Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my implementation of async/await but I'm not sure if I'm doing it correctly.

Code works as intended but I would like someone to review this small pice of code to point out any errors.

public class DbUtils
{

    public static List<string> GetDataSources()
    {
        //I have removed some logic from here as it's not important to my question
        List<string> names = new List<string>();
        names = SomeClass.SomeLongSystemMethod();
        return names;
    }

    public static async Task<List<string>> GetDataSourcesAsync()
    {
        //This is a place where I have my doubts
        return await Task.Run(() =>
        {
            return GetDataSources();
        });
    }
}

public class SomeOtherClass
{
    private async void BT_RefreshServerName_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        CB_ServerName.DataSource = await DbUtils.GetDataSourcesAsync();
    }
}

EDIT:

My new version of code looks like this.

public class SomeOtherClass
{
    private async void BT_RefreshServerName_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            try
            {
                BT_RefreshServerName.Enabled = false;

                //.ConfigureAwait(true) (this is a default) is to attempt to
                //marshal the continuation back to the original context as the
                //result is used to update UI.                    
                CB_ServerName.DataSource = await Task.Run(
                 () => DbUtils.GetDataSources()).ConfigureAwait(true);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, "Exception", MessageBoxButtons.OK);
            }
            finally
            {
                BT_RefreshServerName.Enabled = true;
            }
        }
    }
}

public class DbUtils
{

    public static List<string> GetDataSources()
    {
        //Some logic

        List<string> names = new List<string>();
        names = SomeClass.SomeLongSystemMethod();
        return names;
    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Remus Rusanu, Iain Galloway, Patrick Hofman, I3arnon, Sayse Aug 12 at 7:44

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
This question appears to be off-topic because it belongs to codereview.stackexchange.com –  Remus Rusanu Aug 12 at 7:31
    
@RemusRusanu I did not know that there is a separate section. Thanks for information. Next time I'll use codereview part. –  Rafał.S Aug 12 at 7:42
1  
If you don't do anything after the task has been awaited you can simply return the task. This will help to optimise your code as it doesn't need to create proxy tasks. So GetDataSourcesAsync can be changed to return Task.FromResult(GetDataSources()); and then remove the async modifier on the function –  JLevett Aug 12 at 7:42
    
@JLevett Thanks! That's exactly the kind of answer I was looking for. Cheers –  Rafał.S Aug 12 at 7:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That implementation of GetDataSourcesAsync is known as "async over sync", and is generally considered an anti-pattern (although to be fair, it is not as bad as "sync over async"). It will work, at least, but if you don't actually have genuine async operations down the chain, there isn't really any difference here to using a worker thread (generally the thread-pool), followed by Invoke / BeginInvoke to get back the the UI thread (to do the UI update).

It will work, if that is the question.

Now, if GetDataSourcesAsync actually used the *Async data access methods; then it would be great code. You wouldn't need Task.Run in that event, btw.

Also: add some exception handling to your event-handler.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm aware that I could have used thread-pool. I try to get rid of additional code I used to write to handle UI actions when I was using .NET 3.5. As you have suggested I'll abandon using this anti-pattern. Could you please look at my edit in the question and review the new version? I have tried to use as little code as possible in this question so no exception handling here ;) –  Rafał.S Aug 12 at 9:00
    
@Rafał.S I'm really not sure that the edit is consistent with my advice... My advice was to not use "async over sync", which you are still doing. My advice was also to use the async data access APIs, which you are not doing. –  Marc Gravell Aug 12 at 9:26
    
after more reading (this and other articles) about this topic I see why how I have missed your point. However I'm still confused about "(.. )use the async data access APIs, which you are not doing." in this situation. I understand "async data access API" as .Wait()/ConfigureAwait() etc methods but I think I'm just overwhelmed with this topic since I have switched to .NET 4.5 just today. I have changed code in my edit to match my current implementation which works as intended and I think is now much better code. –  Rafał.S Aug 12 at 15:14
1  
@Rafał.S no, .Wait() and .ConfigureAwait() aren't by themself async; there are simply continuation APIs. To be fully async, it would ideally use the async API down to the bottom - for example, SqlCommand.ExecuteNonQueryAsync / SqlCommand.ExecuteReaderAsync etc –  Marc Gravell Aug 12 at 15:25

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.