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I stumbled about a method which seems to be present in all data objects like QList, QQueue, QHash...

I even investigated so far I can see the source code of it, which is

inline void setSharable(bool sharable) {
    if (!sharable) detach(); d->sharable = sharable;
}

in qlist.h (lines 117).

But what effect does it have on the QList, QQueue, QHash... ? And is it in any way related to threading (which sounds reasonable)?

Thanks for any answer, and please only answer if you got actual knowledge.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The sharable state you're asking about has nothing to do with mutlithreading. It is instead an implementation detail of copy-on-write data classes (even single-threaded ones) that hand out references to internal state.

Consider a class String that is implemented using CoW (for illustration purposes, this class isn't usable in threaded contexts, because accesses to d->refcount aren't synchronised, it also doesn't ensure that the internal char arrary ends in '\0', and might as well eat your grandmother; you have been warned):

struct StringRep {
    StringRep()
        : capacity(0), size(0), refcount(0), sharable(true), data(0) {}
    ~StringRep() { delete[] data; }
    size_t capacity, size, refcount;
    bool sharable; // later...
    char * data;
};

class String {
    StringRep * d;
public:
    String() : d(new StringRep) { ++d->refcount; }
    ~String() { if (--d->refcount <= 0) delete d; }
    explicit String(const char * s)
        : d(new StringRep)
    {
        ++d->refcount;
        d->size = d->capacity = strlen(s);
        d->data = new char[d->size];
        memcpy(d->data, s, d->size);
    }
    String(const String &other)
        : d(other.d)
    {
        ++d->refcount;
    }
    void swap(String &other) { std::swap(d, other.d); }
    String &operator=(const String &other) {
        String(other).swap(*this); // copy-swap trick
        return *this;
    }

And a sample function each for mutating and const methods:

    void detach() {
        if (d->refcount == 1)
            return;
        StringRep * newRep = new StringRep(*d);
        ++newRep->refcount;
        newRep->data = new char[d->size];
        memcpy(newRep->data, d->data, d->size);
        --d->refcount;
        d = newRep;
    }

    void resize(size_t newSize) {
        if (newSize == d->size)
            return;
        detach(); // mutator methods need to detach
        if (newSize < d->size) {
            d->size = newSize;
        } else if (newSize > d->size) {
           char * newData = new char[newSize];
           memcpy(newData, d->data, d->size);
           delete[] d->data;
           d->data = newData;
        }
    }

    char operator[](size_t idx) const {
        // no detach() here, we're in a const method
        return d->data[idx];
    }

};

So far so good. But what if we want to provide a mutable operator[]?

    char & operator[](size_t idx) {
        detach(); // make sure we're not changing all the copies
                  // in case the returned reference is written to
        return d->data[idx];
    }

This naïve implementation has a flaw. Consider the following scenario:

    String s1("Hello World!");
    char & W = s1[7]; // hold reference to the W
    assert( W == 'W' );
    const String s1(s2); // Shallow copy, but s1, s2 should now
                         // act independently
    W = 'w'; // modify s1 _only_ (or so we think)
    assert( W == 'w' ); // ok
    assert( s1[7] == 'w' ); // ok
    assert( s2[7] == 'W' ); // boom! s2[7] == 'w' instead!

To prevent this, String has to mark itself non-sharable when it hands out a reference to internal data, so that any copy that is taken from it is always deep. So, we need to adjust detach() and char & operator[] like this:

    void detach() {
        if (d->refcount == 1 && /*new*/ d->sharable)
            return;
        // rest as above
    }
    char & operator[](size_t idx) {
        detach();
        d->shareable = false; // new
        return d->data[idx];
    }

When to reset the shareable state back to true again? A common technique is to say that references to internal state are invalidated when calling a non-const method, so that's where shareable is reset back to true. Since every non-const function calls detach(), we can reset shareable there, so that detach() finally becomes:

    void detach() {
        if (d->refcount == 1 && d->sharable) {
            d->sharable = true; // new
            return;
        }
        d->sharable = true; // new
        StringRep * newRep = new StringRep(*d);
        ++newRep->refcount;
        newRep->data = new char[d->size+1];
        memcpy(newRep->data, d->data, d->size+1);
        --d->refcount;
        d = newRep;
    }
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No one could say more clear:

http://qt.nokia.com/doc/4.6/implicit-sharing.html

It is common practice to realize containers this way.

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Though I search through the qt doc, I didn't stumble about that.. thanks very much –  drahnr Mar 27 '10 at 21:46

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