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I have to write a method called getGrade that accepts an integer representing a students grade in a course and returns that students numerical course grade. It is based on the following scale:

Score     Grade
<60       0.0
60-62     0.7
63        0.8
64        0.9
65        1.0
...
92        3.7
93        3.8
94        3.9
>= 95     4.0

My output will be:

"Student's score is x; Student's grade is y

with x being the score (0 - 100) and y being the grade (0.0 - 4.0)

I have everything figured out except scores 63 - 94. It seems like there has to be a for loop here but I am unable to get it to work because the method is looking for a return statement and didn't like the one I had inside the nested for loop. After researching I have found that you cannot put a for statement inside an else-if. That being the case, how do I go about coding scores 63 - 94. Here is the code I have:

public class Exercise12 
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {   
        for(int i = 55; i <= 100 ; i++)
        {
            System.out.println("Student's score is: " + i + 
                    "\tStudent's grade is " + getGrade(i));
        }

    }
    public static double getGrade(int score)
    {
        double grade = 0.0;
        if(score < 60 && score > 0)
        {
            return grade = 0.0;
        }
        else if (score >= 60 && score <= 62)
        {
            return grade = 0.7;
        }
        else if(score >= 63 && score <= 94)
        {
            //nested for loop was here  
        }
        else if(score >= 95 && score <= 100)
        {
            return grade = 4.0;
        }           
        else 
        {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid values. Scores " +
                    "must be between 0 and 100");
        }           
    }       
}
share|improve this question
2  
You actually don't need a for loop. Take a look at the relationship between a single percentage point to GPA. You'll see that for every increase in percentage, there is an increase in GPA by 0.1. You really just need a simple arithmetic expression to calculate the GPA needed. –  rayryeng Aug 14 at 20:01
2  
" After researching I have found that you cannot put a for statement inside an else-if." Not sure where your research led you but this is false. But as @rayryeng points out, there is an easier way of getting from the points to the GPA. –  Paolo Aug 14 at 20:03
2  
In certain situation, it would be best to only set the grade inside the if statement and return it once at the end of your function. Otherwise, there is no need for the grade variable. –  Will Marcouiller Aug 14 at 20:10
1  
@WillMarcouiller - I agree with you. I would return the value directly because it's less confusing. –  rayryeng Aug 14 at 20:15
2  
Thanks for your consideration. I have also posted an answer for the sake of pedagogy stating my point. HTH. –  Will Marcouiller Aug 14 at 21:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Addressing the for loop misunderstanding:

If I understood you correctly, you tried to do this:

grade = 0.7;
for (int i = 63, i <= score; i++)
{
    return grade + 0.1;
}

The problem with this variant is that return does not wait for the for loop to finish returning the value, but will rather return the value directly when called. The solution to this problem is moving the return to the end of the statement to actually return the fully calculated value.


Well we can even skip the for loop by calculating the value directly:

else if(score >= 63 && score <= 94)
{
    return 0.7 + (0.1 * (score - 62));
}

Otherwise this is really just counting:

else if(score >= 63 && score <= 94)
{
    grade = 0.7;
    for (int i = 63, i <= score; i++)
    {
        grade += 0.1;
    }
    return grade;
}

As pointed out by others, I am also interested in where you read that it is impossible to use a for loop in an else if statement...

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1  
+1 - Yup... exactly like I was thinking! –  rayryeng Aug 14 at 20:03
    
Thank you for you help. I was so fixated on a for loop that the thought of doing the above didn't enter my mind. Duh. –  comfortablyNumb Aug 14 at 20:18

For the sake of pedagogy, here's how I would write it.

isOutOfRange()

I recommend extracting this method to make it obvious what the intention is. Though it is very simple here, in some other scenarios it becomes less obvious and the code gets harder and harder to read. Making this a habit is good practice, as far as I'm concerned.

private bool isOutOfAllowedRange(score) { return score < 0 || 100 < score; }

Single Exit Point

public double getGrade(int score) {
    double grade;

    if (isOutOfAllowedRange(score)) 
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Score must be between 0 and 100.");
    else if (score < 60) grade = .0;
    else if (score < 63) grade = .7;
    else if (score < 95) grade = .7 + (.1 * (scrore - 62)); // From ThreeFx
    else grade = 4.0;

    return grade;
}

In this very scenario, there's almost no need for a single exit point. Scenarios where the single exit point is useful is when you have to process the resulting value for computation or do something based on that value, log it or whatever. One who encounters a function written like so understands the control flow of the function and knows that whatever happens, it does exit where it is expected. Once a condition qualifies to true, the rest of the unchecked conditions shall remain untouched, ever, until a new score comes in.

Multiple Exit Points

public double getGrade(int score) {
    if (isOutOfAllowedRange(score)) 
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Score must be between 0 and 100.");
    else if (score < 60) return .0;
    else if (score < 63) return .7;
    else if (score < 95) return .7 + (.1 * (scrore - 62)); // From ThreeFx
    else return 4.0;
}

The advantage of using multiple exit points is in preferably simpler function where it's easy to understand that once the result is obtained, there is no need to continue. The code has bought what it came for and is ready to take out. It is sometimes more confusing to write such multiple exit points when the function gets more and more complex. Assuring the respect of the Single Responsibility Principle, one could avoid having too complex functions.

Is it best to have single or multiple exit point?

It is more or less a subjective matter, to be honest. The best answer shall be: "it depends". Based on certain criterion as described above, one can smartly enough decide when to use either.

On a side note...

First, the main point illustrated here is that there is no need to check for the intervals. By checking whether it's out of expected range at the beginning, you make sure that the rest shall suit one of the following conditions.

Second, as soon as the condition qualifies true, the code shall wave the other conditions away and going straight to the function exit point. Notice that if I had verified for <= 100 at the beginning, it would have always qualified once passed the isOutOfRange() validation.

Third, you may notice that if the score is less then 60, having successfully passed the first range check, this means we already know what the grade is. Furthermore, if the score isn't lesser than 60, the if (score < 63) gets automatically verified. For all other scores lesser than 95, that is, between 63 and 94, the code shall do the math for itself. There is actually no need to check whether it is between 63 and 94, because we already know that if this evaluation takes place, it is because the score is already greater than or equal to 63. The only one thing that remains to know is whether it is less than the next grade step, that is, whether it qualifies for 4 or not.

Fourth, once the code concludes that no other values qualifies, one is sure that the value at the end is the final grade step, grade 4.0.

Hope I've been clear enough to get understood, and that this will serve purpose to someone someday.

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1  
I can only speak for myself but it helped me out tremendously. It was very informative. Since I am teaching myself I have no professor or upper level classmen to tell me things like this. Only a book. Thank you for taking the time to do it. –  comfortablyNumb Aug 15 at 18:04
    
Thanks for your gratefulness. Anytime! =) –  Will Marcouiller Aug 17 at 0:30

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