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Does anyone know an algorithm to either calculate the moon phase or age on a given date or find the dates for new/full moons in a given year?

Googling tells me the answer is in some Astronomy book, but I don't really want to buy a whole book when I only need a single page.

Update:

I should have qualified my statement about googling a little better. I did find solutions that only worked over some subset of time (like the 1900's); and the trig based solutions that would be more computationally expensive than I'd like.

S Lott in his Python book has several algorithms for calculating Easter on a given year, most are less than ten lines of code and some work for all days in the Gregorian calendar. Finding the full moon in March is a key piece of finding Easter so I figured there should be an algorithm that doesn't require trig and works for all dates in the Gregorian calendar.

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The same problem was on here bunches of times hidden in the problem of determining the date of Easter, Lint, Good Friday, and/or Passover. –  nategoose Mar 26 '10 at 21:54
4  
An accurate astronomical model is unavoidably complicated; the calculation for the full moon from which the date of Easter is derived (see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paschal_full_moon) uses a simplified model. –  Matthew Slattery Mar 27 '10 at 1:23
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A great use for the moon.py cited in the chosen answer is to write a GUI app (I'd go with GTK) to actually show the moon phase with a picture of the moon (actually I am trying to do this, which became considerably easier with this question and its answers...) –  heltonbiker Jul 5 '11 at 23:42

8 Answers 8

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I ported some code to Python for this a while back. I was going to just link to it, but it turns out that it fell off the web in the meantime, so I had to go dust it off and upload it again. See moon.py which is derived from John Walker's moontool.

I can't find a reference for this for what time spans it's accurate for either, but seems like the authors were pretty rigorous. Which means yes, it does use trig, but I can't imagine what the heck you would be using this for that would make it computationally prohibitive. Python function call overhead is probably more than the cost of the trig operations. Computers are pretty fast at computing.

The algorithms used in the code are drawn from the following sources:

Meeus, Jean. Astronomical Algorithms. Richmond: Willmann-Bell, 1991. ISBN 0-943396-35-2.

A must-have; if you only buy one book, make sure it's this one. Algorithms are presented mathematically, not as computer programs, but source code implementing many of the algorithms in the book can be ordered separately from the publisher in either QuickBasic, Turbo Pascal, or C. Meeus provides many worked examples of calculations which are essential to debugging your code, and frequently presents several algorithms with different tradeoffs among accuracy, speed, complexity, and long-term (century and millennia) validity.

Duffett-Smith, Peter. Practical Astronomy With Your Calculator. 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981. ISBN 0-521-28411-2.

Despite the word Calculator in the title; this is a valuable reference if you're interested in developing software which calculates planetary positions, orbits, eclipses, and the like. More background information is given than in Meeus, which helps those not already versed in astronomy learn the often-confusing terminology. The algorithms given are simpler and less accurate than those provided by Meeus, but are suitable for most practical work.

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"Computers are pretty fast at computing." - I love it! I may have to quote that one. –  Mark Ransom Mar 28 '10 at 1:42
    
Well I'm working on a calendaring system for Oracle and Postgres. I want to be able to find dates based on moon phase. And that could mean performing this calculation over a bunch of dates. And computationally expensive = visit from the DBA. :) –  Scott Bailey Mar 28 '10 at 5:45
    
The important bit here, of course, is that keturn's code and John Walker's code both contain references to authoritative sources against which their code can be checked. These sources are listed here. –  Richard Sep 6 '13 at 22:37
    
Richard, I don't mind citing the sources of the algorithms, but if you paste the reviews of those works here, do make it clear that those words are John Walker's, not yours or mine. –  keturn Sep 7 '13 at 22:55

I think you searched on wrong google:

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@Jack: WOW! +1... The memory. I couldn't tell where I knew that name from: "Ben Daglish". He was one of the best (I said one ;) composer of 8-bit music on the C64 back in the days. Amazing to find a link to him for something completely unrelated (I had to search trough his website until I found the C64 links to remember where I knew that name from). –  SyntaxT3rr0r Mar 26 '10 at 21:24
    
-1 One of the nice features of StackOverflow is that people can come here for answers, rather than links to answers. Additionally, your top link is broken, your second link has no citations to convince a careful programmer that the algorithms listed therein are correct, your third link has citations, but the code has all been altered from the originals. The fourth link's similarly problematic. –  Richard Sep 6 '13 at 22:31
    
Whose Google? The hits are REALLY different for different people. –  jkj Dec 25 '13 at 18:10

Also, pyephem — scientific-grade astronomy routines [PyPI], which is a Python package but has the computational guts in C, and that does say

Precision < 0.05" from -1369 to +2950.
Uses table lookup techniques to limit calls to trigonometric functions.

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Hey that's awesome. Thanks for the link keturn. –  Scott Bailey Mar 28 '10 at 5:26

If you're like me, you try to be a careful programmer. So it makes you nervous when you see random code scattered across the internet that purports to solve a complex astronomical problem, but doesn't explain why the solution is correct.

You believe that there must be authoritative sources such as books which contain careful, and complete, solutions. For instance:

Meeus, Jean. Astronomical Algorithms. Richmond: Willmann-Bell, 1991. ISBN 0-943396-35-2.

Duffett-Smith, Peter. Practical Astronomy With Your Calculator. 3rd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1981. ISBN 0-521-28411-2.

You place your trust in widely-used, well-tested, open source libraries which can have their errors corrected (unlike static web pages). Here then, is a Python solution to your question based on the PyEphem library, using the Phases of the Moon interface.

#!/usr/bin/python
import datetime
import ephem

def get_phase_on_day(year,month,day):
  """Returns a floating-point number from 0-1. where 0=new, 0.5=full, 1=new"""
  #Ephem stores its date numbers as floating points, which the following uses
  #to conveniently extract the percent time between one new moon and the next
  #This corresponds (somewhat roughly) to the phase of the moon.

  #Use Year, Month, Day as arguments
  date=ephem.Date(datetime.date(year,month,day))

  nnm = ephem.next_new_moon    (date)
  pnm = ephem.previous_new_moon(date)

  lunation=(date-pnm)/(nnm-pnm)

  #Note that there is a ephem.Moon().phase() command, but this returns the
  #percentage of the moon which is illuminated. This is not really what we want.

  return lunation

def get_moons_in_year(year):
  """Returns a list of the full and new moons in a year. The list contains tuples
of either the form (DATE,'full') or the form (DATE,'new')"""
  moons=[]

  date=ephem.Date(datetime.date(year,01,01))
  while date.datetime().year==year:
    date=ephem.next_full_moon(date)
    moons.append( (date,'full') )

  date=ephem.Date(datetime.date(year,01,01))
  while date.datetime().year==year:
    date=ephem.next_new_moon(date)
    moons.append( (date,'new') )

  #Note that previous_first_quarter_moon() and previous_last_quarter_moon()
  #are also methods

  moons.sort(key=lambda x: x[0])

  return moons

print get_phase_on_day(2013,1,1)

print get_moons_in_year(2013)

This returns

0.632652265318

[(2013/1/11 19:43:37, 'new'), (2013/1/27 04:38:22, 'full'), (2013/2/10 07:20:06, 'new'), (2013/2/25 20:26:03, 'full'), (2013/3/11 19:51:00, 'new'), (2013/3/27 09:27:18, 'full'), (2013/4/10 09:35:17, 'new'), (2013/4/25 19:57:06, 'full'), (2013/5/10 00:28:22, 'new'), (2013/5/25 04:24:55, 'full'), (2013/6/8 15:56:19, 'new'), (2013/6/23 11:32:15, 'full'), (2013/7/8 07:14:16, 'new'), (2013/7/22 18:15:31, 'full'), (2013/8/6 21:50:40, 'new'), (2013/8/21 01:44:35, 'full'), (2013/9/5 11:36:07, 'new'), (2013/9/19 11:12:49, 'full'), (2013/10/5 00:34:31, 'new'), (2013/10/18 23:37:39, 'full'), (2013/11/3 12:49:57, 'new'), (2013/11/17 15:15:44, 'full'), (2013/12/3 00:22:22, 'new'), (2013/12/17 09:28:05, 'full'), (2014/1/1 11:14:10, 'new'), (2014/1/16 04:52:10, 'full')]
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I know that you're looking for Python but if you can understand C# there's an open source project out there called Chronos XP which does this very well.

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I can read pretty much anything besides Perl. LOL. But Chronos XP seems to be more of an astrology app than astronomy. –  Scott Bailey Mar 31 '10 at 20:14
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Look in the file called LunarPhase.cs. That class basically does what it says it does. It's one of the better implementations I've found, which is unfortunate because it's still complex. If you don't want to download the whole source code just do a search for that file name on Google Code. –  Repo Man Mar 31 '10 at 21:23

I found a Python solution here (untested, no idea if it works; you'd have to verify this yourself).

def moon_phase(month, day, year):
    ages = [18, 0, 11, 22, 3, 14, 25, 6, 17, 28, 9, 20, 1, 12, 23, 4, 15, 26, 7]
    offsets = [-1, 1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 7, 9, 9]
    description = ["new (totally dark)",
      "waxing crescent (increasing to full)",
      "in its first quarter (increasing to full)",
      "waxing gibbous (increasing to full)",
      "full (full light)",
      "waning gibbous (decreasing from full)",
      "in its last quarter (decreasing from full)",
      "waning crescent (decreasing from full)"]
    months = ["Jan", "Feb", "Mar", "Apr", "May", "Jun", "Jul", "Aug", "Sep", "Oct", "Nov", "Dec"]

    if day == 31:
        day = 1
    days_into_phase = ((ages[(year + 1) % 19] + ((day + offsets[month-1]) % 30) + (year < 1900)) % 30)
    index = int((days_into_phase + 2) * 16/59.0)
    if index > 7:
        index = 7
    status = description[index]

    # light should be 100% 15 days into phase
    light = int(2 * days_into_phase * 100/29)
    if light > 100:
        light = abs(light - 200);
    date = "%d%s%d" % (day, months[month-1], year)

    return date, status, light

month = 3
day = 26
year = 2010  # use yyyy format

date, status, light = moon_phase(month, day, year)
print "moon phase on %s is %s, light = %d%s" % (date, status, light, '%')
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Yeah, this looks like what I want. Unfortunately the author didn't state over which range it was valid. I'll have to test it I guess. –  Scott Bailey Mar 26 '10 at 21:56
    
-1 Random code from the internet without references is not a good way of doing astronomical calculations. –  Richard Sep 6 '13 at 22:39

If you don't need high accuracy, you can always (ab)use a lunar (or lunisolar) calendar class (e.g., HijriCalendar or ChineseLunisolarCalendar in Microsoft .NET) to calculate the (approximate) moon phase of any date, as the calendar's "day-of-month" property, being a lunar (or lunisolar) calendar day, always corresponds to the moon phase (e.g., day 1 is the new moon, day 15 is the full moon, etc.)

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1  
-1 for mentioning .NET –  klemens May 17 '13 at 14:24

A quick google revealed this.

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I found this either, which is misteriously easier although very similar to moon.py (on chosen answer) results. –  heltonbiker Jul 5 '11 at 23:48
    
-1 One of the nice features of StackOverflow is that people can come here for answers, rather than links to answers. Additionally, the code you link to has no references to convince a careful programmer that it is correct. –  Richard Sep 6 '13 at 22:28

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