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I wanted to make a Makefile for the program I am currently writing but I have a problem when it comes to compiling. Until now I have just include the source file into main and compile it with:

gcc main.c -lcrypto -lssl

I am using openssl in my program. But as I read that this isn't good practice, I wanted to write a make file and just include the header files in main. But I have the following problem:

I want to first make the .o files:

gcc -lcrypto -lssl -c read_and_send.c

But for this one I get a lot of errors (unkown type name), the types that where defined in the OpenSSL library. I have no clue how to fix it as for using the math library I would write:

gcc -lm -c read_and_send.c

wouldn't I?

I am looking forward to hear from you.

Kind regards

Greenality

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At compile time, you care about header files which would have declarations for library files you're using. So you need appropriate -I... options if they aren't already in the include path. At link time (no -c) then you use reference libraries for linking. – lurker Aug 14 '14 at 13:12
    
The -c option to gcc tells it not to invoke the linker, which means that the -l... options are meaningless. – Keith Thompson Aug 14 '14 at 15:11
up vote 2 down vote accepted

But for this one I get a lot of errors (unkown type name), the types that where defined in the openssl library.

You need to include the openssl headers in read_and_send.c

You should read a basic tutorial on C programming and how to use headers and how to compile and link.

I have no clue how to fix it as for using the math library I would write:

gcc -lm -c read_and_send.c

wouldn't I?

No, the -c option means you only want to compile the source into a .o file, not link, so libraries are not used, and any -l options will be ignored.

You need to use the -l options when you link all the .o files together to create an executable. When you do that linking step, the libraries should be at the end of the command, after the files that depend on them.

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Hi, thanks for anwsering. I have another question, would be nice if you could anwser this as well. I have seen some programs where they just include source files in there main file, this seems to be easier, why one shouldn't use this method? – Con Aug 14 '14 at 13:35
    
@user3852496 keeping source files separate means that if one changes, you only have to recompile that source file, rather than recompiling everything. An extreme example would be the Linux kernel; kernel compilation can sometimes take more than 20-30 minutes, maybe even a few hours. If you're trying to make incremental changes to one file, it'd be very inefficient to have to recompile the whole kernel just for that one change. – Drew McGowen Aug 14 '14 at 13:41
    
Ok, thank you. :-) – Con Aug 14 '14 at 13:42
    
Thanks :-) I have solved my problem. :-) – Con Aug 14 '14 at 13:49
    
Including source files in other source files is disgusting and bad practice. It violates the design principles of the language such as assuming that variables or functions declared static are not visible in other source files, and is just lazy and ugly too. – Jonathan Wakely Aug 14 '14 at 13:52

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