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I'm puzzled by some behaviour I'm seeing when copying a float array member into another variable - please help!

For example

data_entry[1] = 9.6850069951

new_value = data_entry[1]


<comment> #print both

9.6850069951


9.6850663300

I'm aware of the problem of binary storage of floats but I thought with a direct copy of memory we would end up with the same value.

Any ideas? I need better precision than this! thanks in advance Stuart

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For me the values are the same. Mac OS X, Python 2.6.1 –  Tuomas Pelkonen Mar 26 '10 at 16:43
3  
Cannot reproduce the problem here. Both values print as exactly the same (10 values after decimal point). I'm using python 2.6.4 under windows XP (not that I like using that OS) –  Morlock Mar 26 '10 at 16:46
    
Can you post a complete program we can run that reproduces this problem? (Your assumption that mere assignment will not change the value is correct. In fact, it will leave them being the same exact float object.) –  Mike Graham Mar 26 '10 at 17:12
2  
It's possible that "float array member" in the question means exactly that: i.e., something like array.array('f') rather than a Python list (or perhaps a numpy float array?). This could explain the different numbers. But 9.6850663300 still doesn't look right: the closest IEEE single precision value to this is around 9.6850662231445312. It's very difficult to tell what's wrong without seeing the real code. –  Mark Dickinson Mar 26 '10 at 17:32
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5 Answers

After an assignment the variable new_value is not a copy of the float, it's just another reference to the exact same object. Therefore it cannot possibly have a different printed representation. So there's definitely some detail omitted in the original question.

Stuart - can you please try the following and post the result, or tell us how your actual code varies. Note below that new_value is data_entry[1] i.e. they are both the same object.

>> data_entry = [0,0]
>> data_entry[1] = 9.6850069951
>> new_value = data_entry[1]
>> new_value is data_entry[1]
True
>> print data_entry[1], new_value
9.6850069951 9.6850069951
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If you're really using the array module (or numpy's arrays) the precision loss is easy to explain, e.g.:

>>> dataentry = array.array('f', [9.6850069951])
>>> dataentry[0]
9.6850070953369141

here, the 'f' first arg to array.array says we're using 32-bit floats, so only about 7 significant digits "survive". But it's easy to use 64-bit floats (once upon a time those were known as "double precision"!-):

>>> dataentry = array.array('d', [9.6850069951])
>>> dataentry[0]
9.6850069951000002

As you see, this way more than a dozen significant digits "survive" (you can typically rely on about 14+, unless you do arithmetic "oops"s such as taking the difference of numbers very close to each other, which of course devours your precision;-).

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Thanks to all for your comments and advice. Using Alex's suggestion, I seem to have solved the problem by using and array.array('d',x) expression so it seems original float array did not have enough precision. I'll posted some more code in the next comment as there's no space here. –  SJA Apr 8 '10 at 9:29
    
old_code: data = [] for data_entry in data: if (data_entry[1] != 0): value = data_entry[1] modlog(logging.INFO,'raw value = %.12f',data_entry[1]) modlog(logging.INFO,'value_in = %.12f', value) output: :INFO:raw value = 2.334650748292 :INFO:value_in = 2.334685585881 new code: data = array.array('d') if (data[index] != 0): test_data = data[index] modlog(logging.INFO,'raw data = %.12f', data[(index)]) modlog(logging.INFO,'test_data = %.12f', test_data) output: :INFO:raw data = 2.333840588874 :INFO:test_data= 2.333840588874 –  SJA Apr 8 '10 at 9:32
    
@SJA, code in comments is totally unreadable. Please edit your question instead, to add the code in question, so it can be properly formatted as code. –  Alex Martelli Apr 8 '10 at 14:21
    
I noticed the problem and replied to my own question 2 posts below so I could format the code. I'll know the next time to just edit the original question. –  SJA Apr 8 '10 at 15:08
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Didn't work for me with Python 2.6.2 on Linux:

>>> data_entry = [1, 2]
>>> data_entry[1] = 9.6850069951
>>> new_value = data_entry[1]
>>> print data_entry[1]
--> print(data_entry[1])
9.6850069951
>>> print new_value
--> print(new_value)
9.6850069951

One option would be to switch to using Decimal objects:

>>> from decimal import Decimal
>>> data_entry[1] = Decimal('9.6850069951')
>>> new_value = data_entry[1]
>>> print data_entry[1]
--> print(data_entry[1])
9.6850069951
>>> print new_value
--> print(new_value)
9.6850069951

If you're losing precision somehow this might help.

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@samtregar How would the use of the 'decimal' module affect memory use? (considering I use very large lists or arrays?) –  Morlock Mar 26 '10 at 16:50
2  
@Morlock, using decimal.Decimal is more memory intensive and much slower than using float. For the class of problems float is good for (representing things like physical measurements), it is almost always the right choice. decimal.Decimal's main use is representing money and performing calculations involving money with the right precision and rounding rules. Like float, it has representation and roundoff errors, though the precision can be modified to be extremely high. I have yet to see real software where Decimal was chosen over float because the latter was not precise enough. –  Mike Graham Mar 26 '10 at 16:59
    
@samtregar Thanks, very clear. –  Morlock Mar 26 '10 at 17:18
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You've left some code out.

>>> data_entry=[0,0]
>>> data_entry[1] = 9.6850069951
>>> 
>>> new_value = data_entry[1]
>>> print data_entry
[0, 9.6850069951000002]
>>> print new_value
9.6850069951
>>> print data_entry[1]
9.6850069951

The repr and the str of this floating-point number are producing different results. My guess is that the code you posted omitted mentioning this difference.

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Here's some edited code formatted:

old code:
data = []
for data_entry in data:
    if (data_entry[1] != 0):
    value = data_entry[1]
    modlog(logging.INFO,'raw value = %.12f',data_entry[1])
    modlog(logging.INFO,'value_in = %.12f', value)
output:
:INFO:raw value = 2.334650748292
:INFO:value_in  = 2.334685585881

new code:
data = array.array('d') 
if (data[index] != 0):
    test_data = data[index]
    modlog(logging.INFO,'raw data = %.12f', data[(index)])
    modlog(logging.INFO,'test_data = %.12f', test_data)
output:
:INFO:raw data = 2.333840588874
:INFO:test_data= 2.333840588874
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