Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an abstract class with a pure virtual function f() and i want to create a class inherited from that class, and also override function f(). I seperated the header file and the cpp file. I declared the function f(int) in the header file and the definition is in the cpp file. However, the compiler says the derived class is still abstract. How can i fix it?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The functions f() and f(int) do not have the same signature, so the second would not provide an implementation for the first. The signatures of the PVF and the implementation must match exactly.

share|improve this answer
    
isn't it considered as override? –  cemregoksu Mar 27 '10 at 20:45
    
@cemregoksu No, they are different functions. The "real name" of a function in C++ is its apparent name plus all the types of the functions parameters, plus the function's constness, all encoded somehow. –  anon Mar 27 '10 at 20:46
    
@cemregoksu: No they are different functions f() and f(int). They have the same name but not the same signature, and so they are different functions. –  Brian R. Bondy Mar 27 '10 at 20:46
    
I didn't know that. thank you both=) –  cemregoksu Mar 27 '10 at 20:49
add comment

Are you declaring f(int) in your base class as pure virtual or f()?

Pure virtual functions can have definitions inside their base class. A pure virtual function simply says that the derived type must also specify their own implementations of the function f(int).

class Base
{
public:
  virtual void f(int) = 0;
}


Base::f(int)
{
//some code 
}


class Derived : public Base
{
public:
  virtual void f(int)
  {//Implementation is needed in Derived since f(int) is pure virtual
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
i want to declare void f(int) in the derived clas, which was declared as virtual void f()=0 in the base class –  cemregoksu Mar 27 '10 at 20:43
    
Your problem is that you need to have f(int)=0 in your base class then. –  Brian R. Bondy Mar 27 '10 at 20:44
    
hmm...but i want to derive several classes and want to use different forms such as f(string), f(int) etc in different classes. so the unique solution for me is to change the function names,i think. –  cemregoksu Mar 27 '10 at 20:48
    
@cemregoksu: f(string), f(int) are completely different functions. You can for example require implementation of f() but there is no generic way to say require implementation of f(anything). –  Brian R. Bondy Mar 27 '10 at 20:56
add comment

What about using C++ templates?

template<typename T>
 class Basic{
  public:
   void f(T);
};

template<typename T>
 Basic<T>::f(T t){
   //Do something generic here
 }

You can use template specialization if your function f needs to do something else when it's parameter is a specific type. I'll use string in this example.

template<>
 class Basic<string>{
  public:
   void f(string);
};

template<>
 Basic<string>::f(string t){
   //Do your special thing with a string
}

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.