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git init
echo 'I am foo' > foo.txt
git add foo.txt # this woould create a git commit object
echo ' I am foo2' > foo.txt
git add foo.txt # this would create another git commit object
git commit -m 'doe' # this would create two git 
                    # objects: one commit object and one tree object

How do I get a list of all 4 commits SHA1_HASH ?

cd .git/objects
ls
(master)$ ls -al
total 0
drwxr-xr-x   8 nsingh  staff  272 Mar 27 16:44 .
drwxr-xr-x  13 nsingh  staff  442 Mar 27 16:44 ..
drwxr-xr-x   3 nsingh  staff  102 Mar 27 16:44 37
drwxr-xr-x   3 nsingh  staff  102 Mar 27 16:43 a2
drwxr-xr-x   3 nsingh  staff  102 Mar 27 16:44 e1
drwxr-xr-x   3 nsingh  staff  102 Mar 27 16:42 e6
drwxr-xr-x   2 nsingh  staff   68 Mar 27 16:42 info
drwxr-xr-x   2 nsingh  staff   68 Mar 27 16:42 pack

I can find the list of all 4 commits by looking at file here but there must be a better way.

share|improve this question
    
You're also a bit mistaken about having created four commit objects. All git add does is check things into the index. You only created one commit, when you ran git commit. And you almost certainly have no need to know what the SHA1 of the tree for that commit is, but if you were dying to know, you could use git log --pretty=%T to see it. – Jefromi Mar 27 '10 at 21:21
    
The objects you've created by doing all this are: a commit (from git commit), a tree (the tree of that commit), and a blob (the contents of foo.txt). The first echo/add pair had no lasting affect, because you overwrote it with the next pair. – Jefromi Mar 27 '10 at 21:22
1  
To learn more about the internals, try perhaps the git community book: book.git-scm.com/1_the_git_object_model.html or pro git: ttp://progit.org/book/ch9-2.html (among many many others) – Jefromi Mar 27 '10 at 21:24

Try git log --pretty=oneline.

share|improve this answer

git log --format=format:%H will print out only the commit hashes, one per line. Take a look at the pretty formats section of man git-log for more info on the format options. The --pretty=oneline suggestion is similar, but will also give you the commit messages as well as the hashes.

share|improve this answer
    
In current versions of git, you don't need that extra prefix - you can just do git log --pretty=%H. – Jefromi Mar 27 '10 at 21:17
3  
Or use git rev-list – Jakub Narębski Mar 27 '10 at 22:22

If you only want the abbreviated SHA 1, try git log --abbrev-commit --pretty=oneline.

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