Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

To check memory allocations we populate single precision arrays with unit values and interrogate with the SUM and DOT_PRODUCT commands. These intrinsics stop counting after 16777216 (= 2^24). How can we get these commands to count billions of elements? We prefer to avoid DO loops. This is not a problem with higher precision arrays.

program allocator

  use iso_fortran_env
  implicit NONE

  integer, parameter :: sp    = selected_real_kind ( REAL32 )
  integer, parameter :: xlint = selected_int_kind  ( INT64 )

  integer ( xlint )                            :: n = 100000000
  real    ( sp ), allocatable, dimension ( : ) :: array

  integer   ( xlint )     :: alloc_status = 0
  character ( len = 255 ) :: alloc_msg = ""

!   ALLOCATE
    allocate ( array ( 1 : n ), stat = alloc_status, errmsg = alloc_msg )
    if ( alloc_status /= 0 ) print *, 'allocation error on ', n, ' elements: stat = ', alloc_status, ', errmsg = ', alloc_msg

!   POPULATE
    array = 1.0_sp
    write ( *, '( "number of elements allocated = ", g0 )' )    n
    write ( *, '( "sum of elements              = ", g0 )' )    sum ( array )
    write ( *, '( "dot product                  = ", g0, / )' ) dot_product ( array, array )

!   DEALLOCATE
    deallocate ( array, stat = alloc_status, errmsg = alloc_msg )
    if ( alloc_status /= 0 ) print *, 'deallocation error on ', n, ' elements: stat = ', alloc_status, ', errmsg = ', alloc_msg

    write ( *, '( "compiler version = ", A )' ) compiler_version()
    write ( *, '( "compiler options = ", A )' ) trim ( compiler_options() )

end program allocator

Output:

number of elements allocated = 100000000
sum of elements              = 16777216.
dot product                  = 16777216.

compiler version = GCC version 4.6.2 20111019 (prerelease)
compiler options = -fPIC -mmacosx-version-min=10.6.8 -mtune=core2
share|improve this question
    
You probably know why that number is the result, but why are you against do-loops? I'm not clear whether you are asking about how to get the larger number or if it's "checking" the allocation that is important. Could you clarify (and if the latter, add what you want to check)? –  francescalus Aug 14 '14 at 20:05
    
@francescalus Why is that number the result? –  PetrH Aug 14 '14 at 20:13
    
The same way as your n would not fit in an INT32, the sum of array does not fit in REAL32... You could use REAL(SUM(DBLE(array))) if you wanted the result as a single precision number. –  Etienne Pellegrini Aug 14 '14 at 20:16
    
If you compile with -ffpe-trap=precision you'll see that you get a runtime error Program received signal SIGFPE: Floating-point exception - erroneous arithmetic operation. because you are overflowing a single precision real in your sum –  casey Aug 14 '14 at 20:29
    
@francescalus Our application is for a diagnostic tool on our Cray farms. The goal is to exploit the natural parallel tools within Fortran to avoid using MPI, OpenMP, etc. –  dantopa Aug 17 '14 at 0:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's due to the limited precision with single precision reals...

Since you only have 24 bits for your significant "digits", your resolution is 1/2**24 = 1/16777216. In other words, you cannot resolve an addition of 1/1677721 to 1, or in your case

16777216 + 1 = 16777216

To be able to resolve this operations which is required for both sum and dot_product (even if calculated using simple loops), you would need (at least) another bit of precision:

program allocator

  use iso_fortran_env
  implicit NONE

  integer, parameter :: sp    = REAL32
  integer, parameter :: xlint = INT64

  integer ( xlint )                            :: n = 100000000
  real    ( sp ), allocatable, dimension ( : ) :: array
  real    ( REAL64 )                           :: s
  integer ( xlint )                            :: i

  integer   ( xlint )     :: alloc_status = 0
  character ( len = 255 ) :: alloc_msg = ""

!   ALLOCATE
    allocate ( array ( 1 : n ), stat = alloc_status, errmsg = alloc_msg )
    if ( alloc_status /= 0 ) print *, 'allocation error on ', n, ' elements: stat = ', alloc_status, ', errmsg = ', alloc_msg

!   POPULATE
    array = 1.0_sp
    write ( *, '( "number of elements allocated = ", g0 )' )    n
    write ( *, '( "sum of elements              = ", g0 )' )    sum ( array )
    write ( *, '( "dot product                  = ", g0, / )' ) dot_product ( array, array )

    ! Calculate the sum using a double precision float
    s = real( array(1), REAL64 )
    do i=2,n
      s = s + real( array(i), REAL64 )
    enddo ! i
    write ( *, '( "sum of elements              = ", g0 )' )    s
    ! Calculate the dot product using a double precision float
    s = real( array(1), REAL64 )**2
    do i=2,n
      s = s + real( array(i), REAL64 )**2
    enddo ! i
    write ( *, '( "dot product                  = ", g0, / )' ) s

!   DEALLOCATE
    deallocate ( array, stat = alloc_status, errmsg = alloc_msg )
    if ( alloc_status /= 0 ) print *, 'deallocation error on ', n, ' elements: stat = ', alloc_status, ', errmsg = ', alloc_msg

    write ( *, '( "compiler version = ", A )' ) compiler_version()
    write ( *, '( "compiler options = ", A )' ) trim ( compiler_options() )

end program allocator

Output:

number of elements allocated = 100000000
sum of elements              = 16777216.0
dot product                  = 16777216.0

sum of elements              = 100000000.00000000
dot product                  = 100000000.00000000

compiler version = GCC version 4.8.4 20140605 (prerelease)
compiler options = -cpp -iprefix /home/elias/opt/sde/bin/../lib/gcc/x86_64-unknown-linux-gnu/4.8.4/ -mtune=generic -march=x86-64 -O0 -Wall -Wextra
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed, but with "simple loops" a better summation algorithm can be used or, at least, the extra bits of precision don't involve a massive array temporary. –  francescalus Aug 14 '14 at 20:18
    
True, I'll add an example... –  Alexander Vogt Aug 14 '14 at 20:19
2  
Right, in other words 1/2**24 is the machine epsilon with single precision. Got it. –  PetrH Aug 14 '14 at 20:19
    
But for me his code worked with ifort 14 and default flags. What magic did the compiler do then? –  PetrH Aug 14 '14 at 20:20
1  
@francescalus I see, the lesson is that the compiler is free to choose how to perform the intermediate calculations. So it may even depend on things like hardware as well. Or running the sum in parallel could also do it. –  PetrH Aug 14 '14 at 22:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.