivalent to 1 << (58 % 32) which is 1 << 26

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, just a minor correction, acc to to the code I am putting it at position 27 (1+58)%32...i.e. (59%32). I'm wondering if I can just do away with the '1+..'. It does not seem to be needed. –  stretchr Aug 12 at 0:35

Assuming the code should be something like:

int solution_mask = 0;
...
for ( int i = 0; i < solution.length(); i++ ) {
  solution_mask |= 1 << (1+ solution.charAt(i) - 'A');
}

Then this is setting one bit in the solution_mask for each character in the solution string. The result will therefor be a bit pattern indicating which characters are present in the solution.

E.G. If the solution string is "ABDF" the solution_mask will be (in binary) 1010110.

If solution contains any characetrs beyond A..Z[\]^_ and strange things will happen because an int is only 32bits wide.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought the same as you too but then I tried running for string YRGZ and RGGz, still got the correct answer. –  stretchr Aug 12 at 0:20

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