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Ignoring unsafe code, .NET cannot have memory leaks. I've read this endlessly from many experts and I believe it. However, I do not understand why this is so.

It is my understanding that the framework itself is written in C++ and C++ is susceptible to memory leaks.

  • Is the underlying framework so well-written, that it absolutely does not have any possibility of internal memory leaks?
  • Is there something within the framework's code that self-manages and even cures its own would-be memory leaks?
  • Is the answer something else that I haven't considered?
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9  
Please post a link to any "experts" saying that it is impossible for .NET frameworks (or any framework in any language) to have memory leaks. I need to write that person an e-mail. –  Shaggy Frog Aug 3 '10 at 15:45
    
@Shaggy Frog: see answers below. It's not that the .NET Framework is flawless or can't leak. The answer to the question relies on the distinction between the classic memory allocation/deallocation done within the framework's source code vs. the memory management done by the framework with regard to handing references. This is probably too simplistic of a summary, but there are many wonderful and more complete explanations below. –  Dinah Aug 3 '10 at 16:30
    
I'm merely reading your question as it is currently stated: "Ignoring unsafe code, .NET cannot have memory leaks. I've read this endlessly from many experts and I believe it." Frameworks have bugs that get fixed, which is why the get updated. Again, I'll say that I'm interested in reading some of these "expert" opinions, so please post links to such. –  Shaggy Frog Aug 3 '10 at 20:29

16 Answers 16

up vote 43 down vote accepted

There are already some good answers here, but I want to address one additional point. Let's look very carefully again at your specific question:


It is my understanding that the framework itself is written in C++ and C++ is susceptible to memory leaks.

  • Is the underlying framework so well-written, that it absolutely does not have any possibility of internal memory leaks?
  • Is there something within the framework's code that self-manages and even cures its own would-be memory leaks?
  • Is the answer something else that I haven't considered?

The key here is to distinguish between your code and their code. The .Net framework (and Java, Go, python, and other garbage-collected languages) promise that if you rely on their code, your code will not leak memory... at least in the traditional sense. You might find yourself in situations where some objects are not freed as you expect, but these cases are subtly different from traditional memory leaks because the objects are still reachable in your program.

You are confused because you correctly understand that this is not the same thing as saying any program you create can't possibly have a traditional memory leak at all. There could still be a bug in their code that leaks memory.

So now you have to ask yourself: would you rather trust your code, or their code? Keep in mind here that their code is not only tested by the original developers (just like yours, right?), it's also battle-hardened from daily use by thousands (perhaps millions) of other programmers like yourself. Any significant memory leak issues would be among the first things identified and corrected. Again, I'm not saying it's not possible. It's just that it's generally a better idea to trust their code than it is your own... at least in this respect.

Therefore the correct answer here is that it's a variant of your first suggestion:

Is the underlying framework so well-written, that it absolutely does not have any possibility of internal memory leaks?

It's not that there's no possibility, but that it's much safer than managing it yourself. I'm certainly not aware of any known leaks in the framework.

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2  
Eric Lippert should read this whole question (hoping for a vanity search win here). –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 27 '10 at 3:56
    
Just to add to that: their code indeed has memory leaks (WPF has quite a few leaks, one example: connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/529736/…). Not trying to bash (I like .net :)), just to give an example. –  Michael Stum Mar 27 '10 at 3:59
    
@Michael: Well there is their code and then there is their code. That is there is stuff like the WPF ProgressBar and there is stuff like the String type. The WPF ProgressBar has as much chance of containing the odd bug or two as our code, however the base .NET code on which we all rely ( them and us ) is much less likely to have such bugs. –  AnthonyWJones Mar 27 '10 at 21:13
    
Thank you. You cleared up my confusion by making the distinction of my code vs. their code. If, when I run my managed code, there is evidence of a memory and I find that the leak is occurring in a faulty part of the Framework, then my code is still not considered to be leaking. It is the Framework that is leaking. If my code were to run on a non-faulty version of the Framework, there would be no leak. Therefore, even with a memory leak present, my managed code still does not contain a memory leak. That was the contradiction I couldn't reconcile before. –  Dinah Mar 31 '10 at 19:32

.NET can have memory leaks.

Mostly, people refer to the Garbage Collector, which decides when an object (or whole object cycle) can be gotten rid of. This avoids the classic c and c++ style memory leaks, by which I mean allocating memory and not freeing it later on.

However, many times programmers do not realize that objects still have dangling references and do not get garbage collected, causing a... memory leak.

This is normally the case when events are registered (with +=) but not unregistered later on, but also when accessing unmanaged code (using pInvokes or objects that use underlying system resources, such as the filesystem or database connections) and not disposing properly of the resources.

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For example: Forgetting to dispose of an OS widget. –  Powerlord Mar 26 '10 at 19:21
40  
GC is much more complicated than just reference counting, but other than that yes. The memory leak in C/C++ is "something that is not freed but no longer referenced". Memory leak in Java/.NET is "something that we are still referencing but shouldn't be". Of course the .NET type of leaks can still happen in C/C++, so there is somewhat less chances to have a memory leak in .NET, but still very much a possibility. –  MK. Mar 26 '10 at 19:24
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Reference counting is rarely used in high performance virtual machines. The overhead is enormous and killing for multithreaded applications. –  Dykam Mar 26 '10 at 19:28
    
+1 I liked the example of events. –  Fuex Aug 13 '12 at 17:34

After reviewing Microsoft documentation, specifically "Identifying Memory Leaks in the CLR", Microsoft does make the statement that as long as you are not implementing unsafe code within your application that it is not possible to have a memory leak

Now, they also point out the concept of a perceived memory leak, or as was pointed out in the comments a "resource leak", which is the use of an object that has lingering references and is not disposed of properly. This can happen with IO Objects, DataSets, GUI elements, and the like. They are what I would typically equate to a "memory leak" when working with .NET, but they are not leaks in the traditional sense.

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Certain .NET classes, such as the ones you mentioned, wrap Windows kernel objects (such as file handles), so letting them drop out of scope without calling Dispose delays the release of the underlying resource until GC eventually gets around to it. This sort of error can leave files locked and inaccessible, so it's really bad, but it's not a genuine memory leak. –  Steven Sudit Mar 26 '10 at 21:01
    
@Steven Yes to a certain point...but in reality it is a leak, as how do you fix it. I guess it depends on your definition of a "leak" –  Mitchel Sellers Mar 26 '10 at 21:05
    
Maybe I'm being picky, but my notion of a leak is that a resource is lost permanently (or at least until the process shuts down). The event error is a genuine leak, while this example is just an undesirable slowness. Again, it may be a fine point, and I'd certainly fix such a problem immediately. –  Steven Sudit Mar 26 '10 at 21:16
    
@Steven - depending on usage, it could be lost until the process shuts down, I see this all the time with Files, XMLSerializers, and other objects in code. –  Mitchel Sellers Mar 26 '10 at 21:22
    
Handles are resources, and failing to release (dispose) them leads to resource leaks, but that is not commonly called a memory leak. –  Aaronaught Mar 26 '10 at 21:22

Due to garbage collection, you can't have regular memory leaks (aside from special cases such as unsafe code and P/Invoke). However, you can certainly unintentionally keep a reference alive forever, which effectively leaks memory.

edit

The best example I've seen so far of a genuine leak is the event handler += mistake.

edit

See below for an explanation of the mistake, and of the conditions under which it qualifies as a genuine leak as opposed to an almost-genuine leak.

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Could you explain "the event handler += mistake"? Excuse my ignorance :) –  Pwninstein Mar 27 '10 at 3:41
    
@Pwninstein. If you attacht an event handler with MyClass.CoolEvent += new EventHandler(HandleCoolEvent); This essentially adds an eventhandler to an internal list. And if you want to avoid memory leaks, you should detach in the same way but replace += with -=. This removes the event handler from the internal list. –  Henri Mar 27 '10 at 8:39
    
To add to that, if you don't remove the event (or the object itself, or both, i don't recall at the moment) will live forever, or at least till the end of your program. –  RCIX Mar 27 '10 at 10:46
    
I'd say it's only a "true" leak if you don't have delegate anymore, so you can't -= it even if you want. This can happen immediately if you use an anonymous method, or later if you lose all references to the class instance (but it's still stuck in memory, of course). –  Steven Sudit Mar 28 '10 at 22:58
1  
I would say that based on the definition of a "true leak" that is popular in this thread, the += doesn't qualify. That is because the class that holds the event can, at any time, say MyEvent = null thus removing the reference and allowing the GC to free the memory. That is to say, the reference itself is still available, though only to that one class. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Mar 29 '10 at 14:56

Here's an example of a memory leak in .NET, which doesn't involve unsafe/pinvoke and doesn't even involve event handlers.

Suppose you're writing a background service that receives a series of messages over a network and processes them. So you create a class to hold them.

class Message 
{
  public Message(int id, string text) { MessageId = id; Text = text; }
  public int MessageId { get; private set; }
  public string Text { get; private set; }
}

OK, so far so good. Later on you realize that some requirement in the system could sure be made easier if you had a reference to the previous message available when you do the processing. There could be any number of reasons for wanting this.

So you add a new property...

class Message
{
  ...
  public Message PreviousMessage { get; private set; }
  ...
}

And you write the code to set it. And, of course, somewhere in the main loop you have to have a variable to keep up with the last message:

  Message lastMessageReceived;

Then you discover some days later than your service has bombed, because it has filled up all the available memory with a long chain of obsolete messages.

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This isn't so much a leak as bad design. It's doing exactly what was asked: keeping all previous messages in memory. There's no way it could know which messages are ok to drop. –  Steven Sudit Mar 26 '10 at 21:07
1  
@Steven Sudit - When does the computer ever not do exactly what it was asked? Memory leaks are caused by bad design or buggy implementation. You could call this hypothetical situation a bug or a bad design, but, either way, the intent wasn't to fill up the memory with useless objects. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Mar 26 '10 at 21:15
1  
Admittedly, I'm being picky. I would consider it a leak only if it wasn't completely obvious that it will increase memory usage indefinitely. The code you showed has the same symptom as a bad leak -- memory usage grows until a crash -- but it's got a different cause. Forgetting to unlink an event handler, however, is subtle. –  Steven Sudit Mar 26 '10 at 21:31
1  
Let me clarify what I said. In C, if you malloc a buffer and lose all references to it, that's a leak because there's nothing your code can do at this point to recover that lost memory. In the sample above, the code can just "leak" the top reference to the chain and GC will deallocate all of it. It is the possibility of clean-up that prevents me from accepting something as a genuine leak. –  Steven Sudit Mar 26 '10 at 21:44
    
It is a leak, but it's not a traditional leak. .Net precludes traditional leaks, but there are still many way to create a non-traditional leak. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 27 '10 at 3:49

Here are other memory leaks that this guy found using ANTS .NET Profiler: http://www.simple-talk.com/dotnet/.net-tools/tracing-memory-leaks-in-.net-applications-with-ants-profiler/

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Interesting link. ANTS helped me confirm that SMO was leaking, so I'd likewise recommend it. –  Steven Sudit Mar 31 '10 at 16:59
    
+1 At my last job we used this profiler to find a memory leak in a 3rd party dll we were using. In that case, it happened to be a leak in the dll's unsafe code and not managed code, but it was still quite useful in helping us find the leak we'd suspected. –  Dinah Mar 31 '10 at 18:19

I suppose it is possible to write software, e.g. the .NET runtime environment (the CLR), that does not leak memory if one is careful enough. But since Microsoft does issue updates to the .NET framework via Windows Update from time to time, I'm fairly sure that there are occasional bugs even in the CLR.

All software can leak memory.

But as others have already pointed out, there are other kinds of memory leaks. While the garbage collector takes care of "classic" memory leaks, there's still, for example, the problem of freeing so-called unmanaged resources (such as database connections, open files, GUI elements, etc.). That's where the IDisposable interface comes in.

Also, I've recently come across with a possible leaking of memory in a .NET-COM interop setting. COM components use reference counts to decide when they can be freed. .NET adds yet another reference counting mechanism to this which can be influenced via the static System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal class.

After all, you still need to be careful about resource management, even in a .NET program.

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Objects that implement IDisposable almost always implement finalizers, so the underlying resource is eventually cleaned up by the GC, though not necessarily in a timely manner. –  Steven Sudit Mar 26 '10 at 21:02
    
Not always. Some root themselves, and will not be cleaned up until the AppDomain is shut down. –  kyoryu Mar 27 '10 at 3:01
    
@kyor: That's interesting. Could you point me to an example of a self-rooting object of the sort you mean? –  Steven Sudit Mar 29 '10 at 16:30

You can absolutely have memory leaks in .NET code. Some objects will, in some cases, root themselves (though these are typically IDisposable). Failing to call Dispose() on an object in this case will absolutely cause a real, C/C++ style memory leak with an allocated object that you have no way to reference.

In some cases, certain timer classes can have this behavior, as one example.

Any case where you have an asynchronous operation that may reschedule itself, you have a potential leak. The async op will typically root the callback object, preventing a collection. During execution, the object is rooted by the executing thread, and then the newly-scheduled operation re-roots the object.

Here's some sample code using System.Threading.Timer.

public class Test
{
    static public int Main(string[] args)
    {
        MakeFoo();
        GC.Collect();
        GC.Collect();
        GC.Collect();
        System.Console.ReadKey();
        return 0;
    }

    private static void MakeFoo()
    {
        Leaker l = new Leaker();
    }
}

internal class Leaker
{
    private Timer t;
    public Leaker()
    {
        t = new Timer(callback);
        t.Change(1000, 0);
    }

    private void callback(object state)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("Still alive!");
        t.Change(1000, 0);
    }
}

Much like GlaDOS, the Leaker object will be indefinitely "still alive" - yet, there is no way to access the object (except internally, and how can the object know when it's not referenced anymore?)

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There is still running code in this example, though. The callback method will run every so often. It's not a traditional memory leak until any code associated with it is also "dead". You might be able to use something like this to create a traditional memory leak, but the example as shown doesn't yet qualify. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 27 '10 at 3:43

If you aren't referring to applications using .NET, which these answers discuss very well, but are actually referring to the runtime itself, then it technically can have memory leaks, but at this point the implementation of the garbage collector is probably nearly bug-free. I have heard of one case in which a bug was found where something in the runtime, or maybe just in the standard libraries, had a memory leak. But I don't remember what it was (something very obscure), and I don't think I would be able to find it again.

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+1 Thank you, this is an important distinction that I didn't realize I was lumping together. –  Dinah Mar 31 '10 at 19:19

Well .NET has a garbage collector to clean things up when it sees fit. This is what separates it from other unmanaged languages.

But .NET can have memory leaks. GDI leaks are common among Windows Forms applications, for example. One of the applications I've helped develop experiences this on a regular basis. And when the employees in the office use multiple instances of it all day long it's not uncommon for them to hit the 10,000 GDI object limit inherent to Windows.

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Were the GDI objects wrapped in .NET objects? –  Steven Sudit Mar 26 '10 at 21:03
    
Yeah, the GDI objects are created from .NET directly. For example, the Brush class creates a brush GDI object behind the scenes. The garbage collector will normally clean this stuff up, but apparently we've found some circumstances where it won't. Anyway, this is a .NET 1.1 app that's being replaced by a WPF app as we speak. And WPF doesn't use GDI objects. So that's one way to solve it. –  Steve Wortham Mar 26 '10 at 21:53
    
The Brush object calls Dispose in its Finalize, so I suspect the leak would eventually be mopped up by the GC. Still, even if it's not a proper leak, it's definitely an unwanted delay in releasing a resource, which is a kind of leak. –  Steven Sudit Mar 29 '10 at 16:29

One major source of C/C++ memory leaks that effectively doesn't exist in .Net is when to deallocate shared memory

The following is from a Brad Abrams led class on Designing .NET Class Libraries

"Well, the first point is, of course, there are no memory leaks, right? No? There are still memory leaks? Well, there is a different kind of memory leak. How about that? So the kind of memory leak that we don’t have is, in the old world, you used to malloc some memory and then forget to do a free or add ref and forget to do a release, or whatever the pair is. And in the new world, the garbage collector ultimately owns all the memory, and the garbage collector will free that stuff when there are no longer any references. But there can still sort of be leaks, right? What are the sort of leaks? Well, if you keep a reference to that object alive, then the garbage collector can’t free that. So lots of times, what happens is you think you’ve gotten rid of that whole graph of objects, but there’s still one guy holding on to it with a reference, and then you’re stuck. The garbage collector can’t free that until you drop all your references to it.

The other one, I think, is a big issue. No memory ownership issue. If you go read the WIN32 API documentation, you’ll see, okay, I allocate this structure first and pass it in and then you populate it, and then I free it. Or do I tell you the size and you allocate it and then I free it later or you know, there are all these debates going on about who owns that memory and where it’s supposed to be freed. And many times, developers just give up on that and say, “Okay, whatever. Well, it’ll be free when the application shuts down,” and that’s not such a good plan.

In our world, the garbage collector owns all the managed memory, so there’s no memory ownership issue, whether you created it and pass it to the application, the application creates and you start using it. There’s no problem with any of that, because there’s no ambiguity. The garbage collector owns it all. "

Full Transcript

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Remember, the difference between a cache and a memory leak is policy. If your cache has a bad policy (or worse, none) for removing objects, it is indistinguishable from a memory leak.

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This reminds me of the title of a Raymond Chen post "A cache with a bad policy is another name for a memory leak" –  Conrad Frix Aug 4 '10 at 19:11
    
Conrad: Indeed, that's the inspiration for my post here. –  Gabe Aug 4 '10 at 20:16

This reference shows how leaks can happen in .Net using weak event patterns. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa970850.aspx

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.NET can have memory leaks but it does a lot to help you avoid them. All reference type objects are allocated from a managed heap which tracks what objects are currently being used (value types are usually allocated on the stack). Whenever a new reference type object is created in .NET, it is allocated from this managed heap. The garbage collector is responsible for periodically running and freeing up any object that is no longer used (no longer being referenced by anything else in the application).

Jeffrey Richter's book CLR via C# has a good chapter on how memory is managed in .NET.

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This is not technically correct: some objects are allocated on the stack, not the heap. –  Steven Sudit Mar 26 '10 at 21:05
    
Made correction to distinguish stack vs heap as pointed out by Steven Sudit. –  TLiebe Mar 26 '10 at 23:56
1  
It's still not technically correct. Value types inside declared classes are allocated on the heap. And the references to reference type objects can likewise be on the heap or stack, depending. –  Steven Sudit Mar 27 '10 at 0:26
1  
@Steven is right: The heap/stack is an implementation detail, with which one should not concern oneself when writing code in C#/.NET. The only exception is when writing C++/CLI, which allows you to explicitly choose heap or stack semantics, the latter being a kind of poor-man's RAII. In C# this does not apply, and you should never assume that a particular object will be allocated either on the heap or the stack, regardless of its type. –  Aaronaught Mar 27 '10 at 3:43
    
-1. Sorry, the only part of this answer that addresses the question of memory leaks is the fact that you mention the garbage collector. You've mentioned the stack and heap but nothing about the role they play in memory leaks or lack thereof. –  Dinah Mar 31 '10 at 19:12

The best example I've found was actually from Java, but the same principle applies to C#.

We were reading in text files that consisted of many long lines (each line was a few MB in heap). From each file, we searched for a few key substrings and kept just the substrings. After processing a few hundred text files, we ran out of memory.

It turned out that string.substring(...) would keep a reference to the original long string... even though we kept only 1000 characters or so, those sub-strings would still use several MB of memory each. In effect, we kept the contents of every file in memory.

This is an example of a dangling reference that resulted in leaked memory. The substring method was trying to reuse objects, but ended up wasting memory.

Edit: Not sure if this specific problem plagues .NET. The idea was to illustrate an actual design/optimization performed in a garbage collected language that was, in most cases, smart and useful, but can result in a unwanted memory usage.

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I don't believe this specific issue plagues the .NET String.Substring method. –  Steven Sudit Mar 26 '10 at 21:04
    
@Steven Studit - The .Net Garbage collector uses something called a LargeObjectHeap, which is collected very differently from the other generations. .Net doesn't doesn't like to throw "large objects" (only about 80K, iirc) away. It's not exactly what he describes here, but it explains his symptoms. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 27 '10 at 3:46
    
@Steve, Joel: Not sure if the substring problem affects .NET, but it describes a "memory leak" in a garbage collected system that is caused by an unrealized optimization. –  James Schek Mar 29 '10 at 14:44
    
Right, I understand your post in terms of caching of references being a form of apparent memory leakage. I've seen this under .NET in the excessive caching of the SMO classes. –  Steven Sudit Mar 30 '10 at 17:27

What about if you are using a managed dll but the dll contians unsafe code? I know this is spliting hairs, but if you dont have the source code, then from yourr point of view, you are only using managed code but you can still leak.

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