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Case 1) instantiate the 'C', 'a' times.

void foo (int a) {
 if (a==0) return;
 Car C;
 C.memberfunc(a);
 ...
 foo(a-1);
}

Case 2) instantiate the 'C' once, and uses its member function in the recursive foo

Car C;
void foo (int a) {
 if (a==0) return;
 C.memberfunc(a);
 ...
 foo(a-1);
}

UPDATE: There is no state here. So, according to Difference between declaring variables before or in loop? Case 1) should be better. But the answers imply that Case 2) is the better option.

Can you tell me which approach is better and why? Thanks!

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Captain Obvlious, Lightness Races in Orbit, Deduplicator, RA., Walter Aug 12 at 12:20

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I vote for the second. Creates less stack load. –  40two Aug 11 at 23:32
    
"Better" by which criteria? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 11 at 23:33
3  
That rather depends on what Car is, and what memberfunc does. The two pieces of code are not equivalent if Car carries state. And if it doesn't carry state, then creating and destroying it is a no-op (and memberfunc should probably be static in any case). –  Igor Tandetnik Aug 11 at 23:33
    
Thanks for the answers. So, if there is no state, they are equivalent? How come they are no-op? the memberfunc is not static –  Computer_guy Aug 11 at 23:38
1  
@Computer_guy: If the compiler can elide the object ("as-if rule"), there will obviously not be any overhead for it. –  Deduplicator Aug 12 at 0:22

1 Answer 1

Firstly, the question is whether both approaches are appropriate. Are they? If object C maintains a state that can to be different from one level of recursion to another then only the first approach is available to you. In the second approach, each nested recursive call will destroy the state created in C by the previous call, which is, of course, unacceptable. For example, forward pass of the recursion might store same data in C and expect that data to remain available and unchanged at the same level of recursion during the backtracking stage.

Secondly, if both approaches are indeed available to you, i.e. if C does not have any state that is specific to each level of recursion, then, of course, the second approach is better. However, using a global object is still not a good idea. The proper implementation of the second approach would create C before (and outside) the recursion and made sure all nested recursive calls have access to the same C object. Object C can still be a local object owned by the calling code. A reference to it is simply passed to the recursive calls through function arguments.

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Thanks for the complete answer! I just wonder why it is different from this example stackoverflow.com/questions/407255 The compiler should be smart enough! and according to the answer of that post, case 1) should be better! –  Computer_guy Aug 12 at 11:19

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