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Lately, I've been trying to learn C++ from this website. Unfortunately whenever I try to run one of the code samples, I see that program open for about a half second and then immediately close. Is there any way to stop the program from closing immediately so that I can see the fruits of my effort? Thanks in advance.

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Are you double-clicking the executable? Are you working in Windows? Why aren't you working from the Command shell and typing in the commands as you want them executed? –  S.Lott Mar 27 '10 at 14:34
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@S Lott: Because if you push the "Go" button in your IDE you don't need to bother with a console. –  Billy ONeal Mar 27 '10 at 14:38
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You should consider getting a good book from which to learn C++. Websites are good resources, but are no match for a good introductory text. There's a definitive list of C++ books here: stackoverflow.com/questions/388242/… –  James McNellis Mar 27 '10 at 14:39
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@Billy If pressing the Go button closes the app when it terminates, you are using the wrong IDE. –  anon Mar 27 '10 at 14:48
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Asked and answered previously here: stackoverflow.com/questions/902261/… , though this one has a better title. –  dmckee Mar 27 '10 at 15:33

20 Answers 20

up vote 38 down vote accepted

Edit: As Charles Bailey rightly points out in a comment below, this won't work if there are characters buffered in stdin, and there's really no good way to work around that. If you're running with a debugger attached, John Dibling's suggested solution is probably the cleanest solution to your problem.

That said, I'll leave this here and maybe someone else will find it useful. I've used it a lot as a quick hack of sorts when writing tests during development.


At the end of your main function, you can call std::getchar();

This will get a single character from stdin, thus giving you the "press any key to continue" sort of behavior (if you actually want a "press any key" message, you'll have to print one yourself).

You need to #include <cstdio> for getchar.

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8  
getchar does not solve the problem - or only in limited circumstances, at least. It reads a char from stdin, but if there are already characters buffered from stdin the program will carry on without waiting regardless of whether you print a prompt or not. –  Charles Bailey Mar 27 '10 at 14:46
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@Charles: A good point. Ignoring until \n is a partial solution, but won't help if more than one line of input is buffered. I do not know of a standard C++ way to clear everything from an input stream. :-/ –  James McNellis Mar 27 '10 at 15:44
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@James: Old, but how about std::cin.ignore(std::cin.rdbuf()->in_avail());? Got it from here. –  GManNickG Oct 3 '10 at 10:35
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One option I use alot is std::cin.ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n'); with #include <limits>. –  Xeo Jan 29 '11 at 7:42
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Please don't do this. :( It's not part of your program's function to do this. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 23 '11 at 11:42

If you are using Visual Studio and you are starting the console application out of the IDE:

pressing CTRL-F5 (start without debugging) will start the application and keep the console window open until you press any key.

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Perfect! I've been plagued by this for so long and this worked. –  Nick Feb 23 '12 at 7:19
    
Starting the console out of the IDE? How and why would you do that? –  Imray Dec 18 '13 at 12:52

The solution by James works for all Platforms.

Alternatively on Windows you can also add the following just before you return from main function:

  system("pause");

This will run the pause command which waits till you press a key and also displays a nice message Press any key to continue . . .

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That sounds like a Rube Goldberg variation of a solution. –  Dave Van den Eynde Mar 27 '10 at 14:36
    
@Dave Van den Eynde: It's also quite common and comes standard in the boilerplate code in DevCPP. +1 –  Billy ONeal Mar 27 '10 at 14:37
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@Dave on the other hand it does make it clear that this is just a bodge for an example, while std:getch could be accidentally left in real code. –  Martin Beckett Mar 27 '10 at 17:10
    
This is a perfectly valid solution for those on Windows. Whilst not ideal, it does work –  thecoshman Oct 10 '12 at 13:12
    
Easiest, quickest, solution. Just what I needed –  Imray Dec 18 '13 at 12:53

There is probably a much easier and cleaner way of keeping the console open than adding more code to your program.

Are you using Microsoft's Visual C++ 2010 Express or something similar? If so, take a look at this MSDN thread.

Likely your IDE (Visual C++ 2010 Express is an IDE, if I'm not wrong) is set to close the console; in fact, an "Empty Project" in Visual C++ 2010 closes the console by default! To change this, do as the Microsoft Moderator suggested:

Please right click your project name and go to Properties page, please expand Configuration Properties -> Linker -> System, please select Console (/SUBSYSTEM:CONSOLE) in SubSystem dropdown. Because, by default, the Empty project does not specify it.

This solved the problem for me. Good luck with programming!

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What if it's not a console app? –  Jesse Pepper Mar 14 '12 at 6:29
    
This is the correct answer. Thank you. –  Jonathan Sep 6 '12 at 18:57
    
This is totally the best answer, the other answers are hacks. –  Kyle Smith Jan 20 at 3:49

Why not just run the program from a console ie run the program from cmd.exe if you're using Windows. That way the window stays open after the program finishes.

[EDIT]: When I use KDevelop4 there is a fully fledged instance of Bash (a Linux CLI) running in a tab at the bottom of the IDE. Which is what I use in these sort of circumstances.

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Because if you are using an IDE you don't generally use a console. You push go, the program runs, and that's it. –  Billy ONeal Mar 27 '10 at 14:40
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Any competent IDE will keep the console on screen when the app terminates - Code::Blocks for example does exactly this. –  anon Mar 27 '10 at 14:49
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@nobugz: I figured it out. To get the window to stick around, you have to have /SUBSYSTEM:CONSOLE on the linker command line. The documentation says that this is the default if main is defined, but if I don't explicitly set it on the command line, VS kills the window when the application exits. sigh –  James McNellis Mar 27 '10 at 17:23
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@James: that is required to get a console window in the first place. That in turn requires main() instead of WinMain(), not the other way around. I'm a bit lost... –  Hans Passant Mar 27 '10 at 17:32
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@nobugz: If you start from an "Empty Project" instead of a "Win32 Console Application" the subsystem is not explicitly set in the project properties. If you define main in the project, the linker by default uses the CONSOLE subsystem. When debugging or running, you'll get a console window. However, unless you explicitly specify CONSOLE as the subsystem in the project properties, Visual Studio will not keep the console window open. I always start from an empty project and I rarely change individual project properties, so I've never seen the console window stick around. Sorry for the confusion –  James McNellis Mar 27 '10 at 17:55

I usually just put a breakpoint on main()'s closing curly brace. When the end of the program is reached by whatever means the breakpoint will hit and you can ALT-Tab to the console window to view the output.

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If you run your code from a competent IDE, such as Code::Blocks, the IDE will manage the console it uses to run the code, keeping it open when the application closes. You don't want to add special code to keep the console open, because this will prevent it functioning correctly when you use it for real, outside of the IDE.

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If you are actually debugging your application in Visual C++, press F5 or the green triangle on the toolbar. If you aren't really debugging it (you have no breakpoints set), press Ctrl+F5 or choose Start Without Debugging on the menus (it's usually on the Debug menu, which I agree is confusing.) It will be a little faster, and more importantly to you, will pause at the end without you having to change your code.

Alternatively, open a command prompt, navigate to the folder where your exe is, and run it by typing its name. That way when it's finished running the command prompt doesn't close and you can see the output. I prefer both of these methods to adding code that stops the app just as its finished.

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Okay I'm guessing you are on Windows using Visual Studio... why? Well because if you are on some sort of Linux OS then you'd probably be running it from the console.

Anyways, you can add crap to the end of your program like others are suggesting, or you can just hit CTRL + F5 (start without debugging) and Visual Studio will leave the console up once complete.

Another option if you want to run the Debug version and not add crap to your code is to open the console window (Start -> Run -> cmd) and navigate to your Debug output directory. Then, just enter the name of your executable and it will run your debug program in the console. You can then use Visual Studio's attach to process or something if you really want to.

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Just add the following at the end of your program. It will try to capture some form of user input thus it stops the console from closing automatically.

cin.get();
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Call cin.get(); 2 times:

    //...
    cin.get();
    cin.get();
    return 0
}
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Add the following lines before any exit() function or before any returns in main():

std::cout << "Paused, press ENTER to continue." << std::endl;
cin.ignore(100000, "\n");
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This does not work for me, the first line works but pressing enter does nothing –  Qwertie ϟ Jan 22 at 10:39
    
Changing this to cin.ignore(); works –  Qwertie ϟ Jan 22 at 10:43

Before the end of your code insert this line:

system("pause");

This will keep the console until you hit a key.

#include<iostream>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
string s;
cout << "Please enter your first name followed by a newline\n";
cin >> s;
cout << "Hello, " << s << '\n';
system("pause"); // <----------------------------------
return 0; // this return statement isn't necessary
}
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See if your IDE has a checkbox in project setting to keep the window open after the program terminates. If not, use std::cin.get(); to read a character at the end of main function. However, be sure to use only line-based input (std::getline) or to deal with leftover unread characters otherwise (std::ignore until newline) because otherwise the .get() at the end will only read the garbage you left unread earlier.

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This seems to work well:

cin.clear();
cin.ignore(2);

If you clear the buffer first it won't be a problem when you read the next one. For some reason cin.ignore(1) does not work, it has to be 2.

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1  
2 is sometimes also not enough (when there are more key strokes queued). The correct way is to ignore as many characters as are in the queue. To with, cin.rdbuf()->in_avail. Not some magic number like 1 or 2. –  Konrad Rudolph Dec 31 '11 at 22:35

All you have to do set a variable for x then just type this in before the return 0;

cout<<"\nPress any key and hit enter to end...";
cin>>x;
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You could always just create a batch file. For example if your program is calles helloworld.exe some code would be:

@echo off :1 cls call helloworld.exe pause >nul goto :1

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you could also stick

while(true)
    ;

or

for(;;)
    ;

at the end

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Bad for the environment. –  Jesse Pepper Mar 14 '12 at 6:28
    
-1 Busy spins are evil. They consume your CPU cycles and accomplish nothing. If you are going to do something like this, at least put a call to pause inside the loop body to yield the majority of your cycles. –  Nathan Mar 29 '13 at 18:38

you can even declare an integer at the beginning of your main() function (say int a;) and put std::cin >> a; just before the return value. So the program will keep running until you press a key and enter.

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If you are running windows, then you can do system("pause >nul"); or system("pause"); It executes a console command to pause the program until you press a key. >nul prevents it from saying Press any key to continue....

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