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After some research I didn't find a good way to implement the std::bind in C.

I build a small program that implements an equivalent of std::bind in C by hacking the stack.

There's two functions I will try to bind to function with pre-defined arguments.

My problem is this code is only working under Windows. Under Linux, this is a mess. I this the problem is my knowledge of the stack and the way that arguments are store in memory.

Thanks,

Please, find below the code I made:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

The two functions I want to bind :

void test1 (int nombre, char t, int nombre2)
{
    printf ("test 1 : %d%c%d\n", nombre, t, nombre2);
}

void test2 (char t, int nombre, int nombre2)
{
    printf ("test 2 : %c%d%d\n", t, nombre, nombre2);
}

Two struct that will store the argument of each function (order of fields is important).

typedef struct {
    int nombre;
    char t;
    int nombre2;
} struct1;

typedef struct {
    char t;
    int nombre;
    int nombre2;
} struct2;

This "fake" struct will be use to write on the stack by dereferencing a structvoid* variable.

// Size must be bigger than every struct*
typedef struct {
    int i[10];
} structvoid;

The main function.

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    // Variables to store the two functions and their arguments.
    void * functions[2];
    structvoid * data[2];

    void *func1 = (void *)&test1;
    void *func2 = (void *)&test2;

    void (*functionPtrc)(structurevoid);

    // Definition of the argument of the first function test1
    struct1 data1;
    data1.nombre = 15;
    data1.t = 'c';
    data1.nombre2 = 30;

    // and storing data.
    void *datac = malloc (sizeof (structvoid));
    memcpy(datac, &data1, sizeof (struct1));
    data[0] = (structvoid*)datac;
    functions[0] = func1;

    // Same thing with function 2.
    struct2 data2;
    data2.t = 'a';
    data2.nombre = 5;
    data2.nombre2 = 10;

    datac = malloc (sizeof (structvoid));
    memcpy(datac, &data2, sizeof (struct2));
    data[1] = (structvoid*)datac;
    functions[1] = func2;

    // Get the pointer to the first function (test1);
    functionPtrc = functions[0];
    // All the hack is here. By dereferencing the data, this will write on the stack all arguments need by the test1 function.
    functionPtrc(*data[0]);
    functionPtrc = functions[1];
    functionPtrc(*data[1]);
    // To check the result.
    test1 (data1.nombre, data1.t, data1.nombre2);
    test2 (data2.t, data2.nombre, data2.nombre2);

    return 0;
}

EDIT Here a new version of the program by calling function via the calling convention. I only wrote the new lines. The problem of this method is I can only store data inside a "void *" field. If I increase the size of structvoid, I got garbage behaviors.

// Structure that memories each argument
typedef struct {
    void *i[1];
} structvoid;

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    // Variables to store the two functions and their arguments.
    void * functions[2];
    structvoid * data[2];

    void *func1 = (void *)&test1;

    // Let's start with a maximum of 5 arguments
    void (*functionPtrc)(structurevoid, structurevoid, structurevoid, structurevoid, structurevoid);

    // Definition of the argument of the first function test1
    struct1 data1;
    data1.nombre = 15;
    data1.t = 'c';
    data1.nombre2 = 30;

    // and storing data.
    structvoid *datac = malloc (sizeof (structvoid)*5);
    memcpy(&datac[0], &data1.nombre, sizeof (data1.nombre));
    memcpy(&datac[1], &data1.t, sizeof (data1.t));
    memcpy(&datac[2], &data1.nombre2, sizeof (data1.nombre2));
    data[0] = datac;
    functions[0] = func1;

    // Get the pointer to the first function (test1);
    functionPtrc = functions[0];
    // Call the function with the arguments. The unused argument will be ignored.
    functionPtrc(data[0][0], data[0][1], data[0][2], data[0][3], data[0][4]);
}
share|improve this question
4  
You're relying on undefined behaviors (one for all double casting between structures). You may do same thing without fixed structs (they also limit a lot your flexibility!) but with variable arguments and pushing/popping arguments into stack (memory layout varies, calling convention does not). –  Adriano Repetti Aug 13 '14 at 9:23
4  
The stack layout may not only differ between platforms, it may differ between different compilers on the same platform. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 13 '14 at 9:25
    
May I suggest it might be more elegant to implement this by making a wrapper of your function that takes a struct or va_list in the general case. This then means you can save the struct or va_list and just pass it to the wrapper later... –  Vality Aug 13 '14 at 10:37
    
Okay for the memory layout. I edit my question with a new version of the main function. This is working quite well but each argument's length must be at most "void *"'s size. If I increase the size of structvoid I have undefined behaviors. @AdrianoRepetti : What do you mean by "pushing/popping arguments" ? Isn't it possible only in asm ? Vality : I already thought about that but I don't want to use wrapper function because I want the method works easily on every function no matter which one without boring the programmer. –  LE GARREC Vincent Aug 13 '14 at 12:28
    
Yes it's possible with asm and you can write asm code in your C function (even if syntax isn't portable and it's compiler dependent, nothing few #if can't manage). –  Adriano Repetti Aug 13 '14 at 12:38

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