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I am working with thousands of meteorological time series data (Sample data can be downloaded from here) https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/bxioonfzqa4np6y/timeSeries.txt

Plotting these data using ggplot2 on my Linux Mint PC (64bit, 8GB RAM, Dual-core 2.6 GHz) took a lot of time. I'm wondering if there is a way to speed it up or a better way to plot these data? Thank you very much in advance for any suggestion!

This is the code I'm using for now

##############################################################################
#### load required libraries        
library(RCurl)
library(dplyr)    
library(reshape2)
library(ggplot2)

##############################################################################
#### Read data from URL
dataURL = "https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/bxioonfzqa4np6y/timeSeries.txt"
tmp <- getURL(dataURL)
df <- tbl_df(read.table(text = tmp, header=TRUE))
df

##############################################################################
#### Plot time series using ggplot2
# Melt the data by date first
df_melt <- melt(df, id="date")
str(df_melt)

df_plot <- ggplot(data = df_melt, aes(x = date, y = value, color = variable)) +
  geom_point() +
  scale_colour_discrete("Station #") +
  xlab("Date") +
  ylab("Daily Precipitation [mm]") +
  ggtitle('Daily precipitation from 1915 to 2011') +
  theme(plot.title = element_text(size=16, face="bold", vjust=2)) + # Change size & distance of the title
  theme(axis.text.x = element_text(angle=0, size=12, vjust=0.5)) + # Change size of tick text
  theme(axis.text.y = element_text(angle=0, size=12, vjust=0.5)) +
  theme( # Move x- & y-axis lables away from the axises
    axis.title.x = element_text(size=14, color="black", vjust=-0.35),
    axis.title.y = element_text(size=14, color="black", vjust=0.35)   
  ) +
  theme(legend.title = element_text(colour="chocolate", size=14, face="bold")) + # Change Legend text size
  guides(colour = guide_legend(override.aes = list(size=4))) + # Change legend symbol size
  guides(fill = guide_legend(ncols=2))
df_plot
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3  
Please do not post lines that destroy readers' workspace. –  G. Grothendieck Aug 12 '14 at 21:17
3  
As you want to render a point each day on the x axis for around 100 years, this means that a minimum ~35K width is required for your plot -- if you want to show 1 pixel large points. I doubt it's really needed, why not aggregate then? –  daroczig Aug 12 '14 at 21:21
    
@daroczig ...or buy 15 monitors to display it on. :) –  joran Aug 12 '14 at 22:38
1  
ggplot2 is not optimized for handling large data, rather it's optimized for programmer convenience. You will find that base plot or lattice are 100s of times faster. For ggplot2 you might consider reducing the data size first, for example by subsampling or aggregating. –  Alex Brown Aug 12 '14 at 22:56
    
+1 for providing your data, and for a working code example. –  jlhoward Aug 13 '14 at 0:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Part of your question asks for a "better way to plot these data".

In that spirit, you seem to have two problems, First, you expect to plot >35,000 points along the x-axis, which, as some of the comments point out, will result in pixel overlap on anything but an extremely large, high resolution monitor. Second, and more important IMO, you are trying to plot 69 time series (stations) on the same plot. In this type of situation a heatmap might be a better approach.

library(data.table)
library(ggplot2)
library(reshape2)          # for melt(...)
library(RColorBrewer)      # for brewer.pal(...)
url <-  "http://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/bxioonfzqa4np6y/timeSeries.txt"
dt  <- fread(url)
dt[,Year:=year(as.Date(date))]

dt.melt  <- melt(dt[,-1,with=F],id="Year",variable.name="Station")
dt.agg   <- dt.melt[,list(y=sum(value)),by=list(Year,Station)]
dt.agg[,Station:=factor(Station,levels=rev(levels(Station)))]
ggplot(dt.agg,aes(x=Year,y=Station)) + 
  geom_tile(aes(fill=y)) +
  scale_fill_gradientn("Annual\nPrecip. [mm]",
                       colours=rev(brewer.pal(9,"Spectral")))+
  scale_x_continuous(expand=c(0,0))+
  coord_fixed()

Note the use of data.tables. Your dataset is fairly large (because of all the columns; 35,000 rows is not all that large). In this situation data.tables will speed up processing substantially, especially fread(...) which is much faster than the text import functions in base R.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @jlhoward for the idea & also the solution that used data.tables. I always want to try this package. –  thecatalyst Aug 14 '14 at 6:34

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