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In the following bit of code, pointer values and pointer addresses differ as expected.

But array values and addresses don't!

How can this be?

Output

my_array = 0022FF00
&my_array = 0022FF00
pointer_to_array = 0022FF00
&pointer_to_array = 0022FEFC
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  char my_array[100] = "some cool string";
  printf("my_array = %p\n", my_array);
  printf("&my_array = %p\n", &my_array);

  char *pointer_to_array = my_array;
  printf("pointer_to_array = %p\n", pointer_to_array);
  printf("&pointer_to_array = %p\n", &pointer_to_array);

  printf("Press ENTER to continue...\n");
  getchar();
  return 0;
}
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5 Answers

up vote 70 down vote accepted

The name of an array usually evaluates to the address of the first element of the array, so array and &array have the same value (but different types, so array+1 and &array+1 will not be equal if the array is more than 1 element long).

There are two exceptions to this: when the array name is an operand of sizeof or unary & (address-of), the name refers to the array object itself. Thus sizeof array gives you the size in bytes of the entire array, not the size of a pointer.

For an array defined as T array[size], it will have type T *. When/if you increment it, you get to the next element in the array.

&array evaluates to the same address, but given the same definition, it creates a pointer of the type T(*)[size] -- i.e., it's a pointer to an array, not to a single element. If you increment this pointer, it'll add the size of the entire array, not the size of a single element. For example, with code like this:

char array[16];
printf("%p\t%p", (void*)&array, (void*)(&array+1));

We can expect the second pointer to be 16 greater than the first (because it's an array of 16 char's). Since %p typically converts pointers in hexadecimal, it might look something like:

0x12341000    0x12341010
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Yep, adding 1 to each leads to different results. Do you know what type each belongs to? –  Alexandre Mar 27 '10 at 6:33
1  
@Alexandre: &array is a pointer to the first element of the array, where as array refers to the entire array. The fundamental difference can also be observed by comparing sizeof(array), to sizeof(&array). Note however that if you pass array as an argument to a function, only &array is in fact passed. You cannot pass an array by value unless it is encapsulated withing a struct. –  Clifford Mar 27 '10 at 7:52
4  
@Clifford: If you pass array to a function, it decays to a pointer to its first element so effectively &array[0] is passed, not &array which would be a pointer to the array. It may be a nit-pick but I think it's important to make clear; compilers will warn if the function has a prototype that matches the type of the pointer passed in. –  Charles Bailey Mar 27 '10 at 9:53
    
@Charles Bailey: Fair enough, if somewhat pedantic since the address of the array and the address of the first element of an array are the same address even if semantically different. –  Clifford Mar 27 '10 at 20:48
2  
@JohnLee: No, there does not have to be a pointer to the array anywhere in memory. If you create a pointer, you can then take its address: int *p = array; int **pp = &p;. –  Jerry Coffin Sep 12 '12 at 14:06
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That's because the array name (my_array) is different from a pointer to array. It is an alias to the address of an array, and its address is defined as the address of the array itself.

The pointer is a normal C variable on the stack, however. Thus, you can take its address and get a different value from the address it holds inside.

I wrote about this topic here - please take a look.

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Precisely correct. –  Dan Story Mar 27 '10 at 6:03
    
Shouldn't &my_array be an invalid operation since my_array's value isn't on the stack, only my_array[0...length] are? Then it would all make sense... –  Alexandre Mar 27 '10 at 6:22
    
@Alexandre: I'm not sure why it's allowed, actually. –  Eli Bendersky Mar 27 '10 at 6:46
    
You can take the address of any variable (if not marked register) whatever its storage duration: static, dynamic or automatic. –  Charles Bailey Mar 27 '10 at 10:00
    
my_array itself is on the stack, because my_array is the entire array. –  caf Mar 27 '10 at 12:42
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In C, when you used the name of an array in an expression (including passing it to a function), unless it is the operand of the address-of (&) operator or the sizeof operator, it decays to a pointer to its first element.

That is, in most contexts array is equivalent to &array[0] in both type and value.

In your example, my_array has type char[100] which decays to a char* when you pass it to printf.

&my_array has type char (*)[100] (pointer to array of 100 char). As it is the operand to &, this is one of the cases that my_array doesn't immediately decay to a pointer to its first element.

The pointer to the array has the same address value as a pointer to the first element of the array as an array object is just a contiguous sequence of its elements, but a pointer to an array has a different type to a pointer to an element of that array. This is important when you do pointer arithmetic on the two types of pointer.

pointer_to_array has type char * - initialized to point at the first element of the array as that is what my_array decays to in the initializer expression - and &pointer_to_array has type char ** (pointer to a pointer to a char).

Of these: my_array (after decay to char*), &my_array and pointer_to_array all point directly at either the array or the first element of the array and so have the same address value.

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Actually &myarray and myarray both are the base address.

If you want to see the difference instead of using

printf("my_array = %p\n", my_array);
printf("my_array = %p\n", &my_array);

use

printf("my_array = %s\n", my_array);
printf("my_array = %p\n", my_array);
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