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I'm trying to parse a webpage using Java with URLConnection. I try to set up the user-agent like this:

java.net.URLConnection c = url.openConnection();
c.setRequestProperty("User-Agent", "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10.4; en-US; rv:1.9.2.2) Gecko/20100316 Firefox/3.6.2");

But the resulting user agent is the one I specify, with "Java/1.5.0_19" appended to the end. Is there a way to truly set the user agent without this addition?

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How do you know that's the resulting user-agent? Where are you seeing it? –  skaffman Mar 27 '10 at 15:02
    
By fetching it with PHP and displaying it on the page that is being grabbed by Java. –  DiglettPotato Mar 27 '10 at 15:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Off hand, setting the http.agent system property to "" might do the trick (I don't have the code in front of me).

You might get away with:

 System.setProperty("http.agent", "");

but that might require a race between you and initialisation of the URL protocol handler, if it caches the value at startup (actually, I don't think it does).

The property can also be set through JNLP files (available to applets from 6u10) and on the command line:

-Dhttp.agent=

Or for wrapper commands:

-J-Dhttp.agent=
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How would I do that? c.setRequestProperty("http.agent","");? I'm assuming somewhere else... –  DiglettPotato Mar 27 '10 at 16:18
    
innovation.ch/java/HTTPClient/advanced_info.html -> http.agent –  Karussell Mar 27 '10 at 16:44
    
@diglettpotato I'm missing the word system. System property. Answer edits... –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Mar 27 '10 at 17:23

Just for clarification: setRequestProperty works just fine! At least with Java 1.6.30.

I listened on my machine with netcat(a port listener):

$ nc -l -p 8080

It simply listens on the port, so you see anything which gets requested, like raw http-headers.

And got the following http-headers without setRequestProperty:

GET /foobar HTTP/1.1
User-Agent: Java/1.6.0_30
Host: localhost:8080
Accept: text/html, image/gif, image/jpeg, *; q=.2, */*; q=.2
Connection: keep-alive

And WITH setRequestProperty:

GET /foobar HTTP/1.1
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10.4; en-US; rv:1.9.2.2) Gecko/20100316 Firefox/3.6.2
Host: localhost:8080
Accept: text/html, image/gif, image/jpeg, *; q=.2, */*; q=.2
Connection: keep-alive

As you can see the user agent was properly set.

Full example:

import java.io.IOException;
import java.net.URL;
import java.net.URLConnection;


public class TestUrlOpener {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        URL url = new URL("http://localhost:8080/foobar");
        URLConnection hc = url.openConnection();
        hc.setRequestProperty("User-Agent", "Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10.4; en-US; rv:1.9.2.2) Gecko/20100316 Firefox/3.6.2");

        System.out.println(hc.getContentType());
    }

}
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2  
This should be the accepted answer. –  Christian Brüggemann Jun 16 at 8:57

Slightly changed Tom Hawtins answer to:

 System.setProperty("http.agent", ""); 

according to http://www.ivoa.net/forum/apps/0903/0610.htm

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