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I am trying to define a function inside a type family which is polymorphic over a phantom type of a GADT itself defined within the type family.

My type family definition is along the lines of:

class Channel t where
    data Elem t a :: * 
    foo :: t -> Elem t a
    bar :: Elem t a -> [a]

I have an instance as follows:

data MyChannelType = Ch

instance Channel MyChannelType where

    data Elem MyChannelType a where
        MyConstructor :: Char -> Elem MyChannelType Char

    foo _ = MyConstructor 'a'

    bar (MyConstructor c) = repeat c

The compiler complains that:

Couldn't match type ‘a’ with ‘Char’
      ‘a’ is a rigid type variable bound by
          the type signature for foo :: MyChannelType -> Elem MyChannelType a

Is it possible to write this function with Rank2Types or to reformulate my data types to enable it?


EDIT : In response to the clarification Ganesh requested

I would want foo (bar Ch) :: [Int] to be illegal.

I have been using exactly the solution Ganesh suggests but I am motivated by the following more complicated example, where it falls down; given:

data MyOtherType = IntCh | StringCh

I have an instance as follows:

instance Channel MyOtherType where

    data Elem MyOtherType a where
        ElemInt    :: Int ->    Elem MyOtherType Int
        ElemString :: String -> Elem MyOtherType String

    foo IntCh    = ElemInt 0
    foo StringCh = ElemString "a"

    bar (ElemInt i)    = repeat i
    bar (ElemString s) = repeat s

Many thanks,

Michael

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3  
This is unimplementable with your current signatures. To help understand the options for reformulating it, what would you expect bar (foo Ch) :: [Int] to produce? –  Ganesh Sittampalam Aug 12 '14 at 5:15
    
or alternatively, would you want to make it illegal? –  Ganesh Sittampalam Aug 12 '14 at 5:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

With the signatures you've given, foo is unimplementable for MyChannelType because it claims to be able to produce Elem MyChannelType a for any a type.

If what you really want is that there should only be one a type for a given t, you can use a type function to express this:

class Channel t where
    data Elem t a :: *
    type Contents t :: *

    foo :: t -> Elem t (Contents t)
    bar :: Elem t a -> [a]

and then add

type Contents MyChannelType = Char

to the instance.

In response to your edit, I would break up Channel into two classes:

class Channel t where
    data Elem t a :: *
    bar :: Elem t a -> [a]

class Channel t => ChannelContents t a where
    foo :: t -> Elem t a

You can then define the MyOtherType instances with:

instance Channel MyOtherType where

    data Elem MyOtherType a where
        ElemInt :: Int -> Elem MyOtherType Int
        ElemString :: String -> Elem MyOtherType String

    bar (ElemInt i) = repeat i
    bar (ElemString s) = repeat s

instance ChannelContents MyOtherType Int where
    foo IntCh = ElemInt 0

instance ChannelContents MyOtherType String where
    foo StringCh = ElemString "a"

You'll need to enable a few extensions: MultiParamTypeClasses, TypeSynonymInstances, FlexibleInstances (the latter two only because of the String instance).

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Hi Ganesh. Thank you for this - I'm slightly proud that this is exactly what I have been doing to this point! However, I have a more complex instance for which this falls down - I have added the details to the original question. I am aware that this probably needs rethinking any would appreciate any suggestions for reformulation. Regards, Michael –  Michael Thomas Aug 12 '14 at 10:14

As a more general alternative to Ganesh's solution, you can also constrain the a variable to a whole class of types (possibly just a single one):

{-# LANGUAGE ConstraintKinds #-}
import GHC.Exts (Constraint)

class Channel t where
    data Elem t a :: *
    type ElemConstraint t a :: Constraint
    foo :: ElemConstraint t a => t -> Elem t a
    bar :: ElemConstraint t a => Elem t a -> [a]

instance Channel MyChannelType where
    data Elem MyChannelType a where
        MyConstructor :: Char -> Elem MyChannelType Char
    type ElemConstraint t a = a ~ Char
    foo _ = MyConstructor 'a'
    bar (MyConstructor c) = repeat c


class OtherType_Class c where
  mkOtherTypeElem :: c -> Elem MyOtherType c
  evOtherTypeElem :: Elem MyOtherType c -> c

instance OtherType_Class Int where
  mkOtherTypeElem = ElemInt
  evOtherTypeElem (ElemInt i) = i
instance OtherType_Class String where
  ...

instance Channel MyOtherType where
    data Elem MyOtherType a where
        ElemInt    :: Int ->    Elem MyOtherType Int
        ElemString :: String -> Elem MyOtherType String
    type ElemConstraint MyOtherType a = OtherType_Class a

However, I should say that this is a rather awkward thing to do for just some fixed collection of types.

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Interesting - I didn't even realize this was possible to express. Is this equivalent to the second solution Ganesh proposes? –  Michael Thomas Aug 12 '14 at 12:24
    
Basically equivalent, but it would look a bit different in actual code to be used. I quite like ConstraintKinds, they work rather nicer for a single-type constraint as in MyChannelType and can (but won't necessarily) give somewhat nicer signatures than with MultiParamTypeClasses. For cases like MyOtherType, Ganesh's solution is better because it doesn't require such an awkward throw-away OtherType_Class. –  leftaroundabout Aug 12 '14 at 12:32

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