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When I've worked a bit with my source code, I do my usual thing commit and then I push to a remote repo. But then I noticed I forgot to organize my imports in the source code. So I do the amend command to replace the previous commit:

> git commit --amend

Unfortunately the commit can't be pushed back to the repository. It is rejected like this:

> git push origin
To //my.remote.repo.com/stuff.git/
 ! [rejected]        master -> master (non-fast forward)
error: failed to push some refs to '//my.remote.repo.com/stuff.git/'

What should I do? (I can access the remote repo)

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What if my --amend was only to change the commit message? Any way to edit the last commit message alone, if it was already pushed to remote? I did that on Github and got the same message about non fast forward. Then I applied a solution below but the merge just added more commit messages on top.. –  user58777 Mar 6 '10 at 23:17
4  
@faB: I think that is a FAQ. A commit message is hashed along with the commit, so chaning it changes the revid (hash). If it isn't clear: no you cannot. IIRC can store out-of-band info in notes (so you can annotate existing commits without altering them). To label specific commits, use tags –  sehe Mar 21 '11 at 22:06
1  
You will soon (git1.8.5, Q4 2013) be able to do a git push -force more carefully. –  VonC Sep 10 '13 at 8:42

7 Answers 7

up vote 190 down vote accepted

I actually once pushed with --force to git.git repository and got scolded by Linus BIG TIME. It will create a lot of problems for other people. A simple answer is "don't do it".

I see others gave the recipe for doing so anyway, so I won't repeat them here, but here is a tip to recover from the situation after you have pushed out the amended commit with --force (or +master).

  1. First, you find the old commit that you amended (call it old, and we'll call the new commit you created by amending new).
  2. Then create a merge between old and new, recording the tree of new, like git checkout new && git merge -s ours old.
  3. Merge that to your master with git merge master
  4. Update your master with the result with git push . HEAD:master
  5. Then push the result out.

Then people who were unfortunate enough to have based their work on the commit you obliterated by amending and forcing a push (which is your being a very very bad boy) will see the resulting merge will see that you favor new over old. Their later merges will not see the conflicts between old and new that resulted from your amending and they do not have to suffer.

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8  
I'm very well aware what happens when you force push an amended commit (by destroying history). Luckily enough, I was the only developer on the project with the remote repo being on a network drive so it wasn't that big of a deal. I never thought about merging an amend commit, so I'll upvote this. –  Spoike Jan 11 '09 at 12:06
209  
What did Linus say? –  Alan Apr 6 '11 at 17:50
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In our company, we force-push quite regularly... on feature branches developed by individuals. –  Ondra Žižka Mar 23 '12 at 6:57
    
The scolding from Linus was because you erased history with the force option, not because you shouldn't do it. GabrielleV's solution works fine, because it doesn't change history. –  user411279 Oct 24 '13 at 14:41
    
@OndraŽižka we do the same, it keeps the git history much cleaner –  loostro Feb 15 at 15:35

What you are seeing is a git safety feature. git refuses to update the remote branch with your branch because your branch's head commit is not a direct descendent of the current head commit of the branch that you are pushing to.

If this were not the case, then two people pushing to the same repository at about the same time would not know that there was a new commit coming in at the same time and whoever pushed last would lose the work of the previous pusher without either of them realising this.

If you know that you are the only person pushing and you want to push an amended commit or push a commit that winds back the branch, you can 'force' git to update the remote branch by using the -f switch.

git push -f origin master

Even this may not work as git allows remote repositories to refuse non-fastforward pushes at the far end by using the config variable 'receive.denynonfastforwards'. If this is the case the rejection reason will look like this (note the 'remote rejected' part):

 ! [remote rejected] master -> master (non-fast forward)

To get around this, you either need to change the remote repository's config or as a dirty hack you can delete and recreate the branch thus:

git push origin :master
git push origin master

In general the last parameter to git push uses the format <local_ref>:<remote_ref>, where local_ref is the name of the branch on the local repository and remote_ref is the name of the branch on the remote repository. This command pair uses two shorthands. :master has a null local_ref which means push a null branch to the remote side master, i.e. delete the remote branch. A branch name with no : means push the local branch with the given name to the remote branch with the same name. master in this situation is short for master:master.

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4  
saved the day, thanks –  Eelco Jun 10 '10 at 9:30
    
this did not work with github, it gave me the following message: [remote rejected] master (deletion of current branch prohibited) –  vedang Nov 12 '10 at 13:12
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This is the only solution that worked for my repo hosted with assembla. –  Failpunk Feb 4 '11 at 0:56
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deleting the remote master branch will free the space in the remote repo ? –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Apr 29 '12 at 13:55
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@Mr_and_Mrs_D: Not immediately, but after a git gc once the reflogs have expired old objects will be pruned. Nobody who clones the repository will get any objects that are no longer reachable as soon as the branch has been updated. –  Charles Bailey Apr 29 '12 at 13:59

Quick rant: The fact that no-one has posted the simple answer here demonstrates the desperate user-hostility exhibited by the Git CLI.

Anyway, the "obvious" way to do this, assuming you haven't tried to force the push, is to pull first. This pulls the change that you ammended (and so no longer have) so that you have it again.

Once you have resolved any conflicts, you can push again.

So:

git pull

If you get errors in pull, maybe something is wrong in your local repo config (I had a wrong ref in .git/config branch section)

And after

git push

Maybe you will get an extra commit with subject telling about a "Trivial merge"

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2  
Yes, I wrote about this, see stackoverflow.com/questions/253055/… ;) –  Spoike Sep 22 '09 at 10:58
    
Thanks that was very helpful. –  user58777 Mar 6 '10 at 23:18
    
This is the very best and simple solution if you can pull succesfully ! –  GabrieleV Jan 11 '12 at 7:58
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This doesnt really work like I expected it to. It creates two new commits. One that is a replica of the old one, but with the amended changes. And one merge commit with an empty diff. Still leaving the old commit unchanged, revealing possibly sensitive data that I was trying to amend away. I believe git push -f or git reset is the only way to go here. –  thnee Nov 5 '13 at 11:53
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While technically answering the problem, it doesn't really address the issue. As you said, it will generate an extra commit, but the main reason people amend a commit is to avoid creating a new one. So if the poster were to follow your instructions, he wouldn't get the desired result. It would make just as much sense to not amend the commit in the first place. –  Dan Jones Jul 30 at 17:36

Short answer: Don't push amended commits to a public repo.

Long answer: A few Git commands, like git commit --amend and git rebase, actually rewrite the history graph. This is fine as long as you haven't published your changes, but once you do, you really shouldn't be mucking around with the history, because if someone already got your changes, then when they try to pull again, it might fail. Instead of amending a commit, you should just make a new commit with the changes.

However, if you really, really want to push an amended commit, you can do so like this:

$ git push origin +master:master

The leading + sign will force the push to occur, even if it doesn't result in a "fast-forward" commit. (A fast-forward commit occurs when the changes you are pushing are a direct descendant of the changes already in the public repo.)

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2  
How is this different ( better or worse) than git push -f ? Thanks! –  bentford Feb 27 '12 at 15:36
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@bentford: It's basically the same thing as git push -f. –  mipadi Feb 27 '12 at 15:46
    
I tried this on github just now and worked like a charm –  Pablo Martin Viva Mar 20 '13 at 2:31

I have solved it by discarding my local amended commit and adding the new changes on top:

# rewind to commit before conflicting
git reset --soft HEAD~1
# pull the remote version
git pull
# add the new commit on top
git add ...
git commit
git push
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This is the simplest version! –  user1085954 Apr 14 at 13:28

I had to fix this problem with pulling from the remote repo and deal with the merge conflicts that arose, commit and then push. But I feel like there is a better way.

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Not really. The issue might be that you haven't updated your local copy from the remote repo. Git won't push to it because you may have to deal with merges manually. In my other reply, I have a command (and explanation) that will force a push -- but beware that is may delete changes in the remote. –  mipadi Oct 31 '08 at 18:14

Had the same problem.

  • accidentally amended the last commit that was allready pushed
  • done alot of changes locally, committed some 5 times
  • tried to push, got an error, panicked, merged remote, got alot of not-my-files, pushed, failed, etc.

As a GIT-newbie, I thought it was comlpete fubar.

Solution: somewhat like @bara suggested + created a local backup branch

# Rewind to commit just before the pushed-and-amended one. 
# Replace <hash> with the needed hash.
# --soft means: leave all the changes there, so nothing is lost.
git reset --soft <hash>

# Create new branch, just for a backup, still having all changes in it. 
# The branch was feature/1234, new one - feature/1234-gone-bad
git checkout -b feature/1234-gone-bad

# Commit all the changes (all the mess) not to loose it & not to carry around
git commit -a -m "feature/1234 backup"

# Switch back to the original branch
git checkout feature/1234

# Pull the from remote (named 'origin'), thus 'repairing' our main problem
git pull origin/feature/1234

# Now you have a clean-and-non-diverged branch and a backup of the local changes.
# Check the needed files from the backup branch
git checkout feature/1234-gone-bad -- the/path/to/file.php

Maybe its not a fast and clean solution and I lost my history (1 commit instead of 5), but it saved a days work.

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