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I'm using async/await to make multiple requests per second to a service using their API. The problem I am running into is when I need to refresh the token (it expries every hour). After the token has expired, I get a 401 unauthorized error back from the service. That's when I refresh the token, and retry the failed request again. The token gets refreshed fine, but what I'm finding is that even after the token is refreshed, a lot of subsequent requests are still sent with the old token. Following are the methods that are used in this functionality. Wondering if anything standouts as being the culprit for this unintended behavior.

public void Process(id)
{
    var tasks = items.Select(async item =>
    {
        var response = await SendRequestAsync(() => CreateRequest(item.Url));
        //do something with response
        await Process(item.subId); //recursive call to process sub items.
    }).ToList();

    if (tasks.Any())
        await Task.WhenAll(tasks);      

}

public HttpRequestMessage CreateRequest(string url)
{
    var request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Get, url);
    request.Headers.Add("Authorization", "Bearer " + AppSettings.AccessToken); 
    return request;
}

public async Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendRequestAsync(Func<HttpRequestMessage> funcReq)
{   
    var response = await ExecuteRequestAsync(funcReq());

    while (response.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.Unauthorized)
    {
        await RefreshTokenAsync();
        return await ExecuteRequestAsync(funcReq());  //assuming func ensures that CreateRequest is called each time, so I'll always have a new request with the updated token.
    }  

    return response;            
}

private async Task<HttpResponseMessage> ExecuteRequestAsync(HttpRequestMessage request)
{
    var client = new HttpClient();
    var response = await client.SendAsync(request);
    return response;    
}

public async Task RefreshTokenAsync()
{
    await semaphoreSlim.WaitAsync();
    try
    {      
        if ((DateTime.Now - refreshTime).TotalMinutes < 60) //tokens last for an hour, so after the refresh is made by the first request that failed, subsequent requests should have the latest token.
            return; 

        Token newToken = GetNewToken();
        AppSettings.AccessToken = newToken.AccessToken //AppSettings is a singleton wrapper class for app.cofig app settings
        refreshTime = DateTime.Now
    }
    finally
    {
        semaphoreSlim.Release();
    }
}
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1  
How much longer are requests being executed with the same token? Have you eliminated the possibility that those are requests which were in progress/started before the token was refreshed? –  Marcel N. Aug 11 '14 at 19:53
    
@MarcelN. At first I get a bunch of 401 errors--that's expected. But my semaphore should ensure that only the first failed request will refresh the token. The remaining ones should then have the updated token by the time they are sent out. Though some requests do go out with the new token, a lot of requests are still going out with the old one. Some retry requests are going with the old token for more than an hour after the refresh. –  Prabhu Aug 11 '14 at 20:21
    
How long do your requests take? It sounds very reasonable to assume what @MarcelN said about previous requests not finishing execution. Also, how are you initalizing your SemaphoreSlim? –  Yuval Itzchakov Aug 11 '14 at 20:22
    
I don't think that's entirely true. Some requests may already be at this point var response = await ExecuteRequestAsync(funcReq());, after funcReq evaluated, when the token gets refreshed. By this time it's too late for them to get the new token. They will get executed with the old one. –  Marcel N. Aug 11 '14 at 20:23
2  
@Prabhu: I'm not sure about better, but you could not wait for a 401 to refresh the token. Instead, refresh it every 60 minutes and serialize access only when regenerating. This implies that in CreateRequest you won't use AppSettings.AccessToken anymore, but a getter which does the job. This way you can be positive you always have the latest token. The downside is if the API changes the interval you'll have to adjust. –  Marcel N. Aug 11 '14 at 20:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is not an answer. It's just I don't have where to post the code discussed in one of the comments.

Prabhu, I think something like this should work in order to have the token updated prior to getting a 401. This works only if you can make an assumption on how often tokens expire.

public HttpRequestMessage CreateRequest(string url)
{
    var request = new HttpRequestMessage(HttpMethod.Get, url);
    request.Headers.Add("Authorization", "Bearer " + GetUpToDateAccessToken()); 
    return request;
}

private Token GetUpToDateAccessToken()
{
    _readWriteLockSlim.EnterReadLock();
    try
    {      
        return _latestToken;
    }
    finally
    {
        _readWriteLockSlim.ExitReadLock();
    }  
}

Updating the token can be done with a Timer every 60 minutes. Synchronization is done with a read-write lock. This would be the Timer's tick handler (you can use a System.Timers.Timer).

private void UpdateToken()
{  
  _readWriteLockSlim.EnterWriteLock();
  try 
  {
     if ((DateTime.Now - refreshTime).TotalMinutes >= 60) 
     {
         Token newToken = GetNewToken();
         _latestToken = newToken.AccessToken;
          refreshTime = DateTime.Now;
     }
  }
  finally
  {
    _readWriteLockSlim.ExitWriteLock();
  }
}

As you mentioned, if the 60 minute expiry period is not guaranteed then this won't work as expected. Maybe you can re-generate the token every 5 minutes or so, to make sure you don't make requests with invalid tokens.

Finally, to handle 401s because they can still occur, you can modify the while loop in SendRequestAsync to:

if (response.StatusCode == HttpStatusCode.Unauthorized)
{
   UpdateToken();
   return await ExecuteRequestAsync(funcReq());
}
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@YuvalItzchakov: Thanks for the edit, but I was just adding a _readWriteLockSlim.EnterWriteLock(); where the blank line was :). –  Marcel N. Aug 11 '14 at 21:16
    
LOL, Sorry about that :) –  Yuval Itzchakov Aug 11 '14 at 21:18
1  
@Prabhu: If you do get a 401 then I guess you could call UpdateToken which enters a critical section anyway. But the weird "race condition" can still occur, less often though, if two or more requests are started before one 401s. –  Marcel N. Aug 11 '14 at 21:21
1  
@Prabhu: Check update. –  Marcel N. Aug 11 '14 at 21:23
1  
@Prabhu: The only thing that crosses my mind now is this condition if ((DateTime.Now - refreshTime).TotalMinutes < 60). If the server rejects the requests AND the difference is less than 60 minutes then requests will still use the old token. It's the only way. –  Marcel N. Aug 11 '14 at 22:09

I will suggest the following workflow (added to the currently suggested from Marcel N) (pseudo code) :

// Manage the expiration token yourself in the Application or Db
var token = GetTokenFromDbOrApplicationWithExpirationDateTime()
// Expiration on your application can be a little bit less than real, so instead of 60 can be 50 minutes.
if (token.isExpired)
    token = RequestNewToken()
    Db.SaveChanges(token);
}

CallMethod1Async(token)
CallMethod2Async(token)
CallMethod3Async(token)

you also may want to check if the CallMethodAsync returns a response with invalid token as Marcel N provided.

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