Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

in a C++ program, there is a point when it reads a string like:

"NONAME_1_1\r"

the \r is causing me trouble. I guess it prints or adds something like "^M". Is it right? Anyway it casues me problem, and I want to get rid of it.

I can not modify the input. I wonder how could I at this point, using C++, and in the easiest way, to remove \r for this string.

I know how to do it on bash but no clue on C++.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
How do you read the string? Are you using iostreams? Please post the relevant code. –  Björn Pollex Mar 27 '10 at 10:58
    
This sounds like a typical usage for strtok, if you were programming in C. –  svens Mar 27 '10 at 11:08
    
just a last question, when comparing strings character to character, I thought that "\r" would take two chars, but not, it is just one. how would i use a conditional ? if char[4]==`\r' ??? –  flow Mar 27 '10 at 15:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'm assuming that by string, you mean std::string.

If it's only the last character of the string that needs removing you can do:

mystring.pop_back();

mystring.erase(mystring.size() - 1);

Edit: pop_back() is the next version of C++, sorry.

With some checking:

if (!mystring.empty() && mystring[mystring.size() - 1] == '\r')
    mystring.erase(mystring.size() - 1);

If you want to remove all \r, you can use:

mystring.erase( std::remove(mystring.begin(), mystring.end(), '\r'), mystring.end() );
share|improve this answer
    
just a last question, when comparing strings character to character, I thought that "\r" would take two chars, but not, it is just one. how would i use a conditional ? if char[4]==`\r' ??? –  flow Mar 27 '10 at 15:24
    
@Werner: Backslash introduces and escape sequence. \r is a carriage return, ASCII code decimal 13/ hex 0D, ^M, etc. In single quotes it is a single character constant; in double quotes it would be a string literal composed of two characters: ASCII 13 and a terminating null. –  Charles Bailey Mar 27 '10 at 17:02
    
Thank you for this post. I knew there had to be an easy way to clean up file lines from old mac and windows file encoding. So now I run getline(File, line) first with no third arg to remove the \n if it exist, then I use your example to clean off any \r. It seems to be working. thanks. without this, garbage was being left in the last index of my token vector of each loop. I'm sure it was the encoding \r –  Miek Dec 20 '11 at 17:38

That depends on how you are holding it in memory:

  1. If it's in a std::string, just check the last byte and remove it if it's a '\r'.
  2. If it's in a const char*, you can use strncpy to copy the string into another char array, conditionally grabbing the last byte.
  3. If, by "I can not modify the input," you simply mean that you can't touch the source file, then you may have the option to read it into a char array and replace any trailing '\r' with '\0'.
share|improve this answer
    
i see. then is it that easy just like detecting \r ? could you tell me how would you then do it? thanks a lot –  flow Mar 27 '10 at 11:03
    
@Werner, I don't know how you are representing the input. Some sample code in your question would help. –  Marcelo Cantos Mar 27 '10 at 11:04

This is a common problem when reading lines from files after moving them between unix and windows.

  • Unix variants use "\n" (line feed) to terminate lines.
  • Windows uses "\r\n" (carriage return, line feed) to terminate lines.

You can run the "dos2unix" or "unix2dos" to convert lines in a file.

share|improve this answer
    
i know that, but the problem has to be solved on the code –  flow Mar 27 '10 at 13:20
    
Then use Charles Bailey's solution. –  Stephen Mar 27 '10 at 13:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.