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How can I calculate the number of work days between two dates in SQL Server?

Monday to Friday and it must be T-SQL.

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5  
Can you define workdays? any Monday through friday? Excluding major holidays? What country? Must it be done in SQL? –  Dave K Oct 31 '08 at 3:29

14 Answers 14

up vote 117 down vote accepted

For workdays, Monday to Friday, you can do it with a single SELECT, like this:

DECLARE @StartDate DATETIME
DECLARE @EndDate DATETIME
SET @StartDate = '2008/10/01'
SET @EndDate = '2008/10/31'


SELECT
   (DATEDIFF(dd, @StartDate, @EndDate) + 1)
  -(DATEDIFF(wk, @StartDate, @EndDate) * 2)
  -(CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, @StartDate) = 'Sunday' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)
  -(CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, @EndDate) = 'Saturday' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)

If you want to include holidays, you have to work it out a bit...

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3  
nice answer +1 :) –  almog.ori Apr 18 '10 at 13:11
1  
I just realized that this code doesn't work always! i tried this: SET @StartDate = '28-mar-2011' SET @EndDate = '29-mar-2011' the answer it counted it as 2 days –  greektreat Mar 30 '11 at 14:33
5  
@greektreat It works fine. It's just that both @StartDate and @EndDate are included in the count. If you want Monday to Tuesday to count as 1 day, just remove the "+ 1" after the first DATEDIFF. Then you'll also get Fri->Sat=0, Fri->Sun=0, Fri->Mon=1. –  Joe Daley Apr 4 '11 at 1:11
1  
As a followup to @JoeDaley. When you remove the + 1 after the DATEDIFF to exclude the startdate from the count you also need to adjust the CASE part of this. I ended up using this: +(CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, @StartDate) = 'Saturday' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) - (CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, @EndDate) = 'Saturday' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) –  Sequenzia Feb 15 '12 at 18:45
3  
The datename function is locale-dependent. A more robust but also more obscure solution is to replace the last two lines by: -(case datepart(dw, @StartDate)+@@datefirst when 8 then 1 else 0 end) -(case datepart(dw, @EndDate)+@@datefirst when 7 then 1 when 14 then 1 else 0 end) –  Torben Klein Aug 20 '12 at 9:09

In Calculating Work Days you can find a good article about this subject, but as you can see it is not that advanced.

--Changing current database to the Master database allows function to be shared by everyone.
USE MASTER
GO
--If the function already exists, drop it.
IF EXISTS
(
    SELECT *
    FROM dbo.SYSOBJECTS
    WHERE ID = OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo].[fn_WorkDays]')
    AND XType IN (N'FN', N'IF', N'TF')
)
DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[fn_WorkDays]
GO
 CREATE FUNCTION dbo.fn_WorkDays
--Presets
--Define the input parameters (OK if reversed by mistake).
(
    @StartDate DATETIME,
    @EndDate   DATETIME = NULL --@EndDate replaced by @StartDate when DEFAULTed
)

--Define the output data type.
RETURNS INT

AS
--Calculate the RETURN of the function.
BEGIN
    --Declare local variables
    --Temporarily holds @EndDate during date reversal.
    DECLARE @Swap DATETIME

    --If the Start Date is null, return a NULL and exit.
    IF @StartDate IS NULL
        RETURN NULL

    --If the End Date is null, populate with Start Date value so will have two dates (required by DATEDIFF below).
     IF @EndDate IS NULL
        SELECT @EndDate = @StartDate

    --Strip the time element from both dates (just to be safe) by converting to whole days and back to a date.
    --Usually faster than CONVERT.
    --0 is a date (01/01/1900 00:00:00.000)
     SELECT @StartDate = DATEADD(dd,DATEDIFF(dd,0,@StartDate), 0),
            @EndDate   = DATEADD(dd,DATEDIFF(dd,0,@EndDate)  , 0)

    --If the inputs are in the wrong order, reverse them.
     IF @StartDate > @EndDate
        SELECT @Swap      = @EndDate,
               @EndDate   = @StartDate,
               @StartDate = @Swap

    --Calculate and return the number of workdays using the input parameters.
    --This is the meat of the function.
    --This is really just one formula with a couple of parts that are listed on separate lines for documentation purposes.
     RETURN (
        SELECT
        --Start with total number of days including weekends
        (DATEDIFF(dd,@StartDate, @EndDate)+1)
        --Subtact 2 days for each full weekend
        -(DATEDIFF(wk,@StartDate, @EndDate)*2)
        --If StartDate is a Sunday, Subtract 1
        -(CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, @StartDate) = 'Sunday'
            THEN 1
            ELSE 0
        END)
        --If EndDate is a Saturday, Subtract 1
        -(CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, @EndDate) = 'Saturday'
            THEN 1
            ELSE 0
        END)
        )
    END
GO

If you need to use a custom calendar, you might need to add some checks and some parameters. Hopefully it will provide a good starting point.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for including the link to understand how this works. The write on sqlservercentral was great! –  Chris Porter Feb 26 '13 at 22:36
    
Thanks for the inline comments. They helped me to quickly see how this works. –  unnknown Apr 9 at 17:31

All Credit to Bogdan Maxim & Peter Mortensen. This is their post, I just added holidays to the function (This assumes you have a table "tblHolidays" with a datetime field "HolDate".

--Changing current database to the Master database allows function to be shared by everyone.
USE MASTER
GO
--If the function already exists, drop it.
IF EXISTS
(
    SELECT *
    FROM dbo.SYSOBJECTS
    WHERE ID = OBJECT_ID(N'[dbo].[fn_WorkDays]')
    AND XType IN (N'FN', N'IF', N'TF')
)

DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[fn_WorkDays]
GO
 CREATE FUNCTION dbo.fn_WorkDays
--Presets
--Define the input parameters (OK if reversed by mistake).
(
    @StartDate DATETIME,
    @EndDate   DATETIME = NULL --@EndDate replaced by @StartDate when DEFAULTed
)

--Define the output data type.
RETURNS INT

AS
--Calculate the RETURN of the function.
BEGIN
    --Declare local variables
    --Temporarily holds @EndDate during date reversal.
    DECLARE @Swap DATETIME

    --If the Start Date is null, return a NULL and exit.
    IF @StartDate IS NULL
        RETURN NULL

    --If the End Date is null, populate with Start Date value so will have two dates (required by DATEDIFF below).
    IF @EndDate IS NULL
        SELECT @EndDate = @StartDate

    --Strip the time element from both dates (just to be safe) by converting to whole days and back to a date.
    --Usually faster than CONVERT.
    --0 is a date (01/01/1900 00:00:00.000)
    SELECT @StartDate = DATEADD(dd,DATEDIFF(dd,0,@StartDate), 0),
            @EndDate   = DATEADD(dd,DATEDIFF(dd,0,@EndDate)  , 0)

    --If the inputs are in the wrong order, reverse them.
    IF @StartDate > @EndDate
        SELECT @Swap      = @EndDate,
               @EndDate   = @StartDate,
               @StartDate = @Swap

    --Calculate and return the number of workdays using the input parameters.
    --This is the meat of the function.
    --This is really just one formula with a couple of parts that are listed on separate lines for documentation purposes.
    RETURN (
        SELECT
        --Start with total number of days including weekends
        (DATEDIFF(dd,@StartDate, @EndDate)+1)
        --Subtact 2 days for each full weekend
        -(DATEDIFF(wk,@StartDate, @EndDate)*2)
        --If StartDate is a Sunday, Subtract 1
        -(CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, @StartDate) = 'Sunday'
            THEN 1
            ELSE 0
        END)
        --If EndDate is a Saturday, Subtract 1
        -(CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, @EndDate) = 'Saturday'
            THEN 1
            ELSE 0
        END)
        --Subtract all holidays
        -(Select Count(*) from [DB04\DB04].[Gateway].[dbo].[tblHolidays]
          where  [HolDate] between @StartDate and @EndDate )
        )
    END  
GO
-- Test Script
/*
declare @EndDate datetime= dateadd(m,2,getdate())
print @EndDate
select  [Master].[dbo].[fn_WorkDays] (getdate(), @EndDate)
*/
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Dan B. Just to let you know that your version assumes that table tblHolidays do not contain Saturdays and Mondays, which, sometimes happens. Anyway, thanks for sharing your version. Cheers –  Julio Nobre Nov 25 '13 at 11:42
    
Julio - Yes - My version does assume that Saturday's and Sundays (not Monday's) are weekends, and therefor not "non-business" day. But if you're working weekends, then I guess everyday is a "workday" and you can comment out the Saturday & Sunday part of the clause and just add in all your holidays to the tblHolidays table. –  Dan B Dec 5 '13 at 17:20

(I'm a few points shy of commenting privileges)

If you decide to forgo the +1 day in CMS's elegant solution, note that if your start date and end date are in the same weekend, you get a negative answer. Ie., 2008/10/26 to 2008/10/26 returns -1.

my rather simplistic solution:

select @Result = (..CMS's answer..)
if  (@Result < 0)
        select @Result = 0
    RETURN @Result

.. which also sets all erroneous posts with start date after end date to zero. Something you may or may not be looking for.

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 DECLARE @TotalDays INT,@WorkDays INT
 DECLARE @ReducedDayswithEndDate INT
 DECLARE @WeekPart INT
 DECLARE @DatePart INT

 SET @TotalDays= DATEDIFF(day, @StartDate, @EndDate) +1
 SELECT @ReducedDayswithEndDate = CASE DATENAME(weekday, @EndDate)
  WHEN 'Saturday' THEN 1
  WHEN 'Sunday' THEN 2
  ELSE 0 END 
 SET @TotalDays=@TotalDays-@ReducedDayswithEndDate
 SET @WeekPart=@TotalDays/7;
 SET @DatePart=@TotalDays%7;
 SET @WorkDays=(@WeekPart*5)+@DatePart

 RETURN @WorkDays
share|improve this answer
    
If you post code, XML or data samples, please highlight those lines in the text editor and click on the "code samples" button ( { } ) on the editor toolbar to nicely format and syntax highlight it! –  marc_s Jan 20 '11 at 11:30
    
This one is actually very good --- thanks! –  Dylon Edwards Mar 28 '11 at 20:16
    
Great, no need for periphery functions or updates to the database using this. Thanks. Love the saltire btw :-) –  Brian Scott Dec 15 '11 at 11:35

My version of the accepted answer as a function using DATEPART, so I don't have to do a string comparison on the line with

DATENAME(dw, @StartDate) = 'Sunday'

Anyway, here's my business datediff function SET ANSI_NULLS ON GO SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON GO

CREATE FUNCTION BDATEDIFF
(
    @startdate as DATETIME,
    @enddate as DATETIME
)
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @res int

SET @res = (DATEDIFF(dd, @startdate, @enddate) + 1)
    -(DATEDIFF(wk, @startdate, @enddate) * 2)
    -(CASE WHEN DATEPART(dw, @startdate) = 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)
    -(CASE WHEN DATEPART(dw, @enddate) = 7 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)

    RETURN @res
END
GO
share|improve this answer

For difference between dates including holidays I went this way:

1) Table with Holidays:

    CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Holiday](
[Id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[Name] [nvarchar](50) NULL,
[Date] [datetime] NOT NULL)

2) I had my plannings Table like this and wanted to fill column Work_Days which was empty:

    CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Plan_Phase](
[Id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[Id_Plan] [int] NOT NULL,
[Id_Phase] [int] NOT NULL,
[Start_Date] [datetime] NULL,
[End_Date] [datetime] NULL,
[Work_Days] [int] NULL)

3) So in order to get "Work_Days" to later fill in my column just had to:

SELECT Start_Date, End_Date,
 (DATEDIFF(dd, Start_Date, End_Date) + 1)
-(DATEDIFF(wk, Start_Date, End_Date) * 2)
-(SELECT COUNT(*) From Holiday Where Date  >= Start_Date AND Date <= End_Date)
-(CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, Start_Date) = 'Sunday' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)
-(CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, End_Date) = 'Saturday' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)
-(CASE WHEN (SELECT COUNT(*) From Holiday Where Start_Date  = Date) > 0 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)
-(CASE WHEN (SELECT COUNT(*) From Holiday Where End_Date  = Date) > 0 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS Work_Days
from Plan_Phase

Hope that I could help.

Cheers

share|improve this answer
    
Concerning your holidays subtractions. What if start date is January 1 and end date is December 31? You will subtract only 2 - which is wrong. I propose to use DATEDIFF(day, Start_Date, Date) and same for End_Date instead of whole 'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Holiday ...'. –  Illia Ratkevych Mar 22 '13 at 16:06

Here is a version that works well (I think). Holiday table contains Holiday_date columns that contains holidays your company observe.

DECLARE @RAWDAYS INT

   SELECT @RAWDAYS =  DATEDIFF(day, @StartDate, @EndDate )--+1
                    -( 2 * DATEDIFF( week, @StartDate, @EndDate ) )
                    + CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, @StartDate) = 'Saturday' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
                    - CASE WHEN DATENAME(dw, @EndDate) = 'Saturday' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END 

   SELECT  @RAWDAYS - COUNT(*) 
     FROM HOLIDAY NumberOfBusinessDays
    WHERE [Holiday_Date] BETWEEN @StartDate+1 AND @EndDate 
share|improve this answer
DECLARE @StartDate datetime,@EndDate datetime

select @StartDate='3/2/2010', @EndDate='3/7/2010'

DECLARE @TotalDays INT,@WorkDays INT

DECLARE @ReducedDayswithEndDate INT

DECLARE @WeekPart INT

DECLARE @DatePart INT

SET @TotalDays= DATEDIFF(day, @StartDate, @EndDate) +1

SELECT @ReducedDayswithEndDate = CASE DATENAME(weekday, @EndDate)
    WHEN 'Saturday' THEN 1
    WHEN 'Sunday' THEN 2
    ELSE 0 END

SET @TotalDays=@TotalDays-@ReducedDayswithEndDate

SET @WeekPart=@TotalDays/7;

SET @DatePart=@TotalDays%7;

SET @WorkDays=(@WeekPart*5)+@DatePart

SELECT @WorkDays
share|improve this answer
    
If you post code, XML or data samples, please highlight those lines in the text editor and click on the "code samples" button ( { } ) on the editor toolbar to nicely format and syntax highlight it! –  marc_s Jan 20 '11 at 11:30
CREATE FUNCTION x
(
    @StartDate DATETIME,
    @EndDate DATETIME
)
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @Teller INT

    SET @StartDate = DATEADD(dd,1,@StartDate)

    SET @Teller = 0
    IF DATEDIFF(dd,@StartDate,@EndDate) <= 0
    BEGIN
        SET @Teller = 0 
    END
    ELSE
    BEGIN
        WHILE
            DATEDIFF(dd,@StartDate,@EndDate) >= 0
        BEGIN
            IF DATEPART(dw,@StartDate) < 6
            BEGIN
                SET @Teller = @Teller + 1
            END
            SET @StartDate = DATEADD(dd,1,@StartDate)
        END
    END
    RETURN @Teller
END
share|improve this answer
1  
It'd be better if you explained the code you posted. –  Alex Oct 29 '12 at 0:17

I took the various examples here, but in my particular situation we have a @PromisedDate for delivery and a @ReceivedDate for the actual receipt of the item. When an item was received before the "PromisedDate" the calculations were not totaling correctly unless I ordered the dates passed into the function by calendar order. Not wanting to check the dates every time, I changed the function to handle this for me.

Create FUNCTION [dbo].[fnGetBusinessDays]
(
 @PromiseDate date,
 @ReceivedDate date
)
RETURNS integer
AS
BEGIN
 DECLARE @days integer

 SELECT @days = 
    Case when @PromiseDate > @ReceivedDate Then
        DATEDIFF(d,@PromiseDate,@ReceivedDate) + 
        ABS(DATEDIFF(wk,@PromiseDate,@ReceivedDate)) * 2 +
        CASE 
            WHEN DATENAME(dw, @PromiseDate) <> 'Saturday' AND DATENAME(dw, @ReceivedDate) = 'Saturday' THEN 1 
            WHEN DATENAME(dw, @PromiseDate) = 'Saturday' AND DATENAME(dw, @ReceivedDate) <> 'Saturday' THEN -1 
            ELSE 0
        END +
        (Select COUNT(*) FROM CompanyHolidays 
            WHERE HolidayDate BETWEEN @ReceivedDate AND @PromiseDate 
            AND DATENAME(dw, HolidayDate) <> 'Saturday' AND DATENAME(dw, HolidayDate) <> 'Sunday')
    Else
        DATEDIFF(d,@PromiseDate,@ReceivedDate)  -
        ABS(DATEDIFF(wk,@PromiseDate,@ReceivedDate)) * 2  -
            CASE 
                WHEN DATENAME(dw, @PromiseDate) <> 'Saturday' AND DATENAME(dw, @ReceivedDate) = 'Saturday' THEN 1 
                WHEN DATENAME(dw, @PromiseDate) = 'Saturday' AND DATENAME(dw, @ReceivedDate) <> 'Saturday' THEN -1 
                ELSE 0
            END -
        (Select COUNT(*) FROM CompanyHolidays 
            WHERE HolidayDate BETWEEN @PromiseDate and @ReceivedDate 
            AND DATENAME(dw, HolidayDate) <> 'Saturday' AND DATENAME(dw, HolidayDate) <> 'Sunday')
    End


 RETURN (@days)

END
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If you need to add work days to a given date, you can create a function that depends on a calendar table, described below:

CREATE TABLE Calendar
(
  dt SMALLDATETIME PRIMARY KEY, 
  IsWorkDay BIT
);

--fill the rows with normal days, weekends and holidays.


create function AddWorkingDays (@initialDate smalldatetime, @numberOfDays int)
    returns smalldatetime as 

    begin
        declare @result smalldatetime
        set @result = 
        (
            select t.dt from
            (
                select dt, ROW_NUMBER() over (order by dt) as daysAhead from calendar 
                where dt > @initialDate
                and IsWorkDay = 1
                ) t
            where t.daysAhead = @numberOfDays
        )

        return @result
    end
share|improve this answer

Using a date table:

    DECLARE 
        @StartDate date = '2014-01-01',
        @EndDate date = '2014-01-31'; 
    SELECT 
        COUNT(*) As NumberOfWeekDays
    FROM dbo.Calendar
    WHERE CalendarDate BETWEEN @StartDate AND @EndDate
      AND IsWorkDay = 1;

If you don't have that, you can use a numbers table:

    DECLARE 
    @StartDate datetime = '2014-01-01',
    @EndDate datetime = '2014-01-31'; 
    SELECT 
    SUM(CASE WHEN DATEPART(dw, DATEADD(dd, Number-1, @StartDate)) BETWEEN 2 AND 6 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) As NumberOfWeekDays
    FROM dbo.Numbers
    WHERE Number <= DATEDIFF(dd, @StartDate, @EndDate) + 1 -- Number table starts at 1, we want a 0 base

They should both be fast and it takes out the ambiguity/complexity. The first option is the best but if you don't have a calendar table you can allways create a numbers table with a CTE.

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That's working for me, in my country on Saturday and Sunday are non-working days.

For me is important the time of @StartDate and @EndDate.

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[fnGetCountWorkingBusinessDays]
(
    @StartDate as DATETIME,
    @EndDate as DATETIME
)
RETURNS INT
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE @res int

SET @StartDate = CASE 
    WHEN DATENAME(dw, @StartDate) = 'Saturday' THEN DATEADD(dd, 2, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, @StartDate))
    WHEN DATENAME(dw, @StartDate) = 'Sunday' THEN DATEADD(dd, 1, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, @StartDate))
    ELSE @StartDate END

SET @EndDate = CASE 
    WHEN DATENAME(dw, @EndDate) = 'Saturday' THEN DATEADD(dd, 0, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, @EndDate))
    WHEN DATENAME(dw, @EndDate) = 'Sunday' THEN DATEADD(dd, -1, DATEDIFF(dd, 0, @EndDate))
    ELSE @EndDate END


SET @res =
    (DATEDIFF(hour, @StartDate, @EndDate) / 24)
  - (DATEDIFF(wk, @StartDate, @EndDate) * 2)

SET @res = CASE WHEN @res < 0 THEN 0 ELSE @res END

    RETURN @res
END

GO
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