Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

just want some advice on "best practice" regarding multi-threading tasks.

as an example, we have a C# application that upon startup reads data from various "type" table in our database and stores the information in a collection which we pass around the application. this prevents us from hitting the database each time this information is required.

at the moment the application is reading data from 10 tables synchronously. i would really like to have the application read from each table in a different thread all running in parallel. the application would wait for all the threads to complete before continuing with the startup of the application.

i have looked into BackGroundWorker but just want some advice on accomplishing the above.

  1. Does the method sound logical in order to speed up the startup time of our application
  2. How can we best handle all the threads keeping in mind that each thread's work is independent of one another, we just need to wait for all the threads to complete before continuing.

i look forward to some answers

share|improve this question
1  
Take a look at the parrallel task library, this will really simplify things for you. –  TimothyP Mar 27 '10 at 10:34
    
are you referring to Task Parallel Library (TPL)? I shall investigate it –  pharoc Mar 27 '10 at 10:37
1  
TPL is fantastic for this, but requires at least .NET 3.5sp1 (if you install Rx) or .NET 4 RC (built in framework) to use.... You've suggested you need a .NET 2 solution. –  Reed Copsey Apr 2 '10 at 22:33
2  
Just out of curiosity, have you tried any of these solutions and found a performance benefit? If the underlying data you're reading is coming from the same source, there may not be any benefit at all to making the reads parallel, since they will end up waiting on each-other for resource access anyway. All that happens is additional context-switching overhead. Multi-threading is really only beneficial for performance if a) you actually have multiple cores and b) you're gated by computation and not access to a shared resource –  Dan Bryant Apr 3 '10 at 0:51
1  
It would be really really nice if this question had an accepted answer, especially with the number of different users who contributed their time to this one –  demongolem Jul 13 '12 at 19:28

12 Answers 12

My preference for this is to handle this via a single WaitHandle, and use Interlocked to avoid locking on a counter:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int numThreads = 10;
        ManualResetEvent resetEvent = new ManualResetEvent(false);
        int toProcess = numThreads;

        // Start workers.
        for (int i = 0; i < numThreads; i++)
        {
            new Thread(delegate()
            {
                Console.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
                // If we're the last thread, signal
                if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref toProcess) == 0)
                    resetEvent.Set();
            }).Start();
        }

        // Wait for workers.
        resetEvent.WaitOne();
        Console.WriteLine("Finished.");
    }
}

This works well, and scales to any number of threads processing, without introducing locking.

share|improve this answer
    
:-) Great solution! +1 –  Andras Vass Apr 2 '10 at 22:18
1  
very elegant. Me likes. +1 –  Joel Apr 2 '10 at 22:24
1  
You are so very right. All the other solutions would likely spuriously wake up the waiting thread or at least place it on the ready queue. Sometimes this must be avoided - and if not, at least it should be avoided. Me shall delete. :P –  Andras Vass Apr 2 '10 at 22:50
    
@andras: (btw - with the "locking at the end of processing" comment on the other answer - even locking there can create a "queue"ing effect that delays things. With 10 threads, this isn't a problem, but if you're trying to synchronize against hundreds, or if you're rescheduling as you go, it can actually slow things down) –  Reed Copsey Apr 2 '10 at 23:06
    
@Reed: if we are really nitpicking, :) it can be argued that Interlocked will create a "queue"ing effect as well. (No two CPU-s can hold the contents of the same address in their cache exclusively for write at the same time. They must invalidate the cache line and pass the new content around through either main memory or inter-cache communication. This creates a "queue"ing effect if you update the same memory location from different CPUs - the writes must be serialized.) –  Andras Vass Apr 2 '10 at 23:18

I like @Reed's solution. Another way to accomplish the same in .NET 4.0 would be to use a CountdownEvent.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var numThreads = 10;
        var countdownEvent = new CountdownEvent(numThreads);

        // Start workers.
        for (var i = 0; i < numThreads; i++)
        {
            new Thread(delegate()
            {
                Console.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
                // Signal the CountdownEvent.
                countdownEvent.Signal();
            }).Start();
        }

        // Wait for workers.
        countdownEvent.Wait();
        Console.WriteLine("Finished.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you have more than 64 wait handles for an STA Thread as Mark says. you could create a list with your threads and wait for all to complete in a second loop.

//check that all threads have completed.
foreach (Thread thread in threadList)
{
     thread.Join();

}  
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Sometimes a simple Join works great. –  Ron Klein Apr 6 '10 at 19:59

If you're not on .NET 4.0 then you can use a List<ManualResetEvent>, one for each thread and Wait for them to be Set. To wait on multiple threads you could consider using WaitAll but watch out for the limit of 64 wait handles. If you need more than this, you can just loop over them and wait for each one individually.

If you want a faster startup exprience, you probably don't need to wait for all the data to be read during startup. Just display the GUI and any information that is missing can be shown greyed out with some sort of "Updating..." icon or similar. When the information comes in, just fire an event to update the GUI. There could be many operations that the user can begin to perform even before all the data from all tables is read in.

share|improve this answer
    
ManualResetEvent is my favorite synchronization tool! –  Polaris878 Apr 2 '10 at 20:12
1  
Mark: This can be done with a single ManualResetEvent and the Interlocked class. See my response below for details. –  Reed Copsey Apr 2 '10 at 22:16

If you're feeling adventurous you can use C# 4.0 and the Task Parallel Library:

Parallel.ForEach(jobList, curJob => {
  curJob.Process()
});
share|improve this answer
    
mmmmm thx but C# 4.0 seems to far at the right end of the curve for business apps. might have to come up with a C# 2.0 solution. –  pharoc Mar 27 '10 at 10:44

Just for fun, what @Reed has done, with Monitor. :P

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int numThreads = 10;
        int toProcess = numThreads;
        object syncRoot = new object();

        // Start workers.
        for (int i = 0; i < numThreads; i++)
        {
            new Thread(delegate()
            {
                Console.WriteLine(Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
                // If we're the last thread, signal
                if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref toProcess) == 0)
                {
                    lock (syncRoot)
                    {
                        Monitor.Pulse(syncRoot);
                    }
                }
            }).Start();
        }

        // Wait for workers.
        lock (syncRoot)
        {
            if (toProcess > 0)
            {
                Monitor.Wait(syncRoot);
            }
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Finished.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@andras: I put in another modification of this using a single ManualResetEvent - it is nicer because it completely eliminates the need for the locking in the processing, so it scales much better to larger worker counts. The semaphore option is similar, although I personally think more complicated than my answer below. –  Reed Copsey Apr 2 '10 at 22:15
    
@Reed: I was quite unhappy with the semaphore solution. (I have even deleted it from the answer at one point.) Even the Monitor based solution seemed so much nicer. Your solution is better in all respects. (...and performance wise, it's king....) :) –  Andras Vass Apr 2 '10 at 22:23
    
@Reed: Corrected. Thanks. :) –  Andras Vass Apr 6 '10 at 19:02

Here are two patterns for waiting on multiple parallel operations. The trick is that you have to treat your main thread as if it were one of the parallel operations as well. Otherwise, there is a subtle race condition between the signalling of completion in the worker threads and the waiting on that signal from the main thread.

int threadCount = 1;
ManualResetEvent finished = new ManualResetEvent(false);
for (int i = 0; i < NUM_WORK_ITEMS; i++)
{
  Interlocked.Increment(ref threadCount); 
  ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate 
  { 
      try 
      { 
           // do work 
      } 
      finally 
      { 
          if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref threadCount) == 0) finished.Set();
      } 
  }); 
}
if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref threadCount) == 0) finished.Set();
finished.WaitOne(); 

As a personal preference I like using the CountdownEvent class to do the counting for me which is available in .NET 4.0.

var finished = new CountdownEvent(1);
for (int i = 0; i < NUM_WORK_ITEMS; i++)
{
  finished.AddCount();
  ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate 
  { 
      try 
      { 
           // do work 
      } 
      finally 
      { 
        finished.Signal();
      } 
  }); 
}
finished.Signal();
finished.Wait(); 

The examples above use the ThreadPool, but you can swap that for whatever threading mechanism you prefer.

share|improve this answer

Assuming the database reader threads return as soon as they're done, you can simply call Thread.Join on all ten threads in turn from the initiating thread.

share|improve this answer

If you are using .NET 3.5 or below, you can use an array of AsyncResult or BackgroundWorker and count how many threads have returned (just don't forget to decrease counter with interlocked operations) (see http://www.albahari.com/threading/ as a reference).

If you are using .NET 4.0 a parallel for is the simplest approach.

share|improve this answer
    
any full source code sample using .NET 4.0 ? –  Kiquenet Jan 1 at 9:59
    
@Kiquenet Nothing ready that I currently have access to. I am not sure that this is the right site to ask for full code examples. –  Danny Varod Jan 1 at 11:27

an easier method I like to use:

    private int ThreadsCount = 100; //initialize threads count
    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {   
        for (int i = 0; i < ThreadsCount; i++)
        {
            Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(myMethod));
            t.IsBackground = true;
            t.Start(); 
        } 
    }

    private void myMethod()
    {
        //everytime a thread finishes executing decrease the threads count
        ThreadsCount = ThreadsCount - 1;

        if (ThreadsCount < 1)
        {
            //if all threads finished executing do whatever you wanna do here..
            MessageBox.Show("Finished Executing all threads!!!");
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Posting to maybe help some others, spent quite a bit of time looking for a solution like what I came up with. So I took a little different approach. I was spinning off numerous threads and incremented a counter and decremented a counter as a thread started and stopped. Then in the main method I was wanting to pause and wait for threads to complete I did.

while (threadCounter > 0)
{
    Thread.Sleep(500); //Make it pause for half second so that we don’t spin the cpu out of control.
}

Documented on my blog. http://www.adamthings.com/post/2012/07/11/ensure-threads-have-finished-before-method-continues-in-c/

share|improve this answer
    
Why didn't Thread.Join() work for you? –  Robert Harvey Jul 11 '12 at 18:49
    
I couldn't get Thread.Join() to stop PageLoad from finishing, where as making a simple counter, I could loop through until all threads finished. –  Adam Jul 11 '12 at 19:10

Another possibility with TPL, assuming jobs is the collections of items to process, or subthreads to run:

Task.WaitAll(jobs
    .Select(job => TaskFactory.StartNew(() => /*run job*/))
    .ToArray());
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.