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I'm just trying to get text description of a last error with a really simple code, but keep getting a junk instead.

#include <cstdio>
#include <string>
#include <windows.h>

int main(){
    char err[256];
    memset(err, 0, 256);
    FormatMessage(FORMAT_MESSAGE_FROM_SYSTEM, NULL, GetLastError(),
                  MAKELANGID(LANG_NEUTRAL, SUBLANG_DEFAULT), err, 255, NULL);
    wprintf(L"%s\n", err);//just for the safe case
    puts(err);
    return 0;
}

FormatMessage() trying to write something, that probably should look like No error, but in fact I got: WINE: ┬√яюыэхэю єёях°эю. and WinXP in VirtualBox: ╬яхЁрЎш  єёях°эю чртхЁ°хэр.

I am already had bruteforced every idea that I had: in the example for some reason a wchar_t was used, so I tried to create a buffer with wchar_ts and cast it for the FormatMessage(else I got a compiler error cannot convert ‘wchar_t*’ to ‘LPSTR {aka char*}’ for argument ‘5’), I also thought that just the encoding is differ from the GNU/Linux one, so I installed a WinXP in VirtualBox, I am use in the code two different functions for printing the text; but no way, this is still keeps mumbling in it's own weird language.

OS: Ubuntu(WINE), WinXP(VirtualBox). Compiler: MinGW GCC

UPD: I am wrote the code, that works without the problem!

#include <cstdio>
#include <string>
#include <windows.h>

int main(){//msg box window
    wchar_t err[256];
    memset(err, 0, 256);
    FormatMessageW(FORMAT_MESSAGE_FROM_SYSTEM, NULL, GetLastError(),
                  MAKELANGID(LANG_NEUTRAL, SUBLANG_DEFAULT), err, 255, NULL);
    int msgboxID = MessageBoxW(
                              NULL,
                              err,
                              (LPCWSTR)L"☠",
                              MB_OK
                              );
    return 0;
}

This is upon being compiled with the -mwindows flag show up a message box with the correct last error description in both Ubuntu and WinXP. So, the problem is seems to be terminal only.

share|improve this question
    
This could be an encoding mismatch, what does the output of chcp give you? –  user657267 Aug 13 at 9:04
1  
@molbdnilo Executed on native windows, it's a pleasant surprise to get the message "The operation succeeded", when there was no last error. –  Christophe Aug 13 at 9:31
1  
@Hi-Angel, yes your code, but with TCHAR as described below and the puts() commented out. You can find the exact message here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  Christophe Aug 13 at 9:46
1  
@Hi-Angel Given that the text you posted in your question is exclusively in the 0x80-0xFF range for page 866 this is almost certainly a terminal code page issue, look at the page I linked above for Cyrillic and Russian code pages and try each one with chcp, running your app again each time. –  user657267 Aug 13 at 12:17
1  
@Hi-Angel: If you browse through System Error Codes you will find several messages that contain placeholders (e.g. ERROR_BAD_EXE_FORMAT: "%1 is not a valid Win32 application."). The system does not provide an interface to query the number and data types of placeholders, which makes them essentially useless. –  IInspectable Aug 14 at 13:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your terminal is set to the wrong code page, the sequence ┬√яюыэхэю in code page 866 is Выполнено in code page 1251 (i.e. the raw bytes c2 fb ef ee eb ed e5 ed ee), change your terminal code page by calling

chcp 1251

before you run your app and try again.

As to why your terminal code page does not match your system code page is anyone's guess, try resetting the cmd.exe settings for the local user by deleting the HKCU\Console registry key (make a registry backup first just in case).

share|improve this answer
    
Well, you're right. So, in order to make a program work in the WINE I need to launch like this LANG=ru_RU.cp1251 wine a.exe (where a.exe is an application to be launched) Unfortunately this did not a trick in Windows; anyway, I think that I can accept the answer, as this is proves that if user of an application can't see an output, he is just have wrong encoding. And either way, the terminal output I am was needed only for debug, in the release I will use GUI, of course. And, as I shown in the update, the GUI works just fine with encoding. –  Hi-Angel Aug 13 at 13:10
    
@Hi-Angel Right, I forgot you were using wine, anyway all's well that ends well! For future reference you might want to consider defining the UNICODE macro and using wide strings to avoid this altogether. –  user657267 Aug 13 at 13:13
    
user657267, the unicode with wchar_ts doesn't worked in terminal either ;) –  Hi-Angel Aug 13 at 13:20

It looks like you are mixing Unicode and multi-byte character sets, your code should be something like the following

int main() // unicode
{   wchar_t err[256];
    FormatMessage(FORMAT_MESSAGE_FROM_SYSTEM, NULL, GetLastError(),
                  MAKELANGID(LANG_NEUTRAL, SUBLANG_DEFAULT), err, 255, NULL);
    wprintf(L"%s\n", err);//just for the safe case
    _putws(err);
    return 0;
}

EDIT: added MBCS version

int main() // MBCS
{   char err[256];
    FormatMessage(FORMAT_MESSAGE_FROM_SYSTEM, NULL, GetLastError(),
                  MAKELANGID(LANG_NEUTRAL, SUBLANG_DEFAULT), err, 255, NULL);
    printf("%s\n", err);//just for the safe case
    puts(err);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I copied all your code(just added a cast), but the output is still the same :( Note: your code doesn't compiled, as you missing a cast for argument 5, I am mentioned alike situation in my post. –  Hi-Angel Aug 13 at 9:15
    
adding cast is not the correct way to go -- is your project Unicode or MBCS? –  Edward Clements Aug 13 at 9:18
    
I am had wrote a comment, but just catched a flashed thought: what does your question meant? Could it meant that under a Windows for the Unicode I need to add some flag for the time of compilation? And yes, I'd wanted a Unicode. –  Hi-Angel Aug 13 at 9:25
    
added code for MBCS –  Edward Clements Aug 13 at 9:26
1  
actually no, the IDE just creates a project file (.vcxproj), the command-line to compile the source is in there (/ZI /nologo /W3 /WX- /Od /Oy- /D "WIN32" /D "_DEBUG" /D "_CONSOLE" /D "_UNICODE" /D "UNICODE" /D "_AFXDLL" /Gm /EHsc /RTC1 /GS /fp:precise /Zc:wchar_t /Zc:forScope /Yu"StdAfx.h" /Fp"Debug\www.pch" /Fa"Debug\" /Fo"Debug\" /Fd"Debug\vc100.pdb" /Gd /analyze- /errorReport:queue); when I run the code, I get "The operation completed successfully" on my console. –  Edward Clements Aug 13 at 13:51

You have to adapt your coding to the windows API.

With native windows compiler, the err is immediatly spotted out as wrong type

Declare:

TCHAR err[256];

TCHAR is #defined to be consistent with all other functions declared in windows.h. This article explains the principle behind this microsoft specific naming convention.

Here you can also see that there are two versions of FormatMessage(): FormatMessageW (Unicode strings i.e. wchar_t) and FormatMessageA (ANSI i.e. char).

Edit: In the case of cross compilation, perticular care should be taken about #defines, that are generated automatically in the case of native use of MSVC. So don't forget to define the following symbols before including windows.h: WIN32, _CONSOLE, _UNICODE and UNICODE.

share|improve this answer
    
Alas, it didn't changed the output. –  Hi-Angel Aug 13 at 9:11
    
Hhm... And if you #define WIN32, #define _CONSOLE and #define _UNICODE and #define UNICODE at the beginning of your file, before including windows.h ? There are predefined settings on my native windows compiler. –  Christophe Aug 13 at 9:28
    
Hm... I just found that with the @EdwardClements's code (but with the FormatMessageW() the function _putws(err) prints nothing(but it prints K?>;=5=> CA?5H=>. under wine). What should be printed when no error? –  Hi-Angel Aug 13 at 9:34
    
The message is language specific, but its something like "The operation succeded". By the way, did you try with the additional #defines above ? –  Christophe Aug 13 at 9:40
    
yes, these defines doesn't changed an output. Tried with both the versions of function that I have so far. –  Hi-Angel Aug 13 at 9:45

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