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How do I append an array inside another array as a value and not as a reference? Below an illustrated example:

a = []
m = []
i = 1

# first loop
a[0] = i      
a[1] = i + 1
m << a #=> [[1,2]]

i += 1

# second loop
a[0] = i
a[1] = i + 1
m << a #=> [[2,3],[2,3]]

I expected something like [[1,2],[2,3]] instead.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may be able to better understand what is going on here by examining the id's of the various objects.

a = []
a.object_id    #=> 2164985760
m = []
i = 1

First loop

a[0] = i       #=> 1      
a[1] = i + 1   #=> 2
a.object_id    #=> 2164985760
m << a         #=> [[1,2]]
m.object_id    #=> 2165031720
m[0].object_id #=> 2164985760

Second loop

i += 1
a[0] = i       #=> 2
a[1] = i + 1   #=> 3
a.object_id    #=> 2164985760
m << a         #=> [[2, 3], [2, 3]]
m.object_id    #=> 2165031720
m[0].object_id #=> 2164985760
m[1].object_id #=> 2164985760

Now let's try it again, with just one change. As @sawa suggests, add a = [] before the second loop. (The following object ids will of course be different from those above.)

a = []
a.object_id     #=> 2164690760
m = []
i = 1

First loop

a[0] = i       #=> 1
a[1] = i + 1   #=> 2
a.object_id    #=> 2164690760
m << a         #=> [[1, 2]]
m.object_id    #=> 2164655180
m[0].object_id #=> 2164690760

Second loop

a = []
a.object_id    #=> 2161060600
i += 1         #=> 2
a[0] = i       #=> 2
a[1] = i + 1   #=> 3
a.object_id    #=> 2161060600
m << a         #=> [[1, 2], [2, 3]]
m.object_id    #=> 2164655180
m[0].object_id #=> 2164690760
m[1].object_id #=> 2161060600
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+1, so much educative effort here. –  Boris Stitnicky Aug 13 '14 at 7:37

Replace the first m << a with m << a.dup. This will push a copy (or duplicate) of a onto m, which is different from a, so when you modify a you won't be modifying the object in m. One way to see this is as follows:

a = []
m = []
m << a
a << 0
m #=> [[0]]

x = a.dup 
m << x
m #=> [[0], [0]]

a << 1
m #=> [[0, 1], [0]]

x << 2
m #=> [[0, 1], [0, 2]]
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Assign a to another array.

m = []

i = 1
a = []
a[0] = i      
a[1] = i + 1
m << a

i += 1
a = []
a[0] = i
a[1] = i + 1
m << a
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If you expected something like [[1,2],[2,3]] as a result after looping, you should probably be looking to use the Ruby functionality of .map to loop and return an array.

That way you wouldn't need to worry about managing the intermediate variables (or even, the counter in your example):

loop_count = 2 # or whatever currently determines how many loops you make
m = (1..loop_count).map do |i|
  [i, i+1]
end

m #=> [[1,2],[2,3]]
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