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I have three classes. For example's sake, I'll call them AwesomeClass, CoolClass, PrettyClass. AwesomeClass instantiates an object of CoolClass and PrettyClass. Now, I want CoolClass to change a variable inside PrettyClass.

What is the best way to go about this? One way that I can think of would be to send the reference of PrettyClass to CoolClass, and then CoolClass could do something like instanceOfPrettyClass.setSomeVariable("42");. Or I could treat AwesomeClass as a controller and the other two classes as views (which is what they're being used as) and have CoolClass call some method in AwesomeClass which then calls another method in PrettyClass, but that feels very messy.

EDIT some example code

public class AwesomeClass
{
    public AwesomeClass()
    {
        CoolClass coolClass = new CoolClass();
        PrettyClass prettyClass = new PrettyClass();
    }
}

public class CoolClass
{
    public CoolClass()
    {
        Color colour = Color.RED;
    }
}

public class PrettyClass
{
    public PrettyClass()
    {
        //I want to set coolClass's colour to Color.BLACK here
    }
}
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1  
post the code what youve done so far –  Rod_Algonquin Aug 14 at 3:35
    
You, probably, need getters and setters. –  PM 77-1 Aug 14 at 3:36
    
If both CalledClassA and CalledClassB are views - how come CalledClassA needs to change something in CalledClassB ? –  alfasin Aug 14 at 3:38
    
Added some code. @alfasin my actual code has a toolbox panel in one class and a drawing panel in another class. I want selection of a particular tool via radio button in the toolbox panel to affect what shape is then drawn on the drawing panel. –  Birdie Aug 14 at 3:44
    
Sounds like the drawing panel should be registered to the radio-selection event on the toolbox. –  alfasin Aug 14 at 3:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm surprised no one has answered this. I think you have the right idea, although it might be backwards.

public class AwesomeClass
{
    public AwesomeClass()
    {
        CoolClass coolClass = new CoolClass();
        PrettyClass prettyClass = new PrettyClass( coolClass );  // change
    }
}

public class CoolClass()
{
    private Color colour;  // change

    public CoolClass
    {
        colour = Color.RED;  // change
    }

    public void setColor( Color color ) {  // add setter
      colour = color;
    }
}

public class PrettyClass
{

    public PrettyClass( CoolClass cc )  // change
    {
        //I want to set coolClass's colour to Color.BLACK here
        cc.setColor( Color.BLACK );  // change
    }
}

I think that's it.

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Is that the "best" way to do it? That's what I was planning on doing but wasn't sure if it was best-practice, as I'm pretty new to OOP. If it is, thanks very much! –  Birdie Aug 14 at 3:58
    
I see above that you mention GUI objects. Look up MVC, and check out another answer of mine. But basically yes it is best. I think though you should re-ask your question with the actual GUI objects you want to use. You'll get better answers. –  markspace Aug 14 at 13:15

Can we claim a static method "set" in CoolClass ? We don't need to pass a reference as parameter in "PrettyClass" constructor in that case. Any time we want to change the color, just use CoolClass.set(...) to do it.

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This is not answer of this question. you can write this in comments section. –  JavaDev Aug 14 at 4:27

You can do it using constructors:

public class CalledClassA {
        public void doCalledClassA() {..} 
}

public class CalledClassB {
   private CalledClassA calledClassA;
   public CalledClassB(CalledClassA calledClassA) {
      this.calledClassA = calledClassA;
   }

   public void doSomething() {
      calledClassA.doCalledClassA();
   }
}

or using setters as suggested above. I prefer using contractors as possible from the following reasons: REPEAT AFTER ME: SETTER INJECTION IS A SYMPTOM OF DESIGN PROBLEMS

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