Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I can't find the answer in teh Googles or SO, and it's annoying me.

Reading the javadocs, I find " If there is an explicit negative subpattern, it serves only to specify the negative prefix and suffix; the number of digits, minimal digits, and other characteristics are all the same as the positive pattern. That means that "#,##0.0#;(#)" produces precisely the same behavior as "#,##0.0#;(#,##0.0#)"." However, this code does not seem to follow with that:

import java.text.DecimalFormat;

public class NumberFormatTest {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("#,###;(#,###)");
        System.out.println(df.format(-1234.0));

        df.applyPattern("#,###;(#)");
        System.out.println(df.format(-1234.0));
    }
}

give an output of

(1,234)
(1,234

(note the missing paren in line 2)

What am I missing?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Bug in DecimalFormat. See bug report http://bugs.java.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=6609740

share|improve this answer

Try something

    DecimalFormat df=new DecimalFormat("#,##0.0");
    System.out.println(df.format(-12999.0));// the output is: -12 999,0

This is working

share|improve this answer
1  
It is indeed but it doesn't answer the question. –  EJP Aug 13 at 0:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.