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Suppose we have two gradients with the following conditions:

  • Except for their alpha parameters, the gradients are identical.
  • One gradient is directly above the other, and they are perfectly registered.
  • The background gradient is fully opaque.
  • The foreground gradient varies in transparency.

Is it reasonable to assume that when two such gradients are blended by the browser, the foreground gradient will not have a noticeable impact on the composite output?

To test my assertion, I devised the following test (available as a Fiddle) using HTML and CSS:

<body>
<style>
div.bg {
    width: 254px;
    height: 254px;
    background-image: linear-gradient(
        to right, 
        rgba(255, 255, 255, 1.0)   0%, 
        rgba(255,   0,   0, 1.0) 100%
    );
    border: 1px solid #808080;
}
div.fg {
    height: 127px;
    background-image: linear-gradient(
        to right, 
        rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.0)   0%, /* If these alpha values are identical   */
        rgba(255,   0,   0, 1.0) 100%  /* (regardless of value), the phenomenon */
    );                                 /* disappears!                           */
}
</style>
<div class=bg>
    <div class=fg></div>
</div>
</body>

In Firefox (F), my assertion was confirmed. In Chrome (C), it was not. These screenshots show the results:

(F) Firefox result (C) Chrome result

Note the presence of a seam in Chrome's output. For Chrome, this only happens when the foreground gradient's beginning and ending alpha values are unequal. When they are equal, Chrome produces the same output as Firefox -- regardless of the actual alpha value used!

Can you determine what is going here? Which browser is right? Is there a specification supporting either of these behaviors, or is the alpha blending algorithm entirely up to the browser vendors?

share|improve this question
1  
IE behaves the same as Chrome. –  BoltClock Aug 12 at 4:36
    
Yeah, I noticed that too. What are the odds that two independent browsers would have the same unusual behavior? Does this implicate Firefox? –  Sharky Aug 12 at 5:40
    
Maybe. I don't usually see IE siding with Chrome with what turns out to be the correct behavior (although it does happen sometimes). I'm not all that familiar with alpha composition and such though :( –  BoltClock Aug 12 at 5:42
    
The images you've shown are consistent with those obtained when using Inkscape and overlaying a square with a gradient with another, smaller, square with the same gradient. This furthers my opinion that the answer to: Is it reasonable to assume that when two such gradients are blended by the browser, the foreground gradient will not have a noticeable impact on the composite output? is no. Similarly, looking through two semi-opaque objects in real-life presents you with an image that represents a blending of the two - not just one or the other. E.g tinted car-windows. –  enhzflep Aug 12 at 6:11
    
I don't know anything about Inkscape, but I can imagine there are a number of different blending modes a renderer could possibly use. However, we still don't have a good explanation for why the result is always the same (and the seam disappears) when the foreground gradient's beginning and ending alphas are equal, and yet the output is so different when they are not. –  Sharky Aug 12 at 7:14

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