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I have a method that posts HTTP data and displays a UIAlertView if there is an error. If I have multiple HTTP post I will show multiple UIAlertView for every error.

I want to show a UIAlertView only if is not showing other UIAlertView. How can I determine this?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 39 down vote accepted

On the object that calls set an ivar before invoking the show method on your UIAlertView.

...

if !(self.alertShowing) {
theAlert = [[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:title message:details delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:nil otherButtonTitles:@"Okay", nil];
self.alertShowing = YES;
[theAlert show];
}

...

Then in your delegate method for the alert manage setting your flag ivar to no:

- (void)alertView:(UIAlertView *)alertView didDismissWithButtonIndex:(NSInteger)buttonIndex
{
  ...
  self.alertShowing = NO;
}

If you want the alerts to show sequentially, I would post notifications to add each message to a queue and then only take a message off the queue after an alert is dismissed.

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what if alert is showing but it can belong to other viewcontrollers and you don't know to each one? –  Gargo Oct 24 '12 at 9:14
    
That sounds like a different question than the original poster asked. With the first part of the answer provide, it is implied that the owning viewcontroller is known, so your follow-up does not make sense. –  Chip Coons Oct 24 '12 at 13:03
7  
No need to have an ivar, just check visible property, as in the answer below. –  sjwarner Feb 18 '13 at 16:43
    
I checked isFirstResponder of the alert view for true, that also worked. –  Saran Oct 7 '13 at 12:46
    
The visible property was not exposed at the time the original question was asked. Feel free to vote up the later answer if it is more correct now, but two years passed between the original question and the shift to properties (including visible). –  Chip Coons Mar 21 at 4:02

If you can control the other alert views, check the visible property for each of them.


In iOS 6 or before, when an alert appears, it will be moved to a _UIAlertOverlayWindow. Therefore, a pretty fragile method is to iterate through all windows and check if there's any UIAlertView subviews.

for (UIWindow* window in [UIApplication sharedApplication].windows) {
  NSArray* subviews = window.subviews;
  if ([subviews count] > 0)
    if ([[subviews objectAtIndex:0] isKindOfClass:[UIAlertView class]])
      return YES;
}
return NO;

This is undocumented as it depends on internal view hierarchy, although Apple cannot complain about this. A more reliable but even more undocumented method is to check if [_UIAlertManager visibleAlert] is nil.

These methods can't check if a UIAlertView from SpringBoard is shown.

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1  
one typo in your code "UIView* subviews = window.subviews; " it should be NSArray* subviews = window.subviews; by the way it helped me a lot thanks. –  Rahul Vyas Dec 20 '11 at 12:42
1  
it's not work in IOS 7+ –  Deepesh Jul 2 at 8:31
    
@Deepesh, have you found solution ? –  Jacky Jul 6 at 3:01
    
@Jacky, I am not found any right solution ... if you found any solution ... please paste your valuable answer ....Thanks –  Deepesh Jul 7 at 5:31

Why not just check the visible property, maintained by the UIAlertView class?

if (_alert) //alert is a retained property
{
    self.alert = [[[UIAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Your Title"
                                             message:@"Your message" 
                                            delegate:self
                                   cancelButtonTitle:@"Cancel"
                                   otherButtonTitles:@"OK"] autorelease];
}
if (!_alert.visible)
{
    [_alert show];
}
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1  
Nice works. Great and clean solution! –  HotJard Jan 9 at 12:47
- (BOOL)checkAlertExist{
for (UIWindow* window in [UIApplication sharedApplication].windows) {
    NSArray* subviews = window.subviews;
    if ([subviews count] > 0){
        for (id cc in subviews) {
            if ([cc isKindOfClass:[UIAlertView class]]) {
                return YES;
            }
        }
    }
}
return NO;
}
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1  
This will not work in iOS 7. The first subview could be a container. So you'd have to walk the entire possible tree. –  Womble Jun 2 at 2:00
    
@Womble, so have you found solution? –  Jacky Jul 6 at 3:02

Another option that works across the entire app and doesn't involve walking the view stack is to subclass UIAlertView to MyUIAlertView, add a static (class) variable BOOL alertIsShowing, and override the -(void)show selector.

In your overridden show selector, check the alertIsShowing variable. If it's YES then try again after a delay (use dispatch_after or set an NSTimer). If it's NO, go ahead and call [super show] and assign YES to alertIsShowing; when the alert view is hidden, set alertIsShowing back to NO (you'll need to be clever about handling the delegate).

Finally, go through and replace all UIAlertView instances with MyUIAlertView.

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// initialize default flag for alert... If alert is not open set isOpenAlert as NO
    Bool isAlertOpen;
    isAlertOpen = NO;
    if (isAlertOpen == NO){
    UIAlertView *alert =[[UIAlertView alloc]initWithTitle:@"Alert" message:@"Alert is Open" delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:@"Okay!!" otherButtonTitles: nil];
    [alert show];
    // Now set isAlertOpen to YES
    isAlertOpen = YES;
    }
    else
    {
    //Do something
    }
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